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Adkins, Michael Quartet (w/ Russ Lossing / Larry Grenadier / Paul Motion): Flaneur (Hatology)

Much is made of Canadian saxophonist Michael Adkin's mid-tempo approach to jazz, heard here in his 3rd album, "Flaneur", which translates to "stroller" or "saunterer", an apt description of the lyrical, unhurried yet technically adept and sophisticated approach taken by his quartet with Russ Lossing on piano, Larry Grenadier on bass and Paul Motian on drums.
 

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product information:


UPC: 752156074526

Label: Hatology
Catalog ID: hatOLOGY 745
Squidco Product Code: 25040

Format: CD
Condition: New
Released: 2018
Country: Austria
Packaging: Cardboard Gatefold 3 Panels
Recorded at Avetar Studios, in New York City, New York, on March 22nd, 2008, by James Farber.


Personnel:

Michael Adkins-tenor saxophone

Russ Lossing-piano

Larry Grenadier-double bass

Paul Motian-drums

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track listing:


1. Archives 6:55

2. Hard Request 7:22

3. We'll See 5:28

4. Numeral 4:40

5. Before You Know It 5:40

6. Grafica 6:48

7. Offerings 6:42

8. Silhouette 9:42
Related Categories of Interest:


Hat Art
Improvised Music
Jazz
Free Improvisation
NY Downtown & Jazz/Improv
Quartet Recordings
Melodic and Lyrical Jazz
New in Improvised Music
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descriptions, reviews, &c.

"There is a tendency to see jazz performance divided between uptempo numbers and ballads, but Michael Adkins is perhaps concerned with something different- a thoughtful, alert, observant gait- Henry David Thoreau preferred to talk about 'sauntering'- that offers the player a new relationship with his surroundings. Adkins' immediate surroundings are familiar enough, the group he unveiled on a previous release is again featured here. Only the bassist is a newcomer. Nothing new here, one might think, except that Adkins does propose a new relationship between the constituent elements. Much has been made of his saxophone sound, which does as Stuart Broomer perceptively noted in the liner notes of Adkins' previous CD sound like a confident appropriation of many decades of saxophone language and jazz styles. Here, though, one is perhaps less immediately struck by the timbre and phrasing of the lead instrument than how it moves through the space defined by the group. The themes in this release invite the listener to join the company, take a stroll, "let him be drawn by the attractions of the terrain" and the encounters he might find there. We walk. We listen. We'll hear."-Brian Morton, from the liner notes



"Canadian saxophonist Michael Adkins' third album, and his second on Hat Hut, Flaneur, arrives in a shroud of mystery. Back in 2008, Adkins released his debut for Hat Hut records, Rotator, but as it is turns out, he recorded another album the same year. It seems incredibly prolific, but it took ten years before it was released and here it is.

Flaneur shows up as a gift out of nowhere, ten years unaccounted for, but in this digital age of mass-information there is certain beauty about it all -like finding an unpublished literary masterpiece in a dusty old suitcase. Now the case is opened, and the content is worth discovering.

Writer Brian Morton gets to the heart of matter when he suggests that the music could be situated in a third space that neither belongs to up-tempo numbers nor ballads. Taking the title of the album as a starting point, the music strolls, but in a way that is both casual and determined. Adkins plays with the cool fire of another tenor, Mark Turner, and like Turner he is able to create an elaborate musical architecture that is also melodically clear in its development.

Adkins is not the only one voice in a quartet that also includes the late legend, drummer Paul Motian, and pianist Russ Lossing. Lossing is not present from the beginning. Instead, the opener "Archives" starts as a trio-piece with bassist Larry Grenadier. There is a curious break in the composition around the five-minute mark where the music seems to end only to start up again -the in-betweenness of stillness and movement becomes quite literal here. When Lossing enters on "Hard Request" with crystalline piano motifs, the music is taken into a dreamy sphere, but there is not the sense of stopping entirely. Instead, these four musicians keep the music in poetic movement.

So, to return to the question of context. Does it really matter when and how the music was recorded and who is Michael Adkins? Listen to this music and you will know it."-Jakob Baekgaard, All About Jazz


Artist Biographies:

"Michael Adkins is an emerging saxophonist and composer, currently living in New York City. His latest recording entitled Rotator, released on HATHUT records has been selected as THE WIRE magazine's Jazz&Improv Album of the year 2008. Michael's new release features Paul Motian on drums, Russ Lossing on piano, and John Hebert on bass.

The result of this new release Rotator on HatHut records is a collection of 8 original compositions from Adkins that lay bold melodies over driving and precise underpinnings. Chris May says, "An important new voice has arrived." Duncan Heining of JAZZ WISE magazine calls it, " A remarkeably mature and confident set featuring eight self-penned tunes, all of which confirm the saxophonist as a jazz composer to watch." Brian Morton of The WIRE magazine says it's, "the best hour of contemporary jazz I've heard this year." From the insistent sonic thrust of the opening track, to the echoing chime of the final cut, this new release on Hat Hut records traverses a musical landscape in which washes of sound surge under melodies, punctuated by moments of raw energy. Paul Motian's incredible artistry and deep openness make its legendary presence felt on the entire recording. Since neither bassist or drummer function in a conventionally rhythmic sense and with the support of pianist Russ Lossing providing immense chordal harmonies, the band members were given tremendous room in which to improvise and to interact.

Saxophonist Michael Adkins grew up in Sarnia, Ontario. A small town on the Michigan Ontario border in close proximity to Detroit. He moved to New York in 1999 from Boston. His formative years were spent sessioning with the top musicians and experimenting with forms of twelve tone composition, metric modulations incorporated into altered song and standard forms, and jazz harmonic structures. In 2005 he released his debut album entitled infotation and soon after began several long-standing musical relationships with some of New York's most original creative musicians. This subsequently led to his current album release Rotator for HatHut records featuring the legendary Paul Motian on drums. Michael was also featured in performance with Paul Motian's group at the Village Vanguard, with Larry Grenadier, Masabumi Kikuchi, and Bill McHenry."

-Weebly (http://496464687454.weebly.com/)
9/12/2018

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"Russ Lossing (born 1960) is an American jazz pianist, composer, improviser, arranger, educator, scholar.

Early life

Lossing was born in Ohio in 1960, and is from Columbus, Ohio. He had classical piano lessons from the age of 5 and began studying jazz aged 13 in Columbus at the Jazz and Contemporary Workshop with Dave Wheeler. After high school Lossing went on the road with a wide variety of bands including jazz, funk, rock, pop and country music for four years before attending university. He obtained a Bachelor of Music in piano at Ohio State University in 1986. In the early 1980s meetings with composer John Cage had a big effect:

We only had two occasions to get together and talk, but any time spent with him was utterly valuable. He read through my scores we played piano together. His thing was creating, not emulating: don't copy; trust YOURSELF. I was already going in this direction but this experience, listening to Cage's concepts and philosophy in this setting, made so much sense.

Later life and career

Lossing has been part of the New York jazz scene since 1986. In 1988 he earned a Master of Music from the Manhattan School of Music. He has led or co-led numerous bands, including: his own trio with Masa Kamaguchi and Billy Mintz; Three-Part Invention with bassist Mark Helias and trumpeter Ralph Alessi; and duos with saxophonist Tim Berne, drummer Gerry Hemingway, and guitarist Ben Monder. Others are: trio with Paul Motian and Ed Schuller (Dreamer and As It Grows); trio with Mat Maneri and Mark Dresser (Metal Rat); trio with John Hebert and Jeff Williams (Phrase 6); quartet with Loren Stillman, John Hebert and Eric McPherson (Personal Tonal); King Vulture with Adam Kolker, Matt Pavolka and Dayeon Seok; and duos with saxophonist Loren Stillman, bassist John Hebert (Line Up,Hatology), and saxophonost Michael Adkins.

Lossing played with drummer Paul Motian over a period of 12 years and recorded Drum Music, a solo piano tribute album to him in 2011. The JazzTimes reviewer of Drum Music commented that "his two-fisted takes on 'Fiasco', 'Dance' and 'Drum Music' capture the great drummer's unpredictable and audacious rhythmic pulse. Lossing's stark re-imaginings of [... other Motian pieces] all vibrate with a new spirit of exploration." Swiss newspaper Der Sonntag wrote that "Drum Music is a stunning improvisational solo recital, a convincing plunge into 10 Motian compositions. This is music in between contemporary jazz and up to date tonal concert music."

Lossing has performed in some of the world's leading jazz festivals including the London, Vienna, Harlem, Cully (Switzerland), Toronto and Venice (Italy) Jazz festivals to name just a few. He has also performed in jazz clubs in New York and Europe including The Village Vanguard (with Paul Motian), Blue Note NYC, The Jazz Standard, Birdland, Porgy and Bess (Vienna), Unterfahrt (Munich), Jazz Club Ferrara (Italy) and many more over a span of 25 years.

In February 2016, Lossing was invited by John Zorn to do a week long residency at The Stone NYC in which he presented 12 of his ensembles over 6 nights.

Lossing has composed over 400 pieces of music in many genres including jazz, contemporary classical (solo piano works, string quartets, orchestral works and song cycles), song writing in various styles, pop, rock, funk, fusion (in early life), film scoring (30+ films).[citation needed] In 2015, he founded the record label Aqua Piazza."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russ_Lossing)
9/12/2018

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"As one of contemporary jazz's most respected and accomplished bassists, Larry Grenadier has built an expansive body of work that encompasses a variety of significant projects with many of the genre's most inventive and influential musicians. Over the course of a performing and recording career that spans three decades, he's earned a far-reaching reputation, for his instrumental talent, for his instantly recognizable tone, and for the sensitivity, imagination and creative curiosity that have established him as an in-demand sideman and valued collaborator.

Grenadier's trademark upright bass work has been a longstanding fixture in the bands of pianist Brad Mehldau and guitarist Pat Metheny, and has graced albums by a broad array of prestigious artists, including Paul Motian, Charles Lloyd, Enrico Rava, Danilo Perez, Chris Potter, Joshua Redman and Kurt Rosenwinkel. He's also found time to make three albums with his own acclaimed trio Fly, and to record five more with his wife, noted singer-songwriter Rebecca Martin."

-Larry Grenadier Website (http://larrygrenadier.com/about/biography/2013-short-form/)
9/12/2018

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"Stephen Paul Motian (March 25, 1931 - November 22, 2011) was an American jazz drummer, percussionist, and composer. Motian played an important role in freeing jazz drummers from strict time-keeping duties.

He first came to prominence in the late 1950s in the piano trio of Bill Evans, and later was a regular in pianist Keith Jarrett's band for about a decade (c. 1967-1976). Motian began his career as a bandleader in the early 1970s. Perhaps his two most notable groups were a longstanding trio of guitarist Bill Frisell and saxophonist Joe Lovano, and the Electric Bebop Band which featured the drummer working mostly with younger musicians doing interpretations of bebop standards.

Motian was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and raised in Providence, Rhode Island. He is of Armenian descent. After playing guitar in his childhood, Motian began playing the drums at age 12, eventually touring New England in a swing band. During the Korean War he joined the Navy.

Motian became a professional musician in 1954, and briefly played with pianist Thelonious Monk. He became well known as the drummer in pianist Bill Evans's trio (1959-64), initially alongside bassist Scott LaFaro and later with Chuck Israels.

Subsequently, he played with pianists Paul Bley (1963-64) and Keith Jarrett (1967-76). Other musicians with whom Motian performed and/or recorded in the early period of his career included Lennie Tristano, Warne Marsh, Lee Konitz, Joe Castro, Arlo Guthrie (Motian performed briefly with Guthrie in 1968-69, and performed with the singer at Woodstock), Carla Bley, Charlie Haden, and Don Cherry. Motian subsequently worked with musicians such as Marilyn Crispell, Bill Frisell, Leni Stern, Joe Lovano, Alan Pasqua, Bill McHenry, Stéphan Oliva, Frank Kimbrough, Eric Watson and many more.

Later in his career, Motian became an important composer and group leader, recording initially for ECM Records in the 1970s and early 1980s and then for Soul Note, JMT, and Winter & Winter before returning to ECM in 2005. From the early 1980s he led a trio featuring guitarist Bill Frisell and saxophonist Joe Lovano, occasionally joined by bassists Ed Schuller, Charlie Haden, or Marc Johnson, and other musicians, including Jim Pepper, Lee Konitz, Dewey Redman and Geri Allen. In addition to playing Motian's compositions, the group recorded tributes to Thelonious Monk and Bill Evans, and a series of Paul Motian on Broadway albums, featuring original interpretations of jazz standards.

Despite his important associations with pianists, Motian's work as a leader since the 1970s rarely included a pianist in his ensembles and relied heavily on guitarists. Motian's first instrument was the guitar, and he apparently retained an affinity for the instrument: in addition to his groups with Frisell, his first two solo albums on ECM featured Sam Brown, and his Electric Bebop Band featured two and occasionally three electric guitars. The group was founded in the early 1990s, and featured a variety of young guitar and saxophone players, in addition to electric bass and Motian's drums, including saxophonists Joshua Redman, Chris Potter, Chris Cheek, and Tony Malaby, and guitarists Kurt Rosenwinkel, Brad Shepik, Wolfgang Muthspiel, Steve Cardenas, Ben Monder, and Jakob Bro.

In 2011 Motian featured on a number of new recordings, including Live at Birdland (with Lee Konitz, Brad Mehldau and Charlie Haden), Samuel Blaser's Consort in Motion, No Comment by Augusto Pirodda, and Further Explorations with Chick Corea and Eddie Gómez. Bill McHenry's Ghosts of the Sun was released - by coincidence - on the day of Motian's death. Motian's final album as bandleader was The Windmills of Your Mind, featuring Bill Frisell, Thomas Morgan and Petra Haden.

Motian died on November 22, 2011 at New York's Mount Sinai Hospital of complications from myelodysplastic syndrome."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Motian)
9/12/2018

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