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Okkyung Lee / Christian Marclay: Amalgam (Northern Spy)

A wild and exciting duo between cellist Okkyung Lee and legendary turntable improviser Christian Marclay performing live at London's Cafe Oto for a single long track that runs through a astonishing dynamic of invention and atmospheres in a gripping and spellbinding set. ... Click to View


Okkyung Lee / Christian Marclay: Amalgam [VINYL] (Northern Spy)

A wild and exciting duo between cellist Okkyung Lee and legendary turntable improviser Christian Marclay performing live at London's Cafe Oto for a single long track that runs through a astonishing dynamic of invention and atmospheres in a gripping and spellbinding set. ... Click to View


Saint Francis Duo: Los Bordes De Las Respuestas (Dropa Disc)

The Saint Francis Duo of Stephen O'Malley (Sunn O))), KTL) and Steve Noble (Rip, Rig and Panic, Brotzmann, Parker, Edwards ...) present a tour-de-force of darkly improvised drone and doom in a studio album of violently dark guitar work and ferocious drumming. ... Click to View


John Escreet (w/ Evan Parker / John Hebert / Tyshawn Sorey): The Unknown (Live in Concert) (Sunnyside Records)

Pianist John Escreet brought his trio with drummer Tyshawn Sorey and bassist John Hebert on a tour of Europe in 2016, meeting with British saxophonist Evan Parker in Amsterdam's Bimhuis and at Rotterdam's Lantaren Venster to record these profound performances of free improvisation. ... Click to View


Frank Schubert Paul / Rudi Fischerlehner: Willing Suspension of Disbelief (Not Applicable)

Long-time collaborators and compatriots Frank Paul Schubert on soprano sax and Rudi Fischerlehner on drums and percussion recorded these intricate and engaging improvisations in their shared studio in Berlin, presented as a live album, unedited and in the order performed. ... Click to View


Silver / Sanders / Wheatley: NAX/XUS (Confront)

Performing together since 2014, the free improvising trio of Yoni Silver on bass clarinet, Mark Sanders on drums, and Tom Wheatley on double bass are captured live at the Hundred Years Gallery in London, in 2015 for a dark and spacious journey in two large improvisations. ... Click to View


Porta Chiusa: Because Life Should Be So Wonderful (I) (Herbal International)

A beguiling and atmospheric work of overtones, harmonics, tonal and microtonal progressions from a trio of clarinetists (Hans Koch, Michael Thieke, and Paed Conca) with Japanese vocalist Maki Hachiya, an immaculately paced and exotic work of sound. ... Click to View


Jean-Luc Guionnet / Dedalus: Distances Ouies Dites (Potlatch)

Composer Jean-Luc Guionnet wrote "Distances ouies Dites" ("Distances: Hearsay") for the 7-piece Dedalus Ensemble, who are positioned in separate rooms at Le Consortium, each having to use the features of the room and distance from each other to confer liked musical ideas. ... Click to View


Jack Wright : Thaw (Spring Garden Music)

12 improvisations representing various groupings with saxophonist Jack Wright, including solo work on alto and soprano, a duo with trombonist Stan Nishamura, six trios with 2 different groups, and a sextet; a great introduction to his diverse interests and exploratory nature. ... Click to View


Jack Wright: Rattle OK & Rattle Still OK (Spring Garden Music)

Combining two albums from free improvising saxophonist Jack Wright's 1999-2000 tour across North America, presenting music in various configurations with Bob Marsh, Tom Djll, Bhob Rainey, John Shiurba, Matthew Sperry, Ben Wright, Greg Kelley, Bob Wagner, Joe Giardullo, &c. &c. ... Click to View


Morton Feldman : For John Cage (Hat [now] ART)

Morton Feldman was a friend, flatmate and student of John Cage's innovative approaches to composition; he wrote this 3 part work for violin and piano in 1982 as a 70th birthday present for Cage, here performed by violinist Josje Fosie Ter Haar and pianist John Snijders. ... Click to View


Morton Feldman : Patterns In A Chromatic Field [2 CDs] (Hat [now] ART)

Feldman's idiosyncratic large composition is also one of his more active, influenced by John Cage, and using a score that defines organizational procedures in chordal and chromatic patterns, as realized in this '93 recording by Rohan de Saram (cello) and Marianne Schroeder (piano). ... Click to View


Katharina Rosenberger : SHIFT (Hat [now] ART)

First recordings of composer Katharnia Rosenberger's SHIFT and other dynamic and exciting works incorporating spatialization, by an electroacoustic orchestra including Rage Thrombones captured in 2016 at the University of California, in San Diego, California. ... Click to View


John Butcher / Thomas Lehn / Matthew Shipp: Tangle (Fataka)

After "Exta", where saxophonist John Butcher and electronics artist Thomas Lehn met with pianist John Tilbury, the duo now meet with New York pianist Matthew Shipp for a distinct improvisational entanglement of Butcher's dense streams, Lehn's rich sound floor, and Shipp's thick repetitions. ... Click to View


Michel Edelin's Flute Fever Orchestra with special guest Nicole Mitchell: Kalamania [2 CDs] (RogueArt)

French flutist Michel Edelin leads this 6-piece band named in honor of Jeremy Steig, with 4 flutists including Sylvaine Helary, Ludivine Issambourg, and Nicole Mitchell, plus John Betsch (drums) and Peter Giron (bass) in exceptional, unexpected and inclusive approaches to improv. ... Click to View


Anthony Braxton / Miya Masaoka: Duo (Dcwm) 2013 [2 CDs] (RogueArt)

Two performers who have stretched the boundaries of their instruments--Miya Masaoka on 12-string koto and Anthony Braxton on saxophones and software-based electronics--in subtle and unusual environments where each player fills the phrases of the other in unforseen ways. ... Click to View


Corsano / Courviosier / Wooley: Salt Task (Relative Pitch)

First recorded meeting of Chris Corsano (drums), Sylvie Courvoisier (piano), and Nate Wooley (trumpet) in the studio in Brookly, 2015, for a completely open, sensitive set of improvisations that are constantly on the edge, at times explosive, and always in a focused dialog. ... Click to View


HMZ (Hubsch / Martel / Zoubek): Drought (Tour de Bras)

A live performance at the Loft in Cologne, Germany, 2015 from the recording and performing trio of Carl Ludwig Hubsch on tuba & objects, Pierre Yves Martel on viola da Gamba & harmonica, and Philip Zoubek on the prepared piano, restrained yet highly active playing. ... Click to View


The Wire: #395 January 2016 [MAGAZINE] (The Wire)

Wire's essential annual survey of the last 12 months of key underground music activity in 26 pages of crucial charts and critical comment, including 50 new releases of the year and 50 archive releases of the year, plus writers and artists review the previous cultural year. ... Click to View


The Wire: #394 December 2016 [MAGAZINE] (The Wire)

December 2016 issue of the essential UK new music magazine with: Spirits Rejoice!; NON Invisible Jukebox with Dagmar Krause; Pamelia Stickney; Magnetoceptia; Kill Alters; Chris Cobilis; Bonaventure; Global Ear Taipei; Oliver Coates on Mike Nelson; and Epiphanies: Richard Pinhas. ... Click to View


Keith Rowe : The Room Extended [4 CDs] (erstwhile)

A massive and rewarding work of organized sound extending ea-improviser, AMM guitarist Keith Rowe's work "The Room" into a massive 4 CD set of compositions, layering work familiar from his recent improvisations with classical compositions, field recordings, &c. &c. ... Click to View


Taku Unami / Devin DiSanto: Taku Unami / Devin DiSanto (erstwhile)

A live performance at Fridman Gallery in New York City as part of erstwhile's AMPLIFY 2015 festival from sound artists Taku Unami & Devin DiSanto, using electronics, concrete sounds, and spoken word to create a diverse active environments of narratives and pure sound. ... Click to View


DNA: A Taste Of DNA [12-inch VINYL] (Superior Viaduct)

An essential part of the late 70's influential Downtown NY scene, the trio of Arto Lindsay (guitar and voice), Ikue Mori (drums), and Tim Wright (bass), released few albums, but this 1981 EP captures the essence of their tightly controlled manic approach to wildly improvised rock. ... Click to View


Epitaphs: Epitaphs [CASSETTE] (Wee Space Tapes)

New York City poet Colleen McCarthy & drummer David Grollman both read and improvise on McCarthy's book of short verses, "Epitaphs", honoring the deceased and the not-dead-yet who suffer(ed) variously psychoses and suicide, with Grollman accompanying on snare drum. ... Click to View


Christof Kurzmann / Mats Gustafsson: Falling And Five Other Failings (Trost Records)

Two versatile and innovative improvisers, Mats Gustafsson on saxophones and Christof Kurzmann on electronics and voice, extracted improvisations recorded in the studio to create the 7 parts of this rich, pulse-based and intensely understated work about Falling and Failing. ... Click to View


Okkyung Lee / Lasse Marhaug: Jukebox-Series 006 [7-inch VINYL] (Trost Records)

An unusual duo of electro-acoustic improv from cellist Okkyung Lee and sound artist Lasse Marhaug, extending Trost's Jukebox series of 7" releases with two tracks of extreme playing recorded with no overdubs and minimal editing, mastered by Martin Siewert. ... Click to View


Pita & Chra: Jukebox-Series 005 [7-inch VINYL] (Trost Records)

Christina Nemec and Peter Rehberg, members of Shampoo Boy, here as a duo under the Pita & Chra moniker in compelling sound work of sinoid rhythms and eerie electronic noise, great textural work in a tapestry of unusual sound mastered by Martin Siewert. ... Click to View


Borbetomagus: The Eastcote Studios Session [VINYL] (Dancing Wayang)

A rare studio album from the aggressive and influential free improv trio Borbetomagus of saxophonists Jim Sauter & Don Dietrich and guitarist Donald Miller, recorded in London in 2014, and described by Sauter himself as "unlike anything we've ever recorded before". ... Click to View


Jeff Parker: Slight Freedom (Eremite)

Chicago/West Coast guitarist and Tortoise mainstay Jeff Parker in, surprisingly, his first solo guitar album, in four beautifully moody and atmospheric improvisations including Frank Ocean's "Super Rich Kids", Neil Young's ""Discreet Music"" and Billy Strayhorn's "Lush Life". ... Click to View


Eyvind Kang / Jessika Kenney: Reverse Tree [VINYL] (Black Truffle)

One large work each from Eyvind Kang (viola) and Jessika Kenney (voice), Kang presenting a chamber work inspired by a text by the Tang dynasty poet Hsueh T'ao with a large ensemble; Kenney using an ensemble of strings alongside Seattle's Gamelan Pacifica, performing on Javanese instruments. ... Click to View


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  Singing at the Threshold  

Kali Fasteau's Lifetime of Listening and Playing


By James Keepnews 2003-12-15

I lived on four continents to experience many concepts of the divine in music. Sound creates reality as it moves through time. It is important for me to let the life energy create freely in the full magic of the moment without premeditating on form. Musicians study form to learn how to embody sound with grace and energy. The ultimate goal is formlessness, to manifest grace and energy in all our actions, and to offer the gift of a fresh expression of the infinite present with love and compassion. The form of the music can be seen after the fact of its creation. I choose to perform on the threshold of the unknown. - Kali Z. Fasteau


I should know better than to trust a map to find her.

In our email correspondence leading up to my visit, Fasteau offered to give me directions but Natty Bumpo insisted on a prevalent inelegance, viz. the transformation of websites into verbs, and tried to find her house by "Mapquesting" its address. My bad - turn-offs can't be found, roads meant to be turned onto after previous turns show up early, etc. Backtracking, with more hope than intuition, Brought me into the Orange County backwoods of the perfectly-named Balmville, NY and, eventually to her home.

"Her" being Kali Z. Fasteau, as she is known today. Discographers, record collectors and other lovers of fine art and its alphabetizing might still know her best, if at all, as Zusaan Kali Fasteau, as she was billed on her recordings as recently as 1997. To musicians, however, she's always been Kali Fasteau, and she laughs when I remark on the name change on her albums - it's a conscious effort on her part and, soon, she insists, "all that will be left is 'Kali.Z'!".

However she is named, Kali Fasteau is an inimitable presence is creative music. In a music whose appreciation of its female practitioners is still rare, Kali is all the more unique, but her contributions resist easy pigeonholing, much as finding her residence resisted cartography. To call her one of the most accomplished female multi-instrumentalists in free music specifically, and musics associated with "jazz" generally, still feels like putting too fine a point on her abilities. For starters, those multiple instruments aren’t your standard jazzers’ swapping of reeds, either, but a worldwide collection of reeds, keyboards, string instruments and percussion from many different cultures - a short list would read soprano saxophone, piano, cello, ney, balafon, kaval, mizmar, shakuhachi, moursin, sanza, sheng, drums and the incomparable vocal stylings she characterizes as “international vocalese.” Her global odyssey, one seemingly as spiritual as it was musical, across two decades, where she lived and studied in many different countries, including Haiti, Turkey, India, Nepal, and many European nations makes her a singular authority on musical practice across those cultures; the degree to which these cultures have helped shape her range of expression is nearly immeasurable. There's also her early embrace of musican-owned record labels with Flying Note. These distinctions are fueled by a deep appreciation of the divine in all aspects her musical process, leavened with a radical political consciousness also developed and practiced over the decades. There's no one quite like her in any music, anywhere.

Fasteau was gracious as she greeted me, and almost apologetically invited me into her marvelous home. "I'm used to sleeping on the shores of the Indian Ocean," she said with a calm smile. "This is still new for me." Laid out in an open, quasi-Japanese single level, replete with long rooms surrounded by windows which look out upon her sylvan property, the outside feels inside, and the inside out. The analogy is inevitable.

Metaphors are probably too easy to come by with an artist of Kali's accomplishment and global perspective - but they're there for anyone to see. Her music is an uncanny distillation of traditional and spontaneous, refinement and fire, inside and out. And no single map can guide you there - ragas on soprano saxophone can lead to blues on the Turkish flute (or ney) leading to feral vocalized wails that can descend, precisely, into pitch. Far from a scattered aesthetic, Fasteau has absorbed her extraordinarily far-flung experience to make a bracing, unified and emotionally sophisticated music that doesn't lack for resources, spiritual or instrumental.

Raised in Paris to an accomplished musical family, Fasteau recalled a youth filled with music and music making.

“My mother’s father was a cellist in the New Jersey Symphony, and had also played cornet in the Russian army," she said. "His oldest daughter, my mother’s sister, was an opera singer, composer and conductor, which was very rare back in those days. She did programs at Carnegie Hall. My first year and a half I lived in my grandfather's house, and so I heard and saw the cello being played, right in front me, as an infant. That was, I think, very important - I mean, the sound of the cello, and the bass and strings is very close to me.”

Her formal musical training started at a very early age on piano. By fourth grade, she was studying cello; by seventh, she began flute, while maintaining her studies on the other instruments. Multi-instrumentalism, then, played a decisive aspect early in Kali's musical development, and her facility on these and subsequent instruments, she said, isn't unusual as a result. “It's like when children grow up speaking several languages, it's normal for them to switch languages - it's like nothing. So, the same being a multi-instrumentalist as a kid. It's not a big thing to change from one to another.”

Along with the Western classical influences surrounding her from an early age, Fasteau had the opportunity to hear music closer to the sensibilities she would develop over the years. “My girlfriend when I was in second grade, she had some records of Miriam Makeba," she said. "She turned me on to Miriam Makeba when I was 7 or 8 and I just loved her music. That was my first experience with non-Western music, as far as I can consciously recall. That was a really important influence. My brother had alot of jazz records, too -- Bobby Timmons, Miles, Ahmad Jamal, he had a lot of good records. So, I feel a feeling for jazz early, too."

She also recalls an experience featuring the bedrock of her musical style today and one that strikes fear in the heart of most “formally-trained” musicians: improvisation. “When I was about fourteen, I had a dream that I was playing at a recital -- classical music, playing some Bach -- and I forgot what I was supposed to play and I just made up some music on the spot, and it worked out fine. I dreamt that I was improvising. And then, the next day, I tried it, and I started to figure out how to improvise.”

Her politics slowly began to reveal a radical edge, sharpened by her attendance at the legendary March on Washington in 1963. The following year, she attended Reed College, where she earned a degree in social anthropology while minoring in music. Certain students helped shape her understanding of jazz and r&b and spending summers in Georgia and Louisiana as part of voter drives organized by such radical student groups as CORE and SCLC helped shape her emerging revolutionary consciousness. By 1968, she had already spent time working with the Oakland branch of the Black Panthers and went from that experience to graduate school in music at Wesleyan University. The culture shock was enormous. One wonders whether any traditional Western educational system could have provided Kali with a satisfactory pedagogy with the direction her life was going but, as Fasteau described it, just being in Middletown, CT for her studies was only too redolent of her days with CORE.

“I had this really rebellious spirit," she said. "I almost didn't even go to graduate school, I was really in this revolutionary mode. So, when I got to Wesleyan...Middletown, CT was set up like a southern town, with a black part and a white part, there were hardly any women there, very few women in the grad program. It was too retro for me.”

Still, she did have a chance to study music from other cultures, as well as contemporary classical music. Moreover, Middletown's proximity to New York meant that she had a chance to take in so much of what was available there as the 60s gave way to 1970, when Kali eventually graduated and moved to the city. She left for San Francisco in late 1971 where she met Donald Rafael Garett, the multi-instrumentalist best known for his contributions to a series of West Coast recordings by John Coltrane (Om, Live in Seattle, Kulu Se Mama and Selflessness) on which he played both bass and bass clarinet.

It was, says Kali, "love at first sight – lightning struck and everything!" Speaking about him today, Kali's abiding love and respect for the late musician, composer, philosopher and polymath is palpable.

“He was very advanced,” Kali recalls, “Rafael was a genius in many areas of intellectual life. He taught me how to make bamboo flutes, shakuhachi, he taught me T'ai Chi Chuan, macrobiotic cooking, he was up on many of the latest philosophies of the time, like Gurdjieff. The way he was, he was always sharing his knowledge with whoever was around.”

They began playing together immediately, eventually recording Kali's first appearance on record, the ESP-Disk release by the Sea Ensemble, aka Rafael and Kali. By 1974, they were married and their global journey had begun, having already lived in France, Zaire, Senegal, Morocco, Haiti, as well as New York.

"When I met Rafael in 1971, feminism was enjoying a surge of development and I was certainly was encouraged by that, and Rafael definitely considered himself a feminist," she said. "When he met me, he was very supportive and had me in his band right away. He was very happy to be playing with a woman and with someone who had similar ideas about music. We could really be equals in creativity.

The music of the Sea Ensemble - occasionally expanding to a quartet with the addition of the late saxophonist Glenn Spearman and drummer Jay Oliver - is boundlessly lyrical and a template for Kali's later work. Like many small groups of the period, they were resourceful orchestrators, with the ability to create the illusion of a far larger group with their varied instrumentation. Their approach to performance also seemed to transcend Western notions of composition, pacing and even, at points, an easily discernable jazz element -- theirs was a nascent global improvisatory music where melody flowed organically from one piece and grouping of instruments into an entirely different one. Memoirs of a Dream (Flying Note, 2000), a 2-cd set of music which Fasteau carefully shepherded over years of travel (including a concert in Ankara, Turkey in 1977, during which Garrett gently encourages the listeners to "chew their food") is a revelation, a carefully preserved document of Fasteau and Garett's extrasensory interplay and pancultural ritual expression through improvisation, sounded from Holland to Turkey.

The duo played several tours opening for, and playing with, Archie Shepp, as well as a performance with Sun Ra in Amsterdam. Yet, by 1977, the two had parted, and she returned to Paris for three years, beginning a solo career and working as a bandleader. She moved to India in 1981, with a Selmer Mark VI soprano saxophone added to her arsenal, to study Hindustani vocal music with Mangala Mishra.

"I stayed at [Mangala's] father's house, and she would come over at 6 in the morning. They started playing [recorded] music there at 4 in the morning. Everyone gets up early in tropical countries - that's the coolest time of the day. It was beautiful and I learned so much." She then moved on to Chennai (Madras) in South India, where she lived in an “untouchable” fishermen’s village on the coast for six months, traveled all around the region, and earned money making film soundtracks, and performing concerts.



continued...




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