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Company (Bailey / Honsinger / Kondon / Toop/ Cooper / Lacy / &c): 1981 [VINYL 2 LPs] (Honest Jons Records)

Derek Bailey's Company exploring free improvisation through a shifting and impressive lineup of performers, here in previously unreleased recordings with musicians including Derek Bailey, Tristan Honsinger, Christine Jeffrey, Toshinori Kondo, Charlie Morrow, David Toop, Maarten Altena, Georgie Born, Lindsay Cooper, Steve Lacy, Radu Malfatti and Jamie Muir.
 

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product information:


UPC: 769791975194

Label: Honest Jons Records
Catalog ID: HJR 210LP
Squidco Product Code: 28298

Format: 2 LPS
Condition: New
Released: 2019
Country: UK
Packaging: LP - Gatefold
Recorded at the BBC in London, England, in 1981.


Personnel:

Maarten Altena-bass

Lindsay Cooper-bassoon

Georgie Born-cello

Tristan Honsinger-cello

David Toop-flute, bells, instruments

Derek Bailey-guitar

Jamie Muir-percussion

Steve Lacy-soprano saxophone

Radu Malfatti-trombone

Toshinori Kondo-trumpet

Charlie Morrow-trumpet, voice, horn

Christine Jeffrey-voice

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Artist Biographies:

"Lindsay Cooper (3 March 1951 18 September 2013) was an English bassoon and oboe player, composer and political activist. Best known for her work with the band Henry Cow, she was also a member of Comus, National Health, News from Babel and David Thomas and the Pedestrians. She collaborated with a number of musicians, including Chris Cutler and Sally Potter, and co-founded the Feminist Improvising Group. She wrote scores for film and TV and a song cycle Oh Moscow which was performed live around the world in 1987. She also recorded a number of solo albums, including Rags (1980), The Gold Diggers (1983) and Music For Other Occasions (1986).

Cooper was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in the late 1970s, but did not disclose it to the musical community until the late 1990s when her illness prevented her from performing live. In September 2013, Cooper died from the illness at the age of 62, 15 years after her retirement."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindsay_Cooper)
12/10/2019

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Georgina Emma Mary Born, OBE, FBA (born 15 November 1955) is a British academic, anthropologist and musician. As a musician she is known as Georgie Born and is known for her work in Henry Cow and with Lindsay Cooper.

Born was born on 15 November 1955 in Wheatley, Oxfordshire, England. She is the granddaughter of the physicist and Nobel laureate Max Born, daughter of the pharmacologist Gustav Born and Ann Plowden-Wardlaw, stepdaughter of the American theatre director and writer George Mully, and cousin of the pop singer Olivia Newton-John. She is the partner of social theorist and political geographer Andrew Barry.

Born studied the cello and piano at the Royal College of Music in London, and performed classical and modern music including stints with the Michael Nyman Band, the Penguin Cafe Orchestra and the Flying Lizards. She also studied for a year at the Chelsea School of Art.

In June 1976, she joined the English avant-rock group Henry Cow as bass guitarist and cellist, following the departure of John Greaves. Henry Cow was in a period of intensive touring and Born toured Europe with the group for two years.

After Henry Cow, Born performed and recorded with a number of groups and musicians, including fellow Henry Cow member Lindsay Cooper, National Health, Bruford, and Mike Westbrook, particularly as a cellist in the Westbrook Orchestra. Her playing is prominent on Westbrook's album, The Cortege. Late in 1977, Born, Cooper, Sally Potter and Maggie Nichols founded the Feminist Improvising Group. She also recorded with The Raincoats, and played improvised music with Lol Coxhill, Steve Beresford, David Toop and others as a member of the London Musicians' Collective.

During the 1980s, Born was an occasional member of Derek Bailey's Company, and played cello and bass guitar on numerous soundtracks for television and film for composers Lindsay Cooper and Mike Westbrook, as well as the soundtrack for the Stephen Poliakoff play Caught on a Train (1980). She had a walk-on part in Sally Potter's film The Gold Diggers (1983).

Born studied anthropology at University College London, gaining her BSc in 1982 and her PhD (supervised by Michael Gilsenan and Michael Rowlands) in 1989. Her first academic job (1986-89) was in the Department of Human Sciences at Brunel University, where she assisted Roger Silverstone in setting up the degree in Communication and Information Studies. Born moved to a lectureship in the Department of Media and Communications at Goldsmiths' College, London (1989-97), where she worked alongside Dick Hebdige.

In 1997 Born began work for an Assistant Lectureship in the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Cambridge. In 2000 she was appointed to a Lectureship, in 2003 to Reader in Sociology, Anthropology and Music, and in 2006 to Professor of Sociology, Anthropology and Music at Cambridge, a title that recognises her interdisciplinary contributions.

At Cambridge, Born teaches the sociology and anthropology of culture, media, music, and ethnographic method in the Department of Sociology. She is responsible for the only dedicated lecture course on contemporary media in the social sciences.

Born is a member of Cambridge's Screen Media Group, which in 2006 launched Cambridge's first cross-Schools master's degree, Screen Media and Cultures. Born founded and directs the Cambridge Media Research Group which runs a seminar series and related events. In 2005 she organised a conference at Cambridge on the legacy of Laura Mulvey's essay, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema".

Between 1996 and 1998, Born was a visiting professor in the Institute of Musicology at the University of Aarhus, and from 1997 to 1998 Senior Research Fellow at King's College, Cambridge. From 1998 to 2006 she was Fellow and Director of Studies in Social and Political Sciences at Emmanuel College, Cambridge. Born is Honorary Professor of Anthropology at University College London and a Fellow of the Center for Cultural Sociology at Yale University. She is also a Fellow of the Australian Cultural Sociology Association and of the Australian Centre for Independent Journalism.

n 2010 Born was awarded an Advanced Grant by the European Research Council for a major programme of research on the transformation of music by digital media. Subsequently, she moved to become Professor of Music and Anthropology at the University of Oxford. Since 2012, she has also been a Fellow of Mansfield College, Oxford. In 2014 she was elected a Fellow of the British Academy."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgina_Born)
12/10/2019

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Tristan Honsinger told Kevin Whitehead, 'I grew up in New England, took up cello at age nine in Springfield, Massachusetts... My first teacher was a Dutch Jew. Almost all my teachers were European immigrants. Later I went to the New England Conservatory. It was quite a good school, but I didn't feel very welcome, so I went to Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore from '68 to '69. By then I'd had it, really, with the whole classical music world. I changed teachers so many times, I suppose I was confused by their contradictory advice'.

It was after moving to Montreal in 1969 that Honsiner began improvising and, after meeting Dutch percussionist Peter van Ginkel and listening to his copy of Topography of the lungs, decided he could play this music and uprooted to Europe, moving to Amsterdam in 1974: 'They arrested me the first time I played my cello in the street... confiscated our instruments'. As a result, he moved to Paris, travelled around France, eventually finding his way back to Amsterdam where he began playing with Maarten van Regteren Altena, Han Bennink and Misha Mengelberg as well as being involved in Derek Bailey's Company Weeks and playing with Globe Unity.

The late '70s and early '80s were spent in Italy with Katie Duck, working with theatre - Duck had her group the Great Salt Lake Mime Troupe - and Italian and Sardinian musicians. During this time, Honsinger started his group This, That and the Other, the early version including Tiziana Simona, Sean Bergin, Toshinori Kondo, Jean-Jacques Avenel and Michael Vatcher which recorded Picnic in Amsterdam in 1985. 'Because of a promoter's brilliant organising, the group kind of fell apart', but there have been fairly regular and recent incarnations, including an appearance at the Italian Angelica Festival in 1996.

Since the memorable set of concerts in Berlin in 1988, released on the much sought-after FMP box set, Honsinger has been a fairly regular member of Cecil Taylor's groups. At those concerts, Honsinger performed in a trio with Taylor and Evan Parker as well as being a member of the large European Orchestra but since then he has been a member of various Taylor groups, including the now-disbanded European Quartet with Harri Sjöström and Paul Lovens, including an unusual combination that performed at the Total Music Meeting in November 1999: the Cecil Taylor Ensemble with Franky Douglas, Tristan Honsinger and Andrew Cyrille."

-European Free Improv Site (http://www.efi.group.shef.ac.uk/musician/mhonsing.html)
12/10/2019

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"David Toop (born 5 May 1949) is an English musician, author, and professor and chair of audio culture and improvisation at the London College of Communication. He was a member of the Flying Lizards and a contributor to the British magazine The Face. He is a regular contributor to The Wire, a British music magazine.

Soon after his birth, his parents moved to Waltham Cross, Hertfordshire, where he grew up. He was educated at Broxbourne Grammar School, which he left in 1967 to study at Hornsey College of Art.

Toop published his pioneering book on hip hop, Rap Attack, in 1984. Eleven years later, Ocean of Sound appeared, described as Toop's "poetic survey of contemporary musical life from Debussy through Ambient, Techno, and drum 'n' bass." Since the 1970s, Toop has also been a significant presence on the British experimental and improvised music scene, collaborating with Max Eastley, Brian Eno, Scanner, and others. He is a member of the improvising, genre-hopping quartet Alterations, active from 1977 to 1986 and reforming in 2015. In 2001, Toop curated the sound art exhibition Sonic Boom, and the following year, he curated a 2-CD collection entitled Not Necessarily Enough English Music: A Collection of Experimental Music from Great Britain, 19601977. More experimentally, Toop has also actively engaged with 'sounding objects' from a range of museums."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Toop)
12/10/2019

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Derek Bailey (29 January 1930 - 25 December 2005) was an English avant-garde guitarist and leading figure in the free improvisation movement.

Bailey was born in Sheffield, England. A third-generation musician, he began playing the guitar at the age of ten, initially studying music with his teacher and Sheffield City organist C. H. C. Biltcliffe, an experience that he did not enjoy, and guitar with his uncle George Wing and John Duarte. As an adult he worked as a guitarist and session musician in clubs, radio, dance hall bands, and so on, playing with many performers including Morecambe and Wise, Gracie Fields, Bob Monkhouse and Kathy Kirby, and on television programs such as Opportunity Knocks. Bailey's earliest foray into 'what could be called free improvised music' was in 1953 with two other guitarists in their shared flat in Glasgow. He was also part of a Sheffield-based trio founded in 1963 with Tony Oxley and Gavin Bryars called "Joseph Holbrooke" (named after the composer, whose work they never actually played). Although originally performing relatively "conventional" modal, harmonic jazz this group became increasingly free in direction.

Bailey moved to London in 1966, frequenting the Little Theatre Club run by drummer John Stevens. Here he met many other like-minded musicians, such as saxophonist Evan Parker, trumpet player Kenny Wheeler and double bass player Dave Holland. These players often collaborated under the umbrella name of the Spontaneous Music Ensemble, recording the seminal album Karyobin for Island Records in 1968. In this year Bailey also formed the Music Improvisation Company with Parker, percussionist Jamie Muir and Hugh Davies on homemade electronics, a project that continued until 1971. He was also a member of the Jazz Composer's Orchestra and Iskra 1903, a trio with double-bass player Barry Guy and tromboneist Paul Rutherford that was named after a newspaper published by the Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin.

In 1970, Bailey founded the record label Incus with Tony Oxley, Evan Parker and Michael Walters. It proved influential as the first musician-owned independent label in the UK. Oxley and Walters left early on; Parker and Bailey continued as co-directors until the mid-1980s, when friction between the men led to Parker's departure. Bailey continued the label with his partner Karen Brookman until his death in 2005[citation needed].

Along with a number of other musicians, Bailey was a co-founder of Musics magazine in 1975. This was described as "an impromental experivisation arts magazine" and circulated through a network of like-minded record shops, arguably becoming one of the most significant jazz publications of the second half of the 1970s, and instrumental in the foundation of the London Musicians Collective.

1976 saw Bailey instigate Company, an ever-changing collection of like-minded improvisors, which at various times has included Anthony Braxton, Tristan Honsinger, Misha Mengelberg, Lol Coxhill, Fred Frith, Steve Beresford, Steve Lacy, Johnny Dyani, Leo Smith, Han Bennink, Eugene Chadbourne, Henry Kaiser, John Zorn, Buckethead and many others. Company Week, an annual week-long free improvisational festival organised by Bailey, ran until 1994.

In 1980, he wrote the book Improvisation: Its Nature and Practice. This was adapted by UK's Channel 4 into a four-part TV series in the early '90s, edited and narrated by Bailey.

Bailey died in London on Christmas Day, 2005. He had been suffering from motor neurone disease."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derek_Bailey_(guitarist))
12/10/2019

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Jamie Muir (born in Edinburgh, Scotland) is a Scottish painter and former percussionist, best known for his work in King Crimson.

Muir attended the Edinburgh College of Art during the 1960s, and began playing jazz on trombone before settling on percussion.

After moving to London, Muir worked with choreographer Lindsay Kemp, and was active in free improvisation, recording, and performing with Derek Bailey and Evan Parker in The Music Improvisation Company from 1968-1971. Muir used various found objects as part of his percussion repertoire. He spoke of "approach[ing] the rubbish with a total respect for its nature as rubbish", and that "The way to discover the undiscovered in performing terms is to immediately reject all situations as you identify them (the cloud of unknowing) - which is to give music a future". During this period he also played in the band Boris with Don Weller and Jimmy Roche (both later of jazz-rock band Major Surgery) and put in a stint with Afro-rock band Assagai in which he met keyboard player Alan Gowen. Muir and Gowen subsequently formed the experimental jazz-rock band Sunship with guitarist Allan Holdsworth and bass player Laurie Baker, although Muir has admitted that "we spent more time laughing than playing music" and suggests that the band played no gigs and got no further than rehearsals.

Muir was a member of King Crimson from mid-1972 to early 1973. With King Crimson, Muir occasionally played a standard drum kit, but more often he contributed an assortment of unusual sounds from a wide variety of percussion instruments, including chimes, bells, thumb piano, mbiras, a musical saw, shakers, rattles, found objects, and miscellaneous drums. Muir initially appeared on a single King Crimson album, 1973's Larks' Tongues In Aspic. Several live recordings featuring Muir have been released later by DGM records; the 15-CD box set released in 2012 for the 40th anniversary of the album includes every recording from that line-up, be it live or studio, documenting everything Muir has ever contributed. King Crimson violinist/keyboardist David Cross reports that "We all learned an incredible amount from Jamie. He really was a catalyst of this band in the beginning and he opened up new areas for Bill [Bill Bruford, the group's "conventional" drummer] to look into as well as affecting the rest of us."

In 1972 Muir decided to pursue a monastic lifestyle, in accordance with the strict principles of Buddhism. He left King Crimson abruptly in early 1973 and moved to Samye Ling Monastery near Eskdalemuir in southern Scotland. He had just completed his contribution to Larks' Tongues, released subsequent to his departure. The British Press at the time attributed his decision as the result of "personal injury sustained onstage during performance", a phrase attributed to the band's management company, E'G.

Jamie Muir also showed Yes's Jon Anderson about Paramahansa Yogananda's works during the wedding reception of the previous Yes drummer Bill Bruford, which ultimately led up to influencing the album Tales From Topographic Oceans by Yes, based on the Yogananda's Autobiography of a Yogi.

In 1980, Muir returned to the London music scene, recording with Evan Parker and Derek Bailey. He was also on the soundtrack of the film Ghost Dance, a collaboration with another Crimson alumnus, drummer Michael Giles and David Cunningham recorded in 1983, and eventually released in 1996.

Muir has since withdrawn completely from the music business and now devotes his energies to painting."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamie_Muir)
12/10/2019

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Steve Lacy (July 23, 1934 - June 4, 2004), born Steven Norman Lackritz in New York City, was a jazz saxophonist and composer recognized as one of the important players of soprano saxophone. Coming to prominence in the 1950s as a progressive dixieland musician, Lacy went on to a long and prolific career. He worked extensively in experimental jazz and to a lesser extent in free improvisation, but Lacy's music was typically melodic and tightly-structured. Lacy also became a highly distinctive composer, with compositions often built out of little more than a single questioning phrase, repeated several times.

The music of Thelonious Monk became a permanent part of Lacy's repertoire after a stint in the pianist's band, with Monk's songs appearing on virtually every Lacy album and concert program; Lacy often partnered with trombonist Roswell Rudd in exploring Monk's work. Beyond Monk, Lacy performed the work of jazz composers such as Charles Mingus, Duke Ellington and Herbie Nichols; unlike many jazz musicians he rarely played standard popular or show tunes.

Lacy began his career at sixteen playing Dixieland music with much older musicians such as Henry "Red" Allen, Pee Wee Russell, George "Pops" Foster and Zutty Singleton and then with Kansas City jazz players like Buck Clayton, Dicky Wells, and Jimmy Rushing. He then became involved with the avant-garde, performing on Jazz Advance (1956), the debut album of Cecil Taylor,:55 and appearing with Taylor's groundbreaking quartet at the 1957 Newport Jazz Festival; he also made a notable appearance on an early Gil Evans album. His most enduring relationship, however, was with the music of Thelonious Monk: he recorded the first album to feature only Monk compositions (Reflections, Prestige, 1958) and briefly played in Monk's band in 1960:241 and later on Monk's Big Band and Quartet in Concert album (Columbia, 1963).

Lacy's first visit to Europe came in 1965, with a visit to Copenhagen in the company of Kenny Drew; he went to Italy and formed a quartet with Italian trumpeter Enrico Rava and the South African musicians Johnny Dyani and Louis Moholo (their visit to Buenos Aires is documented on The Forest and the Zoo, ESP, 1967). After a brief return to New York, he returned to Italy, then in 1970 moved to Paris, where he lived until the last two years of his life. He became a widely respected figure on the European jazz scene, though he remained less well known in the U.S.

The core of Lacy's activities from the 1970s to the 1990s was his sextet: his wife, singer/violinist Irene Aebi,:272 soprano/alto saxophonist Steve Potts, pianist Bobby Few, bassist Jean-Jacques Avenel, and drummer Oliver Johnson (later John Betsch). Sometimes this group was scaled up to a large ensemble (e.g. Vespers, Soul Note, 1993, which added Ricky Ford on tenor sax and Tom Varner on French horn), sometimes pared down to a quartet, trio, or even a two-saxophone duo. He played duos with pianist Eric Watson. Lacy also, beginning in the 1970s, became a specialist in solo saxophone; he ranks with Sonny Rollins, Anthony Braxton, Evan Parker, and Lol Coxhill in the development of this demanding form of improvisation.

Lacy was interested in all the arts: the visual arts and poetry in particular became important sources for him. Collaborating with painters and dancers in multimedia projects, he made musical settings of his favourite writers: Robert Creeley, Samuel Beckett, Tom Raworth, Taslima Nasrin, Herman Melville, Brion Gysin and other Beat writers, including settings for the Tao Te Ching and haiku poetry. As Creeley noted in the Poetry Project Newsletter, "There's no way simply to make clear how particular Steve Lacy was to poets or how much he can now teach them by fact of his own practice and example. No one was ever more generous or perceptive."

In 1992, he was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship (nicknamed the "genius grant").

He also collaborated with a wide range of musicians, from traditional jazz to the avant-garde to contemporary classical music. Outside of his regular sextet, his most regular collaborator was pianist Mal Waldron,:244-245 with whom he recorded a number of duet albums (notably Sempre Amore, a collection of Ellington/Strayhorn material, Soul Note, 1987).

Lacy played his 'farewell concerts to Europe' in Belgium, in duo and solo, for a small but motivated public. This happened in Brussels, Antwerp, Ghent, Bruge and Bergen. This recollection is published by Naked Music. In Ghent he played with the classical violinist Mikhail Bezverkhni, winner of Queen Elisabeth Concours. He returned to the United States in 2002, where he began teaching at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Massachusetts. One of his last public performances was in front of 25,000 people at the close of a peace rally on Boston Common in March 2003, shortly before the US-led invasion of Iraq.

After Lacy was diagnosed with cancer in August 2003, he continued playing and teaching until weeks before his death on June 4, 2004 at the age of 69."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Lacy)
12/10/2019

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Radu Malfatti is an Austrian trombone player and composer. He was born in Innsbruck, in the province of Tyrol, on December 16, 1943. He has been described as "among the leaders in redefining the avant-garde as truly on-the-edge art." His work "since the early nineties... has been investigating the edges of ultraminimalism in both his composed and improvised work." He also operates B-Boim, a CD-R only record label focusing on improvised and composed music, much of it his own."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radu_Malfatti)
12/10/2019

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Toshinori Kondo (December 15, 1948 in Ehime Prefecture) is an avant-garde jazz and jazz fusion trumpeter. Kondo attended Kyoto university in 1967, and became close friends with percussionist Tsuchitori Toshiyuki. In 1972 the pair left university, and Toshiyuki went on to work with Peter Brook, while Kondo joined Yosuke Yamashita. In 1978 he moved to New York, and began performing with Bill Laswell, John Zorn, Fred Frith, and Eraldo Bernocchi. A year later he released his first recording, toured Europe with Eugene Chadbourne, and collaborated with European musicians such as Peter Brotzman. Returning to Japan, he worked with Ryuichi Sakamoto, Kazumi Watanabe, and Herbie Hancock. In the mid-1980s he began focusing on his own career, blending his avant-garde origins with electronic music. In 2002, he worked on an international peace festival in Hiroshima after being approached by the Dalai Lama about organizing one. He is a former member of Praxis. Kondo cooperated with Bill Laswell to make the album Inamorata in 2007.

He founded the band Kondo IMA in 1984. Kondo IMA achieved commercial success but moved to Amsterdam to be alone and to start "Blow the Earth" in 1993. They started "Blow the Earth in Japan" in the summer of 2007 and ended in the autumn of 2011. The film Blow the Earth in Japan is his first experience as a film director."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toshinori_Kondo)
12/10/2019

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.
track listing:


SIDE A



1 Come On And Hear 10:33

2 Pass

SIDE B



1 Trio 13:13

2 Quartet

SIDE C



1 Trackle 14:03

2 Cackle

SIDE D



1 Heptarchy 12:07
sample the album:








descriptions, reviews, &c.

"Previously unreleased recordings by various lineups drawn from Derek Bailey, Tristan Honsinger, Christine Jeffrey, Toshinori Kondo, Charlie Morrow, David Toop, Maarten Altena, Georgie Born, Lindsay Cooper, Steve Lacy, Radu Malfatti and Jamie Muir.

Journalists often make the brief history of Free Improvisation conform to the idea that the history of music is a nice straight line from past to present: Beethoven... Brahms... Boulez. Thus Derek Bailey, Evan Parker and John Stevens - together with Brötzmann and co across the Channel - were the trailblazing 'first generation', forging a wholly new language alongside contemporary avant-garde and free jazz. Figures like Toshinori Kondo and David Toop, willing as they were to incorporate snippets of all kinds of music, were the pesky 'second generation', happily cocking a snook at the 'ideological purity' of Bailey's non-idiomatic improvisation.

Company 1981 shows up the foolishness - the wrongness - of such storylines. Check the eclectic collection of guests Bailey invited to Company Weeks over the years. He had clear ideas about the music, but he was no ideological purist.

One of the founders of Fluxus, Charlie Morrow injects blasts of Cageian fun into half the recordings here, whether blurting military fanfares from his trumpet, or intoning far-flung scraps of speech. Cellist Tristan Honsinger and vocalist Christine Jeffrey join in the joyful glossolalia, while Bailey, Toop and Kondo contribute delicious, delicate, hooligan arabesques, by turns.

The remainder are performed by a different ensemble: Bailey, bassist Maarten Altena, former Henry Cow members Georgie Born and Lindsay Cooper on cello and bassoon, the insanely inventive Jamie Muir on percussion, and trombonist Radu Malfatti, showing his mastery of extended technique. Were that not enough, there's the inimitable purity of Steve Lacy's soprano ringing high and clear above the melee. Glorious!

There's always been this idea that Free Improvisation is somehow Difficult Listening, but when the doors of perception are thrown open and prejudice cast aside, you realise that it's not difficult at all. "Is it that easy?" chirps Morrow, at one point. Indeed it is.Enjoy yourself."-Honest Jon's

Related Categories of Interest:


Vinyl Recordings
Improvised Music
Free Improvisation
London & UK Improv & Related Scenes
European Improvisation and Experimental Forms
Large Ensembles
Bailey, Derek
New in Improvised Music


Other Releases With These Artists:
Le Quatuor De Jazz Libre Du Quebec
Musique-Politique Anthologie 1971/1974 [4 CDS]
(Tour de Bras)
Henry Cow
The Henry Cow Box Redux: The Complete Henry Cow [17 CDs, 1 DVD, 250pg Book]
(Recommended Records)
Company (Bailey / Frith / Lewis / Parker / Oppens / Le Baron / Suzuki / Tippetts / Toshizawa / Tippett / Wachsmann)
Epiphany [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Honest Jons Records)
Music Improvisation Company, The (Bailey / Parker / Davies / Muir)
1969, 1970 [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Honest Jons Records)
Westbrook / Rossini
Westbrook-Rossini
(Hatology)
Westbrook, Mike Orchestra
On Duke's Birthday
(Hatology)
Moholo, Louis Octet
Spirits Rejoice! [VINYL]
(Otoroku)
Hook, Line & Sinker (Tristan Honsinger / Antonio Borghini / Axel Dorner / Tobias Delius)
Fishy Business
(Relative Pitch)
ICP Tentet
Tetterettet
(Corbett vs. Dempsey)
Bailey, Derek / Han Bennink / Evan Parker
Topographie Parisienne [4 CDs]
(Fou Records)
Cherry, Don / Dave Holland / Steve Lacy / Masahiko Togashi
Live at Yubin Chokin Kaikan Hall, Tokyo on May 14, 1986 [VINYL]
(Victory)
Chadbourne, Eugene / Cat Jammers
Invitation To A Jam Session [CASSETTE]
(Chadula)
Chadbourne, Eugene / Cat Jammers
Invitation To A Jam Session
(Chadula)
Bailey, Derek / Tony Coe
Time [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Honest Jons Records)
Bailey, Derek & Cyro Baptista
Cyro [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Honest Jons Records)
Brighton, Ian
Marsh Gas [REISSUE]
(FMR)
In the Sea (Tristan Honsinger / Nicolas Caloia / Joshua Zubot)
Forks and Spoons
(Creative Sources)
Bailey, Derek / Tristan Honsinger
Duo [VINYL-DAMAGED]
(Honest Jons Records)
Bailey, Derek
Lot 74 [VINYL-DAMAGED]
(Honest Jons Records)
Rota, Nino
Amarcord
(Corbett vs. Dempsey)
Coleman, Ornette
Looking For Ornette [DVD]
(La Huite)
Rodrigues, Ernesto / Tristan Honsinger / Guilherme Rodrigues / Klaus Kurvers
Ignis Fatuus
(Creative Sources)
Bailey, Derek
Aida [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Honest Jons Records)
Bailey, Derek / Evan Parker
The London Concert [VINYL]
(Otoroku)
Lacy, Steve
Stamps [2 CDs]
(Corbett vs. Dempsey)
Kaiser, Henry
Friends & Heroes: Guitar Duets
(Fractal Music)
Bailey, Derek / Tristan Honsinger
Duo [VINYL]
(Honest Jons Records)
Seen, The
Archive : Volumes Vi - X : 2014 To 2016
(Confront)
Dorner, Axel / Mia Dyberg / Pierre Borel / Ernesto Rodrigues / Tristan Honsinger / Guilherme Rodrigues
Laura
(Creative Sources)
Honsinger, Tristan / Nicolas Calioa / Joshua Zubot
In The Sea
(Relative Pitch)
Henry Cow
Vol. 9: Late
(Recommended Records)
Henry Cow
Vol. 8: Bremen
(Recommended Records)
Henry Cow
Vol. 7: Later and Post-Virgin
(Recommended Records)
Picnic (Honsinger / Kondo / Bergen / Jacques Avenel / Vatcher / Vigni)
Picnic
(Corbett vs. Dempsey)
Chadbourne, Eugene
Boogie With The Hook
(Leo Records)
Williams, Arthur (w/ Peter Kuhn / Toshinori Kondo / William Parker / Denis Charles)
Forgiveness Suite [VINYL]
(NoBusiness)
Kuhn, Peter (w/ Toshinori Kondo / Arthur Williams / William Parker / Denis Charles)
No Coming, No Going. The Music of Peter Kuhn, 1978-1979 [2 CDs]
(NoBusiness)
Malfatti / Drumm / Capece
The Volume Surrounding The Task
(Potlatch)
10tet (Akiyama / Kamura / Malfatti / Kinoshita / Okura / Veliotis / Unami / Koike / Filip / Sugimoto)
10tet
(Confront)
Hankil, Ryu / Noid / Matija Schellander and others
Foreign Correspondents [2 CDs]
(Mikroton Recordings)
Chadbourne, Eugene
Eddie Chatterbox: The Sound Of Genius
(Chadula)
Lacy, Steve / Steve Potts
Tips
(Corbett vs. Dempsey)
Perry, Frank
Temple Of The Ancient Magical Presence
(FMR)
Lacy, Steve
Shots
(Hatology)
Lacy, Steve Four
Morning Joy ...Paris Live [reissue]
(Hatology)
Parker, Evan
The Ayes Have It
(Emanem)
Beuger, Antoine
Cantor Quartets [2 CDs]
(Another Timbre)
Rodrigues / Malfatti / Guerreiro
Late Summer [2 CDs]
(Creative Sources)
Lacy, Steve & Joe McPhee
The Rest [VINYL]
(Roaratorio)
McPhee, Joe
The Loneliest Woman [CD EP]
(Corbett vs. Dempsey)
Various Artists
Wandelweiser und so weiter [6 CD Box]
(Another Timbre)
Malfatti, Radu / Taku Unami

(erstwhile)
Lacy, Steve
Avignon And After Vol.1
(Emanem)
Lacy, Steve
The Sun
(Emanem)
ISKRA 1903
Goldsmiths
(Emanem)
Bailey, Derek
Concert In Milwaukee
(Incus)
Malfatti, Radu / Keith Rowe
"Phi" [3 CDs]
(erstwhile)
Bailey, Derek
Live at G's Club - Barcelona Chronicles
(Incus)
Lacy, Steve Five
Blinks...Zurich 1983
(hatOLOGY)
Blake, Ran with Ricky Ford and Steve Lacy
That Certain Feeling
(Hatology)
ICP Orchestra
Jubilee Varia
(Hatology)
Malfatti, Radu / Klaus Filip
imaoto
(erstwhile)
Baker, Duck
The Ducks Palace
(Incus)
Honsinger, Tristan & Massimo Simonini
Call Me Us
(I Dischi di Angelica)
Bailey, Derek / Agusti Fernandez
A Silent Dance
(Incus)
Suzuki, Akio / David Toop
Breath - Taking
(Confront)
Westbrook / Rossini
Westbrook-Rossini
(Hatology)
Westbrook, Mike Orchestra
On Duke's Birthday
(Hatology)
Bailey, Derek / Mick Beck / Paul Hession
Meanwhile, Back In Sheffield...
(Discus)
Lacy, Steve
at the New Jazz Meeting Baden-Baden 2002
(Hatology)
News From Babel
Sirens and Silences / Work Resumed on the Tower / Letters Home
(Recommended Records)
Lacy, Steve / Brion Gysin
Songs
(Hatology)
Lacy, Steve Sextet
The Gleam
(Silkheart)
Bailey, Derek
Carpal Tunnel
(Tzadik)
Chadbourne, Eugene
The English Channel
(Chadula)
Trio x 3
New Jazz Meeting Baden-Baden 2002 [2 CDs]
(Hatology)
Polwechsel
Polwechsel
(Hat [now] ART)
Lacy, Steve Five
The Way [2 CDs]
(Hatology)
Gaines, Will / Derek Bailey
Rappin & Tappin
(Incus)
Bailey, Derek
Pieces For Guitar 1966 - 67
(Tzadik)
Recommended & Related Releases:
Other Recommended Releases:
Le Quatuor De Jazz Libre Du Quebec
Musique-Politique Anthologie 1971/1974 [4 CDS]
(Tour de Bras)
Company (Bailey / Frith / Lewis / Parker / Oppens / Le Baron / Suzuki / Tippetts / Toshizawa / Tippett / Wachsmann)
Epiphany [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Honest Jons Records)
Music Improvisation Company, The (Bailey / Parker / Davies / Muir)
1969, 1970 [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Honest Jons Records)
Bailey, Derek / Tony Coe
Time [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Honest Jons Records)
Bailey, Derek & Cyro Baptista
Cyro [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Honest Jons Records)
Bailey, Derek / Tristan Honsinger
Duo [VINYL-DAMAGED]
(Honest Jons Records)
Bailey, Derek
Lot 74 [VINYL-DAMAGED]
(Honest Jons Records)
Bailey, Derek
Aida [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Honest Jons Records)
Bailey, Derek / Tristan Honsinger
Duo [VINYL]
(Honest Jons Records)
Bailey, Derek
Live at G's Club - Barcelona Chronicles
(Incus)
Baker, Duck
The Ducks Palace
(Incus)
Bailey, Derek / Agusti Fernandez
A Silent Dance
(Incus)
Bailey, Derek / Mick Beck / Paul Hession
Meanwhile, Back In Sheffield...
(Discus)
Gaines, Will / Derek Bailey
Rappin & Tappin
(Incus)



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