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© 2002-2020, Squidco LLC


Trapist (Brandlmayr / Siewert / Williamson): Highway My Friend (Hatology)


 

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product information:


UPC: 752156058625

Label: Hatology
Catalog ID: Hatology586
Squidco Product Code: 9857

Format: CD
Condition: New
Released: 2002
Country: Switzerland
Packaging: Cardstock Gatefold Sleeve
Recorded live at Rhiz Vienna on October 5, 2000 by Christina Bauer and Martin Siewert.


Personnel:

Martin Brandlmayr-drums, percussion

Martin Siewert-guitar, lapsteel, electronics

Joe Williamson-bass, trackball

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Artist Biographies:

"Martin Brandlmayr is an Austrian percussionist, drummer, composer and electronic artist.

He is widely recognized for his work in a variety of so-called "post-rock" bands, namely Radian, Trapist, and Autistic Daughters, among others. Critic Brian Olewnick has called Brandlmayr's work "extraordinarily precise".

Among others, Brandlmayr has recorded or performed with John Tilbury, Fennesz, Chad Taylor, and Otomo Yoshihide.

He was artist in residence 2002 at Podewil, Berlin. He now lives in Vienna, Austria and is an active member of Polwechsel."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Brandlmayr)
7/8/2020

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Martin Siewert (born 11 May 1972) is a German guitarist and film composer.

Siewert has been living in Vienna since the age of 10. He studied guitar at the University of Music and Performing Arts Graz. As a guitarist, he started his public performances in 1995. In his early performances, he played with Herwig Gradischnig, Freier Fall, Franz Hautzinger, and his band Duckbilled Platypus. With this band, he recorded two albums for the label Extraplatte.

He began to separated himself from the jazz idiom and developed an abstract sound on guitar. He became a member of Efzeg with Burkherd Stangl and Hauf and Komfort. He invited Dafeldecker, Hinteregger, Wayne Horvitz and Tony Buck to the group Komfort. In the group Trapist, he played with Joe Williamson and Martin Brandlmayr. On My Kingdom for a Lullably, he played with Christof Kurzmann, Axel Drner, and Billy Roisz, the video artist of Efzeg. He was a member of the guitar quartet SSSD with Taku Sugimoto, Werner Dafeldecker, and Burkhard Stangl.

He has worked with Oskar Aichinger, Christian Fennesz, Wolfgang Mitterer, Elliott Sharp, Franz Koglmann, Thomas Lehn, Karlheinz Essl, Ken Vandermark, Michael Sarin, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Kammerflimmer Kollektief, Georg Grwe, Frank Gratkowski, Michael Vatcher, and Klangforum Wien. He has composed music for, ballet, film, theater, remix recordings, and sound art."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Siewert)
7/8/2020

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

Born 1970 in Canada, Joe Williamson has toured the world as a bass player in various setting and He moved to Europe in 1992 and has lived in Amsterdam, Berlin and London, and Stockholm. Projects include The Inconvenience, Trapist, Alex Ward and The Dead Ends, Tobias Delius 4tet, Weird Weapons, the Duck Baker Trio, King of Herrings, The Green Valley Players, Booklet, The 7 Seas Orchestra,The Wardrobe Trio... Past and present collaborators include Duck Baker, Steve Beresford, &c.

-Squidco 7/8/2020

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.
track listing:


1. Mascoma 8:57

2. FM 9:32

3. Impex 7:59

4. E101 12:52

5. Mine Was The Shoulder You Cried On That Day 4:22

6. Fenrus 6:54

7. Mile 6:47
descriptions, reviews, &c.

"Faith in wide time frames and a preference for self-supporting structures allow the musicians to dispense with fixed patterns or forms. In doing so, they create this hybrid music, which defies explanation in the discourse of both the improvisers, even the free ones, and the composers, even those who stick to open formats. This is a matter of an interwoven three-step. The single steps aren't really new, they are, however, applied without compromise, fragmented further, and questioned not matter what. Thus they throw a new light upon the creation of music: the need to employ an aesthetic filter, the development of supporting structures, and the possibilities of storing and repeating."-Christian Scheib, from the liner notes



"This trio chose their name well; although they haven't quite taken a vow of silence, they get pretty close to it at times. If Trapist are a power trio (and a casual glance at the guitar, bass, drums lineup might lead you to think so), they're running on an ancient car battery rather than the national grid.

This deliberate, sparse improv is about what isn't played as much as anything else. If Morton Feldman, John Cage and David Tudor had formed a rock band, they might have sounded a bit like this. On the opening tracks, Martin Siewert's minimalist guitar is hardly there; faint pencil strokes of melody or resonant drones are framed by clicks, buzzes and static. Martin Brandlmayr's drumming is as much about texture as rhythm, while Joe Williamson's bass adds a warm, dark throb.

Williamson is also credited with 'trackball'. Whether this is connected to a laptop or not isn't made clear, but occasionally more obviously electronic elements creep in, though what generates them isn't clear either. "Impex" appears to feature a modem undergoing torture, and many of the sounds here resemble equipment malfunction as much as anything else. As the album goes on Trapist get progressively less interested in silence, engaging in comparatively hyperactive exchanges which hum with a repressed, focussed energy, sometimes settling into spare, sinewy grooves.

Siewert's guitar is alternately abstract scrabble or desolate, almost bluesy in best John Fahey mode. This is best heard on the fragile "Mine Was The Shoulder You Cried On That Day", where he carefully places long, mournful notes over a soft, tumbling bed of drums and bass. It's the most conventionally beautiful moment on a CD stuffed with moments of stranger, alien beauties. Brilliant stuff."-Peter Marsh - BBC online



This album has been review on our magazine:

The Squid
The Squid's Ear!
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Electro-Acoustic
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Trio Recordings
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