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Halvorson's, Mary Code Girl: Artlessly Falling (Firehouse 12 Records)

The 2nd Code Girl release from guitarist Mary Halvorson presents an embraceable and ambitious set of songs from 8 poetic forms for which Halvorson composed words & music, 3 of which are sung by Robert Wyatt, the others by Amirtha Kidambi, in a band with Thumbscrew members Michael Formanek (bass), Tomas Fujiwara (drums), plus Maria Grand (sax) and Adam O'Farrill (trumpet).
 

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UPC: 0711574909728

Label: Firehouse 12 Records
Catalog ID: FH12-04-01-034
Squidco Product Code: 29754

Format: CD
Condition: New
Released: 2020
Country: USA
Packaging: Digipack
Recorded on December 8th and 9th, 2019, by Nick Lloyd and Greg DiCrosta. Additional recording by Ian James Stewart.


Personnel:

Amirtha Kidambi-voice

Maria Kim Grand-tenor saxophone, voice

Adam O'Farrill-trumpet

Mary Halvorson-guitar

Michael Formanek-bass

Tomas Fujiwara-drums, beer cans

Robert Wyatt-voice



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Artist Biographies:

"Amirtha Kidambi "takes a holistic approach to singing, which can mean treating every element as unfixed: Words can be opened up, rendered nonspecific. Melody can be repeated and frozen and stuck in place. Markings of rhythm can become utterly abstract, freed from cadence." (New York Times). Kidambi is the bandleader of Elder Ones and a soloist and collaborator in groups including Mary Halvorson's newest quintet Code Girl, Charlie Looker's early music inspired dark folk band Seaven Teares, Darius Jones' vocal quartet Elizabeth-Caroline Unit and Samesoul Maker and Pat Spadine's analog percussion and light ensemble Ashcan Orchestra. As Ben Ratliff wrote in the New York Times, "the aggressive and sublime first album by the band Elder Ones, Holy Science, is a kind of gauge for how strong and flexible the scene of young musicians in New York's improvised and experimental music world can be. At the center of it are drones and phonemes. The group's leader, the composer and singer Amirtha Kidambi, holds forth behind a harmonium, the small keyboard instrument with hand-pumped bellows; it's commonly used in bhajan, the Indian devotional-singing tradition that was central to her musical experience while growing up in a South Indian family." Kidambi formally trained in classical music, singing works by experimental composers including Robert Ashley and Luigi Nono, but the pull of free jazz and Alice Coltrane drew her toward a different path. The influence of both Alice and John Coltrane is especially apparent on the , as is her work with composer and saxophonist Darius Jones, and her study of Carnatic music. Kidambi formally trained in classical music, singing works by avant-gardists including Nono and Stockhausen, but the pull of free jazz and Alice Coltrane drew her toward a different path. The influence of both Alice and John Coltrane is especially apparent on the new album, as is her work with composer and saxophonist Darius Jones, and her study of Carnatic music. Elder Ones performed extensively nationally and internationally, on tours and at festivals such as NYC Winter Jazzfest, Berliner Festspiele in Germany and Festiwal Jazz Jantar in Poland, among other.

Kidambi is invested in the performance creative music, from free improvisation and jazz, to experimental bands, and new music. As an improviser, she has played with Matana Roberts, Tyshawn Sorey, Daniel Carter, Ava Mendoza, Sam Newsome, Peter Evans, Trevor Dunn, and many innovators in the New York scene. A life changing decision to create her own artistic work came from a collaboration with the late AACM founder, composer-pianist Muhal Richard Abrams', performing his Dialogue Social. Kidambi has also premiered Darius Jones' The Oversoul Manual at Carnegie Hall, Samesoul Maker at Roulette, LawNOrder at Winter Jazzfest, a premiere of electronic composer Ben Vida's work Slipping Control for voice and electronics with Tyondai Braxton at the Borderline Festival in Athens, Greece, the premiere of the late Robert Ashley's final opera CRASH at the Whitney Biennial, a Jazz Gallery commission for Mary Halvorson's Code Girl, the premiere of William Parker's Soul of Light and forthcoming recording project Voices Fall From the Sky and a commission from the Jerome Foundation for her quartet Elder Ones at Roulette and artist residency at EMPAC to record the group's debut album.

Amirtha earned a B.F.A. in Voice from Loyola Marymount University and an M.M. in Voice and Musicology from CUNY Brooklyn College, where she served as adjunct faculty. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Ethnomusicology at Columbia University."

-Amirtha Kidambi Website (http://www.amirthakidambi.com/bio/)
11/28/2020

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"María Kim Grand (born 1992, Switzerland) is a tenor saxophonist, recording artist, bandleader, vocalist, composer, visual artist, and educator. She has been based in New York City since 2011.

Grand has performed with such musicians such as Vijay Iyer, Steve Coleman, Greg Fox, Craig Taborn, Steve Lehman, Mary Halvorson, Doug Hammond, Jen Shyu, Rajna Swaminathan, Nicole Mitchell, Tamara Renée, Aaron Parks, Fay Victor, and others. She leads the ensemble DiaTribe. She has toured Europe, the United States, and South America, as both a leader and ensemble member, playing in clubs and concert halls, and at festivals.

Her debut EP, TetraWind, was released in 2017 on the Biophilia label, and featured accompaniment by Román Filiú, Rashaan Carter, David Bryant, and Craig Weinrib. NYC Jazz Record selected the EP as "one of the 2017's best debuts."

Her first full-length album, Magdalena, was issued in 2018 on Biophilia. Along with Carter and Bryant, the album's ensemble included Jasmine Wilson, Amani Fela, Mary Halvorson, Fabian Almazan, and Jeremy Dutton. The album was hailed in Billboard as one of "The 10 Best Jazz Albums of 2018: Critic's Picks."

In 2019 she recorded in a quartet setting as part of drummer Devin Gray's Algorhythmica.

In 2017, Grand received a 2017 Jazz Gallery Residency Commission. In 2018 she was awarded a Roulette Jerome Foundation Commission, and in 2019 became an Artist-in-Residence at the Brooklyn club Roulette.

In 2018 Grand was voted Best New Artist for the 2018 Jazz Times Extended Critics Poll, and was nominated for the Jazz Journalist's Association Up-And-Coming Musician of the Year Award.

The New York Times described Grand as "an engrossing young tenor saxophonist with a zesty attack and a solid tonal range." "

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mar%C3%ADa_Grand)
11/28/2020

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"Adam O'Farrill is a trumpet player and composer from Brooklyn, NY. As a trumpeter, he has performed and/or recorded with artists such as Rudresh Mahanthappa, Mary Halvorson, Arturo O'Farrill, Mulatu Astatke, Brasstracks, Stephan Crump, Onyx Collective, Anna Webber, and Samora Pinderhughes. As a composer and bandleader, he has led the quartet, Stranger Days, comprised of Chad Lefkowitz-Brown, Walter Stinson, and Zack O'Farrill. Their eponymous debut (2016, Sunnyside Records) was inspired by film and literature, while the follow-up album, El Maquech (2018, Biophilia Records) covered everything from Mexican folk music to Irving Berlin, as well as O'Farrill's original compositions. Both were critically acclaimed, with the New York Times writing of the first release, "Marshaling a sharp band of his peers, Mr. O'Farrill establishes both a firm identity and a willful urge to stretch and adapt.". The latter album was listed as one of the best jazz albums of 2018 by the NPR Jazz Critics Poll, The Boston Globe, and Nextbop. Adam's newest project, Bird Blown Out of Latitude, is an electro-acoustic nonet, playing original music inspired by the feeling of being pushed off a perceived path.

O'Farrill comes from a rich musical background, with his grandfather being the Afro-Cuban-Irish composer and arranger Chico O'Farrill, his father being the cultural boundary-pushing composer and pianist Arturo O'Farrill, his mother Alison Deane being a classical pianist and educator, and his brother Zack O'Farrill being a drummer, composer, and educator. Adam is of Mexican, Cuban, and Irish heritage on his dad's side, and Eastern European Jewish and African-American on his mom's side. This, combined with growing up in a place of immense cultural diversity, has shaped his tendency to break stylistic borders within not only his original music, but also in terms of who he works with a sideman. O'Farrill was subject of an article in Jazztimes entitled, "Adam O'Farrill Does Not Play Latin Jazz", where he spoke about the unfair treatment and pigeonholing of Latinx musicians.

Adam made his professional recording debut on Chad Lefkowitz-Brown's debut album, Imagery Manifesto, in 2013. In 2015, he appeared on two critically acclaimed records; Rudresh Mahanthappa's Bird Calls and Arturo O'Farrill's Cuba: The Conversation Continues. Adam toured internationally with Mahanthappa's band from 2014 to 2017, performing at the Newport Jazz Festival, Chicago Symphony Hall, North Sea Jazz Festival, Cape Town International Jazz Festival, and more. In 2016, in addition to releasing Stranger Days, O'Farrill appeared on Stephan Crump's album, Rhombal, also garnering acclaim. Other projects he has recorded include Stimmerman (eponymous debut), Olli Hirvonen's New Helsinki, Gabriel Zucker's Weighting, and Onyx Collective's Lower East Suite Part One. Adam will also be featured on upcoming albums from Mary Halvorson, Anna Webber, Raf Vertessen, Thomas Champagne, and Idan Morim.

Adam studied at Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School, and obtained his Bachelor of Music degree from the Manhattan School of Music. He's studied trumpet with Jim Seeley, Nathan Warner, and Thomas Smith, and composition with Reiko Fueting and Curtis Macdonald. In 2014, O'Farrill won 3rd place honors at the Thelonious Monk Institute Jazz Trumpet Competition. He was also a recipient of the ASCAP Herb Albert Young Jazz Composer Award in 2013.

-Adam O'Farrill Website (https://www.adam-ofarrill.com/bio)
11/28/2020

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"One of improvised music's most in-demand guitarists, Mary Halvorson has been active in New York since 2002, following jazz studies at Wesleyan University and the New School. Critics have called her "a singular talent" (Lloyd Sachs, JazzTimes), "NYC's least-predictable improviser" (Howard Mandel, City Arts), "one of the most exciting and original guitarists in jazz-or otherwise" (Steve Dollar, Wall Street Journal), and "one of today's most formidable bandleaders" (Francis Davis, Village Voice). The Philadelphia City Paper's Shaun Brady adds, "Halvorson has been steadily reshaping the sound of jazz guitar in recent years with her elastic, sometimes-fluid, sometimes-shredding, wholly unique style."

After three years of study with visionary composer and saxophonist Anthony Braxton, Ms. Halvorson became an active member of several of his bands, including his trio, septet and 12+1tet. To date, she appears on six of Mr. Braxton's recordings. Ms. Halvorson has also performed alongside iconic guitarist Marc Ribot, in his bands Sun Ship and The Young Philadelphians, and with the bassist Trevor Dunn in his Trio-Convulsant. Over the past decade she has worked with such diverse bandleaders as Tim Berne, Taylor Ho Bynum, Tomas Fujiwara, Ingrid Laubrock, Myra Melford, Jason Moran, Joe Morris, Tom Rainey and Mike Reed.

As a bandleader and composer, one of Ms. Halvorson's primary outlets is her longstanding trio, featuring bassist John Hébert and drummer Ches Smith. Since their 2008 debut album, Dragon's Head, the band has been recognized as a rising star jazz band by Downbeat Magazine for five consecutive years. Ms. Halvorson's quintet, which adds trumpeter Jonathan Finlayson and alto saxophonist Jon Irabagon to the trio, has released two critically acclaimed albums on the Firehouse 12 label: Saturn Sings and Bending Bridges. Most recently she has added two additional band members-tenor saxophonist Ingrid Laubrock and trombonist Jacob Garchik-to form a septet, featured on her 2013 release Illusionary Sea. Ms. Halvorson also co-leads a longstanding chamber-jazz duo with violist Jessica Pavone, the avant-rock band People and the collective ensembles Thumbscrew and Secret Keeper."

-Mary Halvorson Website (http://www.maryhalvorson.com/bio/)
11/28/2020

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"One marker of bassist Michael Formanek's creativity and versatility is the range of distinguished musicians of several generations he's worked with. While still a teenager in the 1970s he toured with drummer Tony Williams and saxophonist Joe Henderson; starting in the '80s he played long stints with Stan Getz, Gerry Mulligan, Fred Hersch and Freddie Hubbard. (As a callback to those days, Formanek recorded with hardbop pianist Freddie Redd in 2013). The bassist has played a pivotal role on New York's creative jazz scene going back to the '90s when he notably led his own quintet and played in Tim Berne's barnstorming quartet Bloodcount. Nowadays Formanek's in the co-op Thumbscrew with Brooklyn guitarist Mary Halvorson and drummer Tomas Fujiwara.

Formanek is also a composer and leader of various bands. His principal recording and international touring vehicle is his acclaimed quartet with Tim Berne on alto saxophone, Craig Taborn on piano and Gerald Cleaver on drums, which records for ECM; 2010's The Rub and Spare Change and 2012's Small Places both earned coveted five-star raves in Down Beat. Formanek writes, and the quartet plays, compositions of great rhythmic sophistication that unfold in a natural sounding way - challenging music the players make sound like lyrical free expression. His occasional groups include the 18-piece all-star Ensemble Kolossus, roping in many New York improvisers he works with. Ensemble Kolossus recorded their first CD of all Formanek originals for the prestigious ECM label in December of 2014. The CD, The Distance was released in February 2016 and in addition to numerous other accolades also received a five-star review in Downbeat!

Formanek's other recordings as leader include Wide Open Spaces and Extended Animation for quintet and Low Profile and Nature of the Beast for seven players (all on Enja), and the solo album Am I Bothering You? (Screwgun). Mirage (Clean Feed) is by the occasional improvising trio of Formanek, tenor saxophonist Ellery Eskelin and pedal steel guitarist Susan Alcorn. Thumbscrew's 2014 debut is on Cuneiform Records. Michael Formanek has also made dozens of recordings as sideman, for among others Dave Ballou, Tim Berne, Jane Ira Bloom, Dave Burrell, Harold Danko, Marty Ehrlich, Tomas Fujiwara, Gary Thomas and Jack Walrath.

As composer of works for ensembles from duo to mixed jazz and classical orchestra, Michael Formanek has received institutional support from Chamber Music America, the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation, the Peabody Conservatory, the Maryland State Arts Council and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. As an educator, Formanek teaches bass and other jazz courses, and leads the Jazz Ensemble at Baltimore's Peabody Conservatory."

-Michael Formanek Website (http://www.amibotheringyou.com/bio.html)
11/28/2020

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"Born in Boston in 1977, Brooklyn-based drummer Tomas Fujiwara emerged during the early to mid-2000s as a valued sideman before forming his own quintet, Tomas Fujiwara & the Hook Up, which gathered accolades for blending influences such as Wayne Shorter, Taleb Kweli, and Me'Shell Ndegéocello with the experimental and unpredictable spirit of the 21st century Brooklyn creative jazz scene. After studying for eight years with drummer and educator Alan Dawson in the Boston area, Fujiwara moved to New York at the age of 17. His first performing experiences included a five-year stint beginning around the turn of the millennium with the off-Broadway show Stomp, but he also began appearing as a sideman on jazz recordings (e.g., Three Souls by the Adam Rafferty Trio in 2003) and moving in exploratory, adventurous directions.

Fujiwara developed a particularly strong collaborative relationship with New Haven, Connecticut-based cornetist Taylor Ho Bynum, whose own avant-leaning ensembles have featured a number of top Brooklyn improvising musicians. Fujiwara first appeared with Bynum on two 2007 recordings, The Middle Picture by the Taylor Ho Bynum Sextet (Firehouse 12) and True Events by the Taylor Ho Bynum/Tomas Fujiwara Duo (482 Music). During the following years, the drummer appeared on the Bynum Sextet albums Asphalt Flowers Forking Paths (hatOLOGY, 2009), Apparent Distance (Firehouse 12, 2011), and Navigation (Possibility Abstracts X & XI) (Firehouse 12, 2013), and the Bynum/Fujiwara Duo album Stepwise (Nottwo, 2010). Fujiwara is also a member of Positive Catastrophe, a ten-piece outfit co-led by Bynum and percussionist Abraham Gomez-Delgado and inspired by Sun Ra and Latin jazz; the group has released two albums on Cuneiform, Garabatos Volume One (2009) and Dibrujo, Dibrujo, Dibrujo... (2012).

Another musician with whom Fujiwara has often worked, guitarist Mary Halvorson, also often travels in the same creative orbit as Taylor Ho Bynum; like Fujiwara, Halvorson is a member of the Bynum Sextet, and along with Bynum and violist Jessica Pavone, the drummer and guitarist formed the collective quartet the Thirteenth Assembly, which has recorded two albums for the Important Records label, 2009's (un)sentimental and 2011's Station Direct. Fujiwara, Halvorson, and Bynum also appeared as members of the Chicago-New York nonet Living by Lanterns, whose New Myth/Old Science album -- based on fragments of music recorded by Sun Ra in 1961 -- appeared on Cuneiform in 2012. In 2014 Cuneiform released another album featuring Fujiwara and Halvorson, the eponymous debut of Thumbscrew, a collaborative trio also including veteran bassist Michael Formanek.

Fujiwara first assembled his Hook Up quintet in 2008, later describing the bandmembers as "some of the most important musicians in my life" -- and given all of Fujiwara and Halvorson's recorded appearances together in various settings, it was no surprise that the guitarist was in the lineup. Also featuring tenor saxophonist Brian Settles, trumpeter Jonathan Finlayson, and bassist Danton Boller, Tomas Fujiwara & the Hook Up released their debut album, Actionspeak, on 482 Music in 2010. Featuring Trevor Dunn on bass in place of Boller, the group's sophomore album, The Air Is Different, arrived (also on 482 Music) in 2012.

The many other projects in which Fujiwara has played as a collaborator or sideman include the Steve Lacy tribute band Ideal Bread, the eight-piece "bhangra funk dhol 'n' brass" outfit Red Baraat, and saxophonist/clarinetist Matt Bauder's acoustic jazz quintet. "

-All Music (http://www.allmusic.com/artist/tomas-fujiwara-mn0000909926/biography)
11/28/2020

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"Robert Wyatt (born Robert Wyatt-Ellidge, 28 January 1945) is an English musician, and founding member of the influential Canterbury scene band Soft Machine, with a long and distinguished solo career. He is married to English painter and songwriter Alfreda Benge.

Wyatt was born in Bristol. His mother was Honor Wyatt, a journalist with the BBC, and his father, George Ellidge, was an industrial psychologist. Wyatt had two half-brothers from his parents' previous marriages, Honor Wyatt's son, actor Julian Glover, and George Ellidge's son, press photographer Mark Ellidge. His parents' friends were "quite bohemian", and his upbringing was "unconventional". Wyatt said "It seemed perfectly normal to me. My father didn't join us until I was six, and he died ten years later, having retired early with multiple sclerosis, so I was brought up a lot by women." Wyatt attended the Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys, Canterbury and as a teenager lived with his parents in Lydden near Dover, where he was taught drums by visiting American jazz drummer George Neidorf. It was during this period that Wyatt met and became friends with expatriate Australian musician Daevid Allen, who rented a room in Wyatt's family home.

In 1962, Wyatt and Neidorf moved to Majorca, living near the poet Robert Graves. The following year, Wyatt returned to England and joined the Daevid Allen Trio with Allen and Hugh Hopper. Allen subsequently left for France, and Wyatt and Hopper formed the Wilde Flowers, with Kevin Ayers, Richard Sinclair and Brian Hopper. Wyatt was initially the drummer in the Wilde Flowers, but following the departure of Ayers, he also became lead singer.

In 1966, the Wilde Flowers disintegrated, and Wyatt, along with Mike Ratledge, was invited to join Soft Machine by Kevin Ayers and Daevid Allen. Wyatt both drummed and shared vocals with Ayers, an unusual combination for a stage rock band. In 1970, after chaotic touring, three albums and increasing internal conflicts in Soft Machine, Wyatt released his first solo album, The End of an Ear, which combined his vocal and multi-instrumental talents with tape effects. A year later, Wyatt left Soft Machine and, besides participating in the fusion bigband Centipede and drumming at the JazzFest Berlin's New Violin Summit, a live concert with violinists Jean-Luc Ponty, Don "Sugarcane" Harris, Michał Urbaniak and Nipso Brantner, guitarist Terje Rypdal, keyboardist Wolfgang Dauner and bassist Neville Whitehead, formed his own band Matching Mole (a pun, "machine molle" being French for 'Soft Machine'), a largely instrumental outfit that recorded two albums.

In 1966, the Wilde Flowers disintegrated, and Wyatt, along with Mike Ratledge, was invited to join Soft Machine by Kevin Ayers and Daevid Allen. Wyatt both drummed and shared vocals with Ayers, an unusual combination for a stage rock band. In 1970, after chaotic touring, three albums and increasing internal conflicts in Soft Machine, Wyatt released his first solo album, The End of an Ear, which combined his vocal and multi-instrumental talents with tape effects. A year later, Wyatt left Soft Machine and, besides participating in the fusion bigband Centipede and drumming at the JazzFest Berlin's New Violin Summit, a live concert with violinists Jean-Luc Ponty, Don "Sugarcane" Harris, Michał Urbaniak and Nipso Brantner, guitarist Terje Rypdal, keyboardist Wolfgang Dauner and bassist Neville Whitehead, formed his own band Matching Mole (a pun, "machine molle" being French for 'Soft Machine'), a largely instrumental outfit that recorded two albums.

The injury led Wyatt to abandon the Matching Mole project, and his rock drumming (though he would continue to play drums and percussion in more of a "jazz" fashion, without the use of his feet). He promptly embarked on a solo career, and with musician friends (including Mike Oldfield, Ivor Cutler and Henry Cow guitarist Fred Frith) released his solo album Rock Bottom on 26 July 1974. The album, the title of which was an oblique reference to his paraplegia, was largely composed prior to Wyatt's accident. The album was met with mostly positive reviews.

Two months later Wyatt put out a single, a cover version of "I'm a Believer", which hit number 29 in the UK chart. Both were produced by Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason. There were strong arguments with the producer of Top of the Pops surrounding Wyatt's performance of "I'm a Believer," on the grounds that his use of a wheelchair 'was not suitable for family viewing', the producer wanting Wyatt to appear on a normal chair. Wyatt won the day and 'lost his rag but not the wheelchair'. A contemporary issue of New Musical Express featured the band (a stand-in acting for Mason), all in wheelchairs, on its cover. Wyatt subsequently sang lead vocals on Mason's first solo album Fictitious Sports in 1981 (with songwriting credits going to Carla Bley).

His follow-up single, a reggae ballad remake of Chris Andrews's hit "Yesterday Man", again produced by Mason, was eventually given a low-key release, "the boss at Virgin claiming that single was 'lugubrious', the delay and lack of promotion denting Wyatt's chances of a follow-up hit."

Wyatt's next solo album, Ruth Is Stranger Than Richard (1975), produced by Wyatt apart from one track produced by Mason, was more jazz-led, with free jazz influences. Guest musicians included Brian Eno on guitar, synthesizer and "direct inject anti-jazz ray gun". Wyatt went on to appear on the fifth release of Eno's Obscure Records label, Jan Steele/John Cage: Voices and Instruments (1976), singing two Cage songs.

Throughout the rest of the 1970s Wyatt guested with various acts, including Henry Cow (documented on their Concerts album), Hatfield and the North, Carla Bley, Eno, Michael Mantler, and Roxy Music guitarist Phil Manzanera, contributing lead vocals to lead track "Frontera", from Manzanera's 1975 solo debut Diamond Head. In 1976 he was featured vocalist on Michael Mantler's settings of the poems of Edward Gorey, appearing alongside Terje Rypdal (guitar) Carla Bley (piano, clavinet, synthesizer), Steve Swallow (bass) and Jack DeJohnette (drums) on the album 'The Hapless Child and Other Stories'.

His solo work during the early 1980s was increasingly politicised, and Wyatt became a member of the Communist Party of Great Britain. In 1983, his original version of Elvis Costello and Clive Langer's Falklands War-inspired song "Shipbuilding", which followed a series of political cover-versions (collected as Nothing Can Stop Us), reached number 35 in the UK Singles Chart and number 2 in John Peel's Festive Fifty for tracks from that year. In 1984 Wyatt provided guest vocals, along with Tracey Thorn and Claudia Figueroa, on "Venceremos" (We Will Win), a song expressing political solidarity with Chilean people suffering under Pinochet's military dictatorship, released as a single by UK soul-jazz dance band Working Week, also included on an album released the following year.

In 1985 Wyatt released Old Rottenhat, his first album of original songs since Rock Bottom. The album featured strongly political songs with relatively sparse arrangements played largely by Wyatt alone.

In the late 1980s, after collaborations with other acts such as News from Babel, Scritti Politti, and Japanese recording artist Ryuichi Sakamoto, he and his wife Alfreda Benge spent a sabbatical in Spain, before returning in 1991 with a comeback album Dondestan. His 1997 album Shleep was also praised.

In 1999 he collaborated with the Italian singer Cristina Donà on her second album Nido. In the summer of 2000 her first EP Goccia was released and Wyatt made an appearance in the video of the title track.

Wyatt contributed "Masters of the Field", as well as "The Highest Gander", "La Forêt Rouge" and "Hors Champ" to the soundtrack of the 2001 film Winged Migration. He can be seen in the DVD's Special Features section, and is praised by the film's composer Bruno Coulais as being a big influence in his younger days. [...]"

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Wyatt)
11/28/2020

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track listing:


1. Lemon Trees 7:16

2. Last-Minute Smears 8:59

3. Walls And Roses 3:35

4. Muzzling Unwashed 10:52

5. Bigger Flames 5:17

6. Mexican War Streets (Pittsburgh) 10:41

7. A Nearing 10:29

8. Artlessly Falling 7:18
sample the album:








descriptions, reviews, &c.

"Aside from her most obvious musical talents, including her phenomenal guitar chops and her budding talent as a lyricist, Mary Halvorson has a special gift for understanding the abilities of her bandmates and drawing out their strengths to the fullest. Part of it is the way she tends to keep the same company in her assorted projects: bassist Michael Formanek and drummer Tomas Fujiwara are the leading examples, having recorded extensively with her in their trio Thumbscrew, as heard on their recent Anthony Braxton Project (Cuneiform, 2020), while she has in turn joined them on their own endeavors. But it's also her knack for identifying a key addition here and there that can lead to a leap in her music's evolution. Witness for instance the difference pedal steel guitarist Susan Alcorn made in transforming Halvorson's established septet to an octet on 2016's Away With You (Firehouse 12). Alcorn brought the nuance and texture that lent a new dimension to Halvorson's complex compositions, proving that Halvorson's writing process doesn't occur in a vacuum, but is always taking shape in conversation with her partners.

Artlessly Falling, the second release by Halvorson's Code Girl, is another window into Halvorson's unfailing instincts for finding the right people for the right project. The group's outstanding self-titled debut in 2018 (Firehouse 12) teamed Halvorson, Fujiwara, and Formanek with trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire and vocalist Amirtha Kidambi in a quintet that expertly merged prog-rock and avant-jazz. Now Halvorson has augmented that original lineup with a couple pivotal changes: while keeping a trumpet in the mix (only now played by Adam O'Farrill instead of Akinmusire), she's added tenor saxophonist Maria Grand, who also joins Kidambi occasionally on vocals. And then, not to be outdone, there are three cameos by Robert Wyatt, the grizzled veteran of England's Canterbury scene whose presence here (after a recording hiatus begun in 2014) is itself noteworthy, in addition to being an explicit acknowledgement of Halvorson's debt to Wyatt in her own development as a songwriter.

One detects Grand's role from the opening track onward, as her voice harmonizes skillfully with Kidambi as a backdrop to Wyatt's fragile vulnerability on "The Lemon Trees." There's a somewhat more buoyant feel to this music than what is found on the group's debut, and this is largely due to the way Halvorson has brought Grand into the group. Although her vocal presence is sometimes subtle, and she doesn't get any show-stopping saxophone solos, the ensemble passages in which her tenor complements O'Farrill's lyrical trumpet are powerful, as one hears on "Bigger Flames," a lovely vehicle for Wyatt made all the more compelling by O'Farrill's and Grand's entwined lines. The two-horn harmonies on "Mexican War Streets (Pittsburgh)" are just as effective, lending a gentle grace to the music. If the music is somewhat less fluid and more tautly constructed than the freer feel of the debut, it's certainly just as captivating and perhaps even more addictive. And for those craving some tough-edged riffs, the album offers that too, on the relatively brief but memorable "Walls and Roses," where the guitarist unleashes a furious burst of distortion-laden heaviness over the band's punishing groove.

Halvorson's lyrics reflect her trademark care and attention to detail, using a variety of structures and methods that somehow conform perfectly to the musical shape of each piece. The themes tend to be rather dark-"daggered hands," "muzzling unwashed thoughts," "charred Russian dolls" and the like conjure bleak worlds indeed-which makes it all the more remarkable that the music typically stays so light on its feet. Halvorson even ventures into political territory on the disarming "Last-Minute Smears," a clever appropriation of testimony from the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation hearings, in which Kidambi's inimitable hyper-expressive delivery captures all the madness of that troubled episode (and Fujiwara's tongue-in-cheek "beer can" percussion provides additional ambience).

Knowing Halvorson's collaborative modus operandi, it's not at all unlikely that she'll have some new surprises in store for the next release from Code Girl. As this has become one of her most exciting and creative outlets, that will be good news indeed."-Troy Dostert, All About Jazz


Get additional information at All About Jazz
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Warriors of the Wonderful Sound Expanded Ensemble, The
Soundpath
(Clean Feed)
Wyatt, Robert
His Greatest Misses [VINYL + DOWNLOAD]
(Domino Record Co.)
Wyatt, Robert
His Greatest Misses
(Domino Record Co.)
Kidambi, Amirtha / Lea Bertucci
End of Softness [CASSETTE w/ DOWNLOAD]
(Astral Spirits)
Webber / Morris Big Band
Both Are True
(Greenleaf Music)
Henry Cow
The Henry Cow Box Redux: The Complete Henry Cow [17 CDs, 1 DVD, 250pg Book]
(Recommended Records)
Bynum, Taylor Ho 9-tette
The Ambiguity Manifesto [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Bynum, Taylor Ho 9-tette
The Ambiguity Manifesto
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Formanek, Michael Very Practical Trio (w/ Tim Berne / Mary Halvorson)
Even Better
(Intakt)
Nabatov, Simon Quintet (w/ Malaby / Seabrook / Formanek / Cleaver)
Last Minute Theory
(Clean Feed)
Douglas, Dave
Showing Up / The Power of the Vote [7" VINYL]
(Greenleaf Music)
Fujiwara, Tomas
Triple Double [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Gray, Devin / Ellery Eskelin / Michael Formanaek / Dave Ballou
Dirigo Rataplan II
(Rataplan Records)
Rainey, Tom Trio (w/ Laubrock / Halvorson)
Combobulated
(Intakt)
Laubrock, Ingrid (w/ Halvorson / Davis / Wooley)
Contemporary Chaos Practices - Two Works For Orchestra With Soloists
(Intakt)
Halvorson, Mary / Joe Morris
Traversing Orbits
(RogueArt)
Sacks, Jacob
Fishes
(Clean Feed)
Thumbscrew (Michael Formanek / Tomas Fujiwara / Mary Halvorson)
Theirs
(Cuneiform Records)
Thumbscrew (Michael Formanek / Tomas Fujiwara / Mary Halvorson)
Ours
(Cuneiform Records)
Parker, William
Voices Fall From The Sky [3 CD BOX SET]
(Aum Fidelity)
Halvorson, Mary
Away With You [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Sanchez, Angelica Trio (w/ Michael Formanek / Tyshawn Sorey)
Float the Edge
(Clean Feed)
Courvoisier, Sylvie / Mary Halvorson
Crop Circles
(Relative Pitch)
Thumbscrew (Halvorson / Formanek / Fujiwara)
Convallaria
(Cuneiform)
Halvorson, Mary
Meltframe
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Halvorson, Mary
Reverse Blue
(Relative Pitch)
Fujiwara, Tomas Trio
Variable Bets
(Relative Pitch)
Mickens, Sam
Kayfabe: Lamb of G.O.D.
(Sam Mickens)
Bauder, Matt and Day in Pictures
Nightshades
(Clean Feed)
Bynum, Taylor Ho
Navigation (Possibility Abstracts XII & XIII) [2 CDs]
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Cady, Jason
Happiness Is The Problem
(Lock Step Records)
Halvorson, Mary Septet
Illusionary Sea
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Braxton, Anthony Steptet (with Ho Bynum / Halvorson / Pavone / Rozen / Siegel / Testa)
Echo Echo Mirror House
(Les Disques Victo)
Halvorson, Mary / Kirk Knuffke / Matt Wilson
Sifter
(Relative Pitch)
Halvorson, Mary
Bending Bridges [2 VINYL LPs]
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Morris, Joe
Perpetual Frontier The Properties of Free Music [BOOK]
(Riti Publishing)
AYCH (Jim Hobbs, Mary Halvorson, Taylor Ho Bynum)
As The Crow Flies
(Relative Pitch)
Bynum Sextet, Taylor Ho
Apparent Distance
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Bauder, Matt
Day in Pictures
(Clean Feed)
Arguelles, Julian Trio
Ground Rush
(Clean Feed)
Ideal Bread
Transmit: Vol. 2 of The Music of Steve Lacy
(Cuneiform)
Halvorson Trio, Mary
Dragon's Head
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Halvorson / Radding / Wooley
Crackleknob
(Hatology)
Ideal Bread (Sinton / Knuffke / Radding / Fujiwara)
The Ideal Bread
(KMB Jazz)
Braxton, Anthony
Trio (Victoriaville) 2007
(Les Disques Victo)
Braxton, Anthony
9 Compositions (Iridium) 2006 [DVD]
(Firehouse 12 Records)
New York Underground Orchestra, The
Fragments
(Hopscotch Records)
Recommended & Related Releases:
Warriors of the Wonderful Sound Expanded Ensemble, The
Soundpath
(Clean Feed)
Wyatt, Robert
His Greatest Misses [VINYL + DOWNLOAD]
(Domino Record Co.)
Webber / Morris Big Band
Both Are True
(Greenleaf Music)
Henry Cow
The Henry Cow Box Redux: The Complete Henry Cow [17 CDs, 1 DVD, 250pg Book]
(Recommended Records)
Bynum, Taylor Ho 9-tette
The Ambiguity Manifesto [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Bynum, Taylor Ho 9-tette
The Ambiguity Manifesto
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Nabatov, Simon Quintet (w/ Malaby / Seabrook / Formanek / Cleaver)
Last Minute Theory
(Clean Feed)
Douglas, Dave
Showing Up / The Power of the Vote [7" VINYL]
(Greenleaf Music)
Fujiwara, Tomas
Triple Double [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Rainey, Tom Trio (w/ Laubrock / Halvorson)
Combobulated
(Intakt)
Laubrock, Ingrid (w/ Halvorson / Davis / Wooley)
Contemporary Chaos Practices - Two Works For Orchestra With Soloists
(Intakt)
Sacks, Jacob
Fishes
(Clean Feed)
Thumbscrew (Michael Formanek / Tomas Fujiwara / Mary Halvorson)
Theirs
(Cuneiform Records)
Parker, William
Voices Fall From The Sky [3 CD BOX SET]
(Aum Fidelity)
Sanchez, Angelica Trio (w/ Michael Formanek / Tyshawn Sorey)
Float the Edge
(Clean Feed)
Courvoisier, Sylvie / Mary Halvorson
Crop Circles
(Relative Pitch)
Thumbscrew (Halvorson / Formanek / Fujiwara)
Convallaria
(Cuneiform)
Fujiwara, Tomas Trio
Variable Bets
(Relative Pitch)
Mickens, Sam
Kayfabe: Lamb of G.O.D.
(Sam Mickens)
Bauder, Matt and Day in Pictures
Nightshades
(Clean Feed)
Bynum, Taylor Ho
Navigation (Possibility Abstracts XII & XIII) [2 CDs]
(Firehouse 12 Records)
Cady, Jason
Happiness Is The Problem
(Lock Step Records)
Braxton, Anthony Steptet (with Ho Bynum / Halvorson / Pavone / Rozen / Siegel / Testa)
Echo Echo Mirror House
(Les Disques Victo)
Halvorson, Mary / Kirk Knuffke / Matt Wilson
Sifter
(Relative Pitch)
Morris, Joe
Perpetual Frontier The Properties of Free Music [BOOK]
(Riti Publishing)
AYCH (Jim Hobbs, Mary Halvorson, Taylor Ho Bynum)
As The Crow Flies
(Relative Pitch)

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