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Cherry, Don

Relativity Suite [VINYL]

Cherry, Don: Relativity Suite [VINYL] (KLIMT)

2020 reissue of trumpeter Don Cherry's '73 album recorded with & commissioned by the Jazz Composer's Orchestra, with Carla Bley on piano, Charlie Haden on bass, and Ed Blackwell on drums, in compositions blending Eastern and Indian music with Western jazz.
 

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product information:


Clear vinyl; edition of 300.

UPC: 889397108212

Label: KLIMT
Catalog ID: MJJ 359CC-LP
Squidco Product Code: 29642

Format: LP
Condition: New
Released: 2020
Country: France
Packaging: Vinyl LP
Recorded on February 14th, 1973 at Blue Rock Studio, New York City by Eddie Korvin.


Personnel:

Don Cherry-composer, conductor, trumpet, conch, voice, percussion

Charles Brackeen-soprano saxophone, alto saxophone, voice

Carlos Ward-alto saxophone, voice

Frank Lowe-tenor saxophone, voice

Dewey Redman-tenor saxophone, voice

Sharon Freeman-french horn

Brian Trentham-trombone

Jack Jeffers-tuba

Leroy Jenkins-violin

Joan Kalisch-viola

Nan Newton-viola

Pat Dixon-cello

Jane Robertson-cello

Charlie Haden-bass

Carla Bley-piano

Ed Blackwell-drums

Paul Motian-percussion

Moki Cherry-tambura

Selene Fung-ching

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Artist Biographies:

"Imagination and a passion for exploration made Don Cherry one of the most influential jazz musicians of the late 20th century. A founding member of Ornette Coleman's groundbreaking quartet of the late '50s, Cherry continued to expand his musical vocabulary until his death in 1995. In addition to performing and recording with his own bands, Cherry worked with such top-ranked jazz musicians as Steve Lacy, Sonny Rollins, Archie Shepp, Albert Ayler, John Coltrane, and Gato Barbieri. Cherry's most prolific period came in the late '70s and early '80s when he joined Nana Vasconcelos and Collin Walcott in the worldbeat group Codona, and with former bandmates Charlie Haden and Ed Blackwell, and saxophonist Dewey Redman in the Coleman-inspired group Old and New Dreams. Cherry later worked with Vasconcelos and saxophonist Carlos Ward in the short-lived group Nu.

The Avant-Garde

Born in Oklahoma City in 1936, he first attained prominence with Coleman, with whom he began playing around 1957. At that time Cherry's instrument of choice was a pocket trumpet (or cornet) -- a miniature version of the full-sized model. The smaller instrument -- in Cherry's hands, at least -- got a smaller, slightly more nasal sound than is typical of the larger horn. Though he would play a regular cornet off and on throughout his career, Cherry remained most closely identified with the pocket instrument. Cherry stayed with Coleman through the early '60s, playing on the first seven (and most influential) of the saxophonist's albums. In 1960, he recorded The Avant-Garde with John Coltrane. After leaving Coleman's band, Cherry played with Steve Lacy, Sonny Rollins, Archie Shepp, and Albert Ayler. In 1963-1964, Cherry co-led the New York Contemporary Five with Shepp and John Tchicai. With Gato Barbieri, Cherry led a band in Europe from 1964-1966, recording two of his most highly regarded albums, Complete Communion and Symphony for Improvisers.

Cherry began the '70s by teaching at Dartmouth College in 1970, and recorded with the Jazz Composer's Orchestra in 1973. He lived in Sweden for four years, and used the country as a base for his travels around Europe and the Middle East. Cherry became increasingly interested in other, mostly non-Western styles of music. In the late '70s and early '80s, he performed and recorded with Codona, a cooperative group with percussionist Nana Vasconcelos and multi-instrumentalist Collin Walcott. Codona's sound was a pastiche of African, Asian, and other indigenous musics.

Art Deco

Concurrently, Cherry joined with ex-Coleman associates Charlie Haden, Ed Blackwell, and Dewey Redman to form Old and New Dreams, a band dedicated to playing the compositions of their former employer. After the dissolution of Codona, Cherry formed Nu with Vasconcelos and saxophonist Carlos Ward. In 1988, he made Art Deco, a more traditional album of acoustic jazz, with Haden, Billy Higgins, and saxophonist James Clay.

Multikulti

Until his death in 1995, Cherry continued to combine disparate musical genres; his interest in world music never abated. Cherry learned to play and compose for wood flutes, tambura, gamelan, and various other non-Western instruments. Elements of these musics inevitably found their way into his later compositions and performances, as on 1990's Multi Kulti, a characteristic celebration of musical diversity. As a live performer, Cherry was notoriously uneven. It was not unheard of for him to arrive very late for gigs, and his technique -- never great to begin with -- showed on occasion a considerable, perhaps inexcusable, decline. In his last years, especially, Cherry seemed less self-possessed as a musician. Yet his musical legacy is one of such influence that his personal failings fade in relative significance."

-All Music (Chris Kelsey) (http://www.allmusic.com/artist/don-cherry-mn0000796166/biography)
10/20/2021

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Leroy Jenkins (March 11, 1932 - February 24, 2007) was a composer and avant-garde jazz violinist and violist.

Jenkins was involved in the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM) while a public school teacher in Chicago. He co-founded the Creative Construction Company with Anthony Braxton and others. He led the Revolutionary Ensemble and formed a trio with Anthony Davis and Andrew Cyrille.

During 1987 he toured Europe as part of Cecil Taylor's group.

He gained recognition for music-theatre works such as The Mother of Three Sons (written in collaboration with Ann T. Greene), Fresh Faust and The Negros Burial Ground (in collaboration with Ann T. Greene), and The Three Willies (in collaboration with Homer Jackson)."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leroy_Jenkins_(jazz_musician))
10/20/2021

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Carla Bley (born Lovella May Borg, May 11, 1936) is an American jazz composer, pianist, organist and bandleader. An important figure in the free jazz movement of the 1960s, she is perhaps best known for her jazz opera Escalator over the Hill (released as a triple LP set), as well as a book of compositions that have been performed by many other artists, including Gary Burton, Jimmy Giuffre, George Russell, Art Farmer, John Scofield and her ex-husband Paul Bley.

Bley was born in Oakland, California to Emil Borg (1899-1990), a piano teacher and church choirmaster, who encouraged her to sing and to learn to play the piano, and Arline Anderson (1907-1944), who died when Bley was eight years old. After giving up the church to immerse herself in roller skating at the age of fourteen, she moved to New York at seventeen and became a cigarette girl at Birdland, where she met jazz pianist Paul Bley. She toured with him under the name Karen Borg, before she changed her name in 1957 to Carla Borg and married Paul Bley the same year adopting the Bley name. He encouraged her to start composing. The couple later divorced but she kept his surname professionally.Later life and career

A number of musicians began to record Bley's compositions: George Russell recorded "Bent Eagle" on his 1960 release Stratusphunk in 1960; Jimmy Giuffre recorded "Ictus" on his album Thesis; and Paul Bley's Barrage consisted entirely of her compositions. Throughout her career Bley has thought of herself as a writer first, once describing herself as 99 percent composer and one percent pianist.

In 1964 she was involved in organising the Jazz Composers Guild which brought together the most innovative musicians in New York at the time. She then had a personal and professional relationship with Michael Mantler, with whom she had a daughter, Karen, now also a musician in her own right. Bley and Mantler were married from 1965-91. With Mantler, she co-led the Jazz Composers' Orchestra and started the JCOA record label which issued a number of historic recordings by Clifford Thornton, Don Cherry and Roswell Rudd, as well as her own magnum opus Escalator Over The Hill and Mantler's The Jazz Composer's Orchestra LPs. Bley and Mantler followed with WATT Records, which has issued their recordings exclusively since the early 1970s. Bley and Mantler were pioneers in the development of independent artist-owned record labels and also started the now defunct New Music Distribution Service which specialized in small, independent labels that issued recordings of "creative improvised music".

Bley has collaborated with a number of other artists, including Jack Bruce, Robert Wyatt and Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason, whose 1981 solo album Nick Mason's Fictitious Sports was entirely written by Bley and performed by her regular band, making it in effect a Carla Bley album in all but name. She arranged and composed music for Charlie Haden's Liberation Music Orchestra, and wrote A Genuine Tong Funeral for Gary Burton. Her arrangement of the score for Federico Fellini's 8½ appeared on Hal Willner's Nino Rota tribute record, Amarcord Nino Rota. She contributed to other Willner projects, including the song "Misterioso" for the tribute to Thelonious Monk entitled That's the Way I Feel Now, which included Johnny Griffin on tenor saxophone, and the Willner-directed tribute to Kurt Weill, entitled Lost in the Stars, where she and her band contributed an arrangement of the title track, with Phil Woods on alto saxophone. In the late 1980s, she also performed with Anton Fier's Golden Palominos and played on their 1985 album, Visions of Excess.

She has continued to record frequently with her own big band, which has included Blood, Sweat and Tears' notable Lew Soloff, and a number of smaller ensembles, notably the Lost Chords. Her current partner, the bassist Steve Swallow, has been her closest and most consistent musical associate in recent years and the two have recorded several duet albums. In 1997, a live version of Escalator over the Hill (re-orchestrated by Jeff Friedman) was performed for the first time in Cologne, Germany; in 1998 Escalator toured Europe, and another live performance took place in May 2006 in Essen, Germany.

In 2005 she arranged the music for and performed on Charlie Haden's latest Liberation Music Orchestra tour and recording, Not in Our Name. She lives in Woodstock, New York."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carla_Bley)
10/20/2021

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Edward Joseph Blackwell (October 10, 1929 - October 7, 1992) was an American jazz drummer born in New Orleans, Louisiana, known for his extensive, influential work with Ornette Coleman.

Blackwell's early career began in New Orleans in the 1950s. He played in a bebop quintet that included pianist Ellis Marsalis and clarinetist Alvin Batiste. There was also a brief stint touring with Ray Charles. The second line parade music of New Orleans greatly influenced Blackwell's drumming style and could be heard in his playing throughout his career.

Blackwell first came to national attention as the drummer with Ornette Coleman's quartet around 1960, when he took over for Billy Higgins in the quartet's stand at the Five Spot in New York City. He is known as one of the great innovators of the free jazz of the 1960s, fusing New Orleans and African rhythms with bebop. In the 1970s and 1980s Blackwell toured and recorded extensively with fellow Ornette Quartet veterans Don Cherry, Charlie Haden, and Dewey Redman in the quartet Old and New Dreams.

In the late 1970s Blackwell became an Artist-in-Residence at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. Blackwell was a beloved figure on the Wesleyan Campus until he died.

In 1981, he performed at the Woodstock Jazz Festival, held in celebration of the tenth anniversary of the Creative Music Studio. "The Ed Blackwell Project" members were Mark Helias, bass, Carlos Ward, alto sax/flute, and Graham Haynes (son of drummer Roy Haynes), cornet.

After years of kidney problems, Blackwell died in 1992. The following year he was inducted into the Down Beat Jazz Hall of Fame."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Blackwell)
10/20/2021

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Stephen Paul Motian (March 25, 1931 - November 22, 2011) was an American jazz drummer, percussionist, and composer. Motian played an important role in freeing jazz drummers from strict time-keeping duties.

He first came to prominence in the late 1950s in the piano trio of Bill Evans, and later was a regular in pianist Keith Jarrett's band for about a decade (c. 1967-1976). Motian began his career as a bandleader in the early 1970s. Perhaps his two most notable groups were a longstanding trio of guitarist Bill Frisell and saxophonist Joe Lovano, and the Electric Bebop Band which featured the drummer working mostly with younger musicians doing interpretations of bebop standards.

Motian was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and raised in Providence, Rhode Island. He is of Armenian descent. After playing guitar in his childhood, Motian began playing the drums at age 12, eventually touring New England in a swing band. During the Korean War he joined the Navy.

Motian became a professional musician in 1954, and briefly played with pianist Thelonious Monk. He became well known as the drummer in pianist Bill Evans's trio (1959-64), initially alongside bassist Scott LaFaro and later with Chuck Israels.

Subsequently, he played with pianists Paul Bley (1963-64) and Keith Jarrett (1967-76). Other musicians with whom Motian performed and/or recorded in the early period of his career included Lennie Tristano, Warne Marsh, Lee Konitz, Joe Castro, Arlo Guthrie (Motian performed briefly with Guthrie in 1968-69, and performed with the singer at Woodstock), Carla Bley, Charlie Haden, and Don Cherry. Motian subsequently worked with musicians such as Marilyn Crispell, Bill Frisell, Leni Stern, Joe Lovano, Alan Pasqua, Bill McHenry, Stéphan Oliva, Frank Kimbrough, Eric Watson and many more.

Later in his career, Motian became an important composer and group leader, recording initially for ECM Records in the 1970s and early 1980s and then for Soul Note, JMT, and Winter & Winter before returning to ECM in 2005. From the early 1980s he led a trio featuring guitarist Bill Frisell and saxophonist Joe Lovano, occasionally joined by bassists Ed Schuller, Charlie Haden, or Marc Johnson, and other musicians, including Jim Pepper, Lee Konitz, Dewey Redman and Geri Allen. In addition to playing Motian's compositions, the group recorded tributes to Thelonious Monk and Bill Evans, and a series of Paul Motian on Broadway albums, featuring original interpretations of jazz standards.

Despite his important associations with pianists, Motian's work as a leader since the 1970s rarely included a pianist in his ensembles and relied heavily on guitarists. Motian's first instrument was the guitar, and he apparently retained an affinity for the instrument: in addition to his groups with Frisell, his first two solo albums on ECM featured Sam Brown, and his Electric Bebop Band featured two and occasionally three electric guitars. The group was founded in the early 1990s, and featured a variety of young guitar and saxophone players, in addition to electric bass and Motian's drums, including saxophonists Joshua Redman, Chris Potter, Chris Cheek, and Tony Malaby, and guitarists Kurt Rosenwinkel, Brad Shepik, Wolfgang Muthspiel, Steve Cardenas, Ben Monder, and Jakob Bro.

In 2011 Motian featured on a number of new recordings, including Live at Birdland (with Lee Konitz, Brad Mehldau and Charlie Haden), Samuel Blaser's Consort in Motion, No Comment by Augusto Pirodda, and Further Explorations with Chick Corea and Eddie Gómez. Bill McHenry's Ghosts of the Sun was released - by coincidence - on the day of Motian's death. Motian's final album as bandleader was The Windmills of Your Mind, featuring Bill Frisell, Thomas Morgan and Petra Haden.

Motian died on November 22, 2011 at New York's Mount Sinai Hospital of complications from myelodysplastic syndrome."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Motian)
10/20/2021

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Moki Cherry was a Swedish interdisciplinary artist and designer who worked in tapestry, fashion design, painting, music, collage, woodwork and ceramics. She worked with materials that have a relationship to functionality and themes relating to nature and spirituality. Moki envisioned her life and work as part of an aesthetic utopian vision of 'home as stage, stage as home', in which her artworks were experienced in the home, in music and theatre performances, and in art galleries.

Moki Cherry was born in Norbotten, Sweden in 1943. While growing up her family moved around the country to wherever her father ran the station house and her mother the post office. Since early childhood Moki was absorbed by the world of animals and nature, choosing to spend most of her time in the forest instead of with other children. Moki moved to Stockholm in 1962 to study fashion and textiles at Beckman's School of Design. Her practice later developed into painting, tapestry, music, set design, theatre, sculpture, ceramics, and collage.

Moki first met the jazz musician Don Cherry in 1963 in Stockholm, while he was on tour with Sonny Rollins. In the following years Don returned to Stockholm on various tours and eventually he and Moki decided to build a life together. After graduating from Beckman's in 1966 Moki travelled to New York to work in fashion design, but instead the collaborations between her and Don began to take centre stage in her life. While Don was recording the record Where is Brooklyn? (Blue Note, 1969) Moki created the album artwork, which was the first of many album covers that she made for his music. During this time in New York Moki began making paintings, tapestries, and costumes, of which many were used to create colourful environments for Don's performances and albums.

In 1967 Moki and Don started Movement Incorporated, an art and music project that they renamed Organic Music, or at times Organic Music Theatre. Their first concert took place at ABF Huset in Stockholm. A group of musicians and dancers were invited to take part, and Moki created costumes, posters, stage sets, and a live painting during the performance. A few days later they organised a similar happening at Kunsthal Charlottenborg in Copenhagen. This is how the Organic Music tours and workshops began.

In 1968 Moki, Don and their two children, Neneh and Eagle-eye, left Stockholm for good. The family moved around Europe and the USA for the next two years with no fixed home. They lived in Vermont, close to Dartmouth College, where Don was invited as a music professor and artist-in-residence for two semesters in 1970. While in Vermont, Moki and Don organised an "opera" with over 100 students at Dartmouth. Moki designed the costumes and sets, and their home acted as a rehearsal space on weekends. Later that year the Cherrys bought an old schoolhouse in the south of Sweden that became the family home. Inspired by their time in Dartmouth, the schoolhouse became a creative and educational hub for musicians, artists, friends and their children. The schoolhouse was a base for the family while they continued to tour with Organic Music performances and workshops in Europe, USA and Japan.

In 1971 the Cherrys were invited by the curator Pontus Hultén to take part in Utopier och Visioner 1871-1981 (Utopias and Visions 1871-1981) at Moderna Museet in Stockholm. For three months the family lived at the museum and ran daily workshops and happenings in a geodesic dome built by artist Bengt Carling. Inside the dome Moki created costumes, tapestries, sculptures and paintings on a daily basis, including a large Mandala that she gradually painted on the floor. Throughout the 1970s Moki's artistic vision continued to develop and transform alongside touring and raising two children. Her practice traversed the worlds of art, music and theater with diverse influences such as Indian art and music, Tibetan buddhism, fashion, traditional folk arts and dress, abstraction, cartoons and Pop art.

Moki had her first solo exhibition in 1973 at Galleri 1 in Stockholm, which featured tapestries, paintings and live music performances. In 1975 they set up Tågarp Skola Kulturförening (Tågarp Culture Collective), to arrange public art, theatre and music events at the schoolhouse. During the summers of 1978-85 Moki and her friend Anita Roney ran a youth theatre group in Tågarp called Octopuss Teater, with annual end of term performances at Moderna Museet in Stockholm.

From the mid-70s onwards the Cherry family lived between Sweden and New York City . They rented a loft in Long Island City in Queens, which Moki built into a living space and studio. Moki began to focus more on her personal artwork and in 1979 she had a solo exhibition of tapestries at Lyn Kienholz's gallery, LAX814, in Los Angeles.

During the 1980s Moki and Don collaborated less, but from time to time she designed album artwork and clothing for Don and his bands CoDoNa and Old and New Dreams. They separated at the end of the 1980s, Don moved to San Francisco while Moki continued to live between Sweden and New York. Moki frequently exhibited in both places, and her work progressed into sculpture using wood and electric light, ceramics, and collage. She returned to painting and tapestry in the last few years of her life. Moki Cherry died at home in Tågarp on August 29th, 2009."

-Moki Cherry Website (https://mokicherry.com/about)
10/20/2021

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.
track listing:


SIDE 1

Tantra 8:00

Mali Doussn'Gouni 5:40

Desireless 1:22

SIDE 2

The Queen of Tung-Ting Lake 4:30

Trans-Love Airways 6:50

Infinite Gentleness 3:22

March of the Hobbits 3:38
sample the album:








descriptions, reviews, &c.

"Finally available again on vinyl! Don Cherry's Relativity Suite, recorded with the Jazz Composer's Orchestra in 1973. At this time, Cherry was becoming increasingly interested in Middle Eastern and traditional African and Indian music, having traveled extensively and studied with Indian musician Vasant Rai. This suite of songs was particularly influenced by the Indian karnatic singing tradition, as can be heard from the very opening moments of the album. Featuring Carla Bley on piano, Charlie Haden on bass, and Ed Blackwell on drums, as well as an extended horn and string section, Cherry collaborated extensively with the Jazz Composers Orchestra throughout the early seventies. His Swedish wife, Moki Cherry, plays tambura on 'Trans-Love Airways.'"-KLIMT


Clear vinyl; edition of 300.
Related Categories of Interest:


Improvised Music
Jazz
Free Improvisation
NY Downtown & Metropolitan Jazz/Improv
Large Ensembles
Jazz Reissues
New in Improvised Music
Recent Releases and Best Sellers
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