The Squid's Ear Magazine

  Rapid SSL

  PayPal

  Mastercard

  Visa

  Discover

  American Express



© 2002-2017, Squidco LLC


Brotzmann, Peter Sextet/ Quartet: Nipples [VINYL] (Cien Fuegos)

A legendary and intense album of European Free Improvising masters recorded in 1969 from a band led by saxophonist Peter Brotzmann, with Evan Parker on tenor sax; Derek Bailey on guitar; Fred van Hove on piano; Buschi Niebergall on bass; and Han Bennink on drums.
 

Price: $34.95


Quantity:

Out of Stock


Shipping Weight: 18.00 units

Quantity in Basket: None

Log In to use our Wish List
product information:


180 gram vinyl, raised image on cover. Limited edition of 1000 copies.

UPC: 9120036682115

Label: Cien Fuegos
Catalog ID: CF 013LP
Squidco Product Code: 21482

Format: LP
Condition: New
Released: 2015
Country: Austria
Packaging: LP
SIDE A recorded Tonstudio Bauer/Ludwigsburg/April 18th, 1969

SIDE B recorded Rhenus Studio/Godorf/April 24th, 1969


Personnel:

Peter Brotzmann-tenor saxophone

Evan Parker-tenor saxophone

Derek Bailey-guitar

Fred van Hove-piano

Buschi Niebergall-bass

Han Bennink-drums

Highlight an artist name or instrument above
and click here to Search
track listing:


SIDE A

1. Nipples (17:45)

SIDE B



1. Tell a Green Man (15:32)
Related Categories of Interest:


Vinyl Recordings
Improvised Music
European Improv, Free Jazz & Related
Free Improvisation
Peter Brotzmann
Bailey, Derek
Parker, Evan
Sextet Recordings
Quartet Recordings
Staff Picks & Recommended Items
Jazz Reissues
New in Improvised Music
Recent Releases and Best Sellers
Instant Rewards

sample the album:








descriptions, reviews, &c.

"Nipples is a 1969 album by free jazz saxophonist Peter Brštzmann, originally released on the Calig record label. The title track is performed by a sextet comprising Brštzmann (tenor saxophone), Evan Parker (also on tenor saxophone), Derek Bailey (guitar), Fred Van Hove (piano), Han Bennink (drums), and Buschi Niebergall (bass). The other track featured, "Tell a Green Man", is performed by a quartet made up of Brštzmann, Van Hove, Niebergall, and Bennink.

The album was reissued on CD by Atavistic Records as part of their Unheard Music Series in 2000. The label also released a second CD in 2003 titled More Nipples, featuring three further recordings from the same sessions: an alternate take of "Nipples", performed by the sextet, and two further recordings by the quartet."-Wikipedia



" [...] Nipples is a 1969 recording, freshly re-released by Atavistic, of a famous session featuring some of the biggest names in European free jazz. The creature I thought was going to take my life, the title track, is nearly 20 minutes of amorphous noise recorded by a sextet consisting of piano, double-bass, drums, guitar and two saxes. The second track is slightly shorter and slimmed down: fifteen minutes of sax, piano, double-bass and drums. The entire album clocks in at just over 33 minutes, but they're some of the most frenetic and alien minutes you may ever live through.

Initially, Nipples seems like the work of a sextet of toddlers who have been unleashed in a room full of musical instruments. It's grating and frustrating, and seems to exhibit a lack of structure surprising even for free jazz. After the third or fourth time through, though, a logic begins to present itself. Blocks of instruments drop in and out to highlight the tensions between the various sounds with a bowed double-bass and sax often serving as a foundation for the movements of other instruments. These six people listen to each other, coordinating their movements over a framework that remains invisible throughout. Stereo effects are used to enforce a sort of organization, marking out the individual territories of the various instruments.

The first of the two tracks is the most rewarding, and achieves an almost mesmeric effect that the second track never gets close to. The presence of two saxes contributes quite a bit to this: they carry on a conversation of sorts that makes the 20 minutes of noise slide by quicker than seems possible. At points, it becomes difficult to believe that this music was recorded live in the studio-- these people make noises with their instruments and construct a layered sound that eludes most players with walls of effects at their disposal.

There's a point about two-thirds of the way through Nipples where all the instruments-- with the exception of Peter Brotzmann's tenor sax-- stop playing. For about one minute, the sax emits long, almost toneless keenings. The sound just doesn't make sense. Then, you realize that Peter Brotzman has stopped playing his saxophone, and Papa Legba has taken over instead. Papa Legba is riding this man's sax-- a human being could not possibly be responsible for a noise like this.

Today's musical landscape is marred by the footprints of lightweights and the layabouts who write about them. Emo-rockers who record albums while cramming for the SATs? So-called Latin superstars who have to see a tutor before recording a song in Spanish? Überhip geeks who spend less time and energy on their music than on installing home theaters in the mansions of famous murder victims? Forget it. Nipples may be by turns aggravating, inscrutable, cacophonous and soulless, but sitting next to today's crop on the New Release rack of your local Sam Goody, it seems the work of giants. Crazy, strung-out, Teutonic giants, but giants nonetheless."- Zach Hooker, Pitchfork Media


180 gram vinyl, raised image on cover. Limited edition of 1000 copies.

Get additional information at Pitchfork Media

Artist Biographies:

"Born Remscheid, Germany on 6 March 1941; soprano, alto, tenor, baritone and bass saxophones, a-clarinet, e-flat clarinet; bass clarinet, tarogato.

Peter Brötzmann's early interest was in painting and he attended the art academy in Wuppertal. Being very dissatisfied with the gallery/exhibition situation in art he found greater satisfaction playing with semi-professional musicians, though continued to paint (as well as retaining a level of control over his own records, particularly in record sleeve/CD booklet design). In late 2005 he had a major retrospective exhibition jointly with Han Bennink - two separate buildings separated by an inter-connecting glass corridor - in Brötzmann's home town of Remscheid.

Self-taught on clarinets, he soon moved to saxophones and began playing swing/bebop, before meeting Peter Kowald. During 1962/63 Brötzmann, Kowald and various drummers played regularly - Mingus, Ornette Coleman, etc. - while experiencing freedoms from a different perspective via Stockhausen, Nam June Paik, David Tudor and John Cage. In the mid 1960s, he played with American musicians such as Don Cherry and Steve Lacy and, following a sojourn in Paris with Don Cherry, returned to Germany for his unorthodox approach to be accepted by local musicians like Alex von Schlippenbach and Manfred Schoof.

The trio of Peter Brötzmann, Peter Kowald and Sven-Ake Johansson began playing in 1965/66 and it was a combination of this and the Schoof/Schlippenbach Quintet that gave rise to the first Globe Unity Orchestra. Following the self-production of his first two LPs, For Adolphe Sax and Machine gun for his private label, BRÖ, a recording for Manfred Eicher's 'Jazz by Post' (JAPO) [Nipples], and a number of concert recordings with different sized groups, Brötzmann worked with Jost Gebers and started the FMP label. He also began to work more regularly with Dutch musicians, forming a trio briefly with Willem Breuker and Han Bennink before the long-lasting group with Han Bennink and Fred Van Hove. As a trio, and augmented with other musicians who could stand the pace (e.g. Albert Mangelsdorff on, for example, The Berlin concert), this lasted until the mid-1970s though Brötzmann and Bennink continued to play and record as a duo, and in other combinations, after this time. A group with Harry Miller and Louis Moholo continued the trio format though was cut short by Miller's early death.

The thirty-plus years of playing and recording free jazz and improvised music have produced, even on just recorded evidence, a list of associates and one-off combinations that include just about all the major figures in this genre: Derek Bailey (including performances with Company (e.g. Incus 51), Cecil Taylor, Fred Hopkins, Rashied Ali, Evan Parker, Keiji Haino, Misha Mengelberg, Anthony Braxton, Marilyn Crispell, Andrew Cyrille, Phil Minton, Alfred 23 Harth, Tony Oxley. Always characterised as an energy player - and the power-rock setting of Last Exit with Ronald Shannon Jackson, Sonny Sharock and Bill Laswell, or his duo performances with his son, Casper, did little to disperse this conviction - his sound is one of the most distinctive, life-affirming and joyous in all music. But the variety of Brötzmann's playing and projects is less recognised: his range of solo performances; his medium-to-large groups and, in spite of much ad hoc work, a stability brought about from a corpus of like- minded musicians: the group Ruf der Heimat; pianist Borah Bergman; percussionist Hamid Drake; and Die like a dog, his continuing tribute to Albert Ayler, with Drake, William Parker and Toshinori Kondo. Peter Brötzmann continues a heavy touring schedule which, since 1996 has seen annual visits to Japan and semi-annual visits to the thriving Chicago scene where he has played in various combinations from solo through duo (including one, in 1997, with Mats Gustafsson) to large groups such as the Chicago Octet/Tentet, described below. He has also released a number of CDs on the Chicago-based Okka Disk label, including the excellent trio with Hamid Drake and the Moroccan Mahmoud Gania, at times sounding like some distant muezzin calling the faithful to become lost in the rhythm and power of the music.

The "Chicago Tentet" was first organized by Brötzmann with the assistance of writer/presenter John Corbett in January 1997 as an idea for a one-time octet performance that included Hamid Drake and Michael Zerang (drums), Kent Kessler (bass) and Fred Lomberg-Holm (cello), Ken Vandermark and Mars Williams (reeds), and Jeb Bishop (trombone). The first meeting was extremely strong and warranted making the group an ongoing concern and in September of that same year the band was expanded to include Mats Gustafsson (reeds) and Joe McPhee (brass) as permanent members (with guest appearances by William Parker (bass), Toshinori Kondo (trumpet/electronics), and Roy Campbell (trumpet) during its tenure) - all in all a veritable who's who of the contemporary improvising scene's cutting edge. Though the Tentet is clearly led by Brötzmann and guided by his aesthetics, he has been committed to utilizing the compositions of other members in the ensemble since the beginning. This has allowed the band to explore an large range of structural and improvising tactics: from the conductions of Mats Gustafsson and Fred Lonberg-Holm, to the vamp pieces of Michael Zerang and Hamid Drake, to compositions using conventional notation by Ken Vandermark and Mars Williams, to Brötzmann's graphic scores - the group employs almost every contemporary approach to composing for an improvising unit. This diversity in compositional style, plus the variety in individualistic approaches to improvisation, allows the Tentet to play extremely multifaceted music. As the band moves from piece to piece, it explores intensities that range from spare introspection to all out walls of sound, and rhythms that are open or free from a steady pulse to those of a heavy hitting groove. It is clear that the difficult economics of running a large band hasn't prevented the group from continuing to work together since its first meeting. Through their effort they've been able to develop an ensemble sound and depth of communication hard to find in a band of any size or style currently playing on the contemporary music scene."

-EFI (European Free Improvisation Pages) (http://www.efi.group.shef.ac.uk/mbrotzm.html)
11/20/2017

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Evan Parker was born in Bristol in 1944 and began to play the saxophone at the age of 14. Initially he played alto and was an admirer of Paul Desmond; by 1960 he had switched to tenor and soprano, following the example of John Coltrane, a major influence who, he would later say, determined "my choice of everything". In 1962 he went to Birmingham University to study botany but a trip to New York, where he heard the Cecil Taylor trio (with Jimmy Lyons and Sunny Murray), prompted a change of mind. What he heard was "music of a strength and intensity to mark me for life ... l came back with my academic ambitions in tatters and a desperate dream of a life playing that kind of music - 'free jazz' they called it then."

Parker stayed in Birmingham for a time, often playing with pianist Howard Riley. In 1966 he moved to London, became a frequent visitor to the Little Theatre Club, centre of the city's emerging free jazz scene, and was soon invited by drummer John Stevens to join the innovative Spontaneous Music Ensemble which was experimenting with new kinds of group improvisation. Parker's first issued recording was SME's 1968 Karyobin, with a line-up of Parker, Stevens, Derek Bailey, Dave Holland and Kenny Wheeler. Parker remained in SME through various fluctuating line-ups - at one point it comprised a duo of Stevens and himself - but the late 1960s also saw him involved in a number of other fruitful associations.

He began a long-standing partnership with guitarist Bailey, with whom he formed the Music Improvisation Company and, in 1970, co-founded Incus Records. (Tony Oxley, in whose sextet Parker was then playing, was a third co-founder; Parker left Incus in the mid-1980s.) Another important connection was with the bassist Peter Kowald who introduced Parker to the German free jazz scene. This led to him playing on Peter Brötzmann's 1968 Machine Gun, Manfred Schoof's 1969 European Echoes and, in 1970, joining pianist Alex von Schlippenbach and percussionist Paul Lovens in the former's trio, of which he is still a member: their recordings include Pakistani Pomade, Three Nails Left, Detto Fra Di Noi, Elf Bagatellen and Physics.

Parker pursued other European links, too, playing in the Pierre Favre Quartet (with Kowald and Swiss pianist Irene Schweizer) and in the Dutch Instant Composers Pool of Misha Mengelberg and Han Bennink. The different approaches to free jazz he encountered proved both a challenging and a rewarding experience. He later recalled that the German musicians favoured a "robust, energy-based thing, not to do with delicacy or detailed listening but to do with a kind of spirit-raising, a shamanistic intensity. And l had to find a way of surviving in the heat of that atmosphere ... But after a while those contexts became more interchangeable and more people were involved in the interactions, so all kinds of hybrid musics came out, all kinds of combinations of styles."

A vital catalyst for these interactions were the large ensembles in which Parker participated in the 1970s: Schlippenbach's Globe Unity Orchestra, Chris McGregor's Brotherhood of Breath, Barry Guy's London Jazz Composers Orchestra (LJCO) and occasional big bands led by Kenny Wheeler. In the late 70s Parker also worked for a time in Wheeler's small group, recording Around Six and, in 1980, he formed his own trio with Guy and LJCO percussionist Paul Lytton (with whom he had already been working in a duo for nearly a decade). This group, together with the Schlippenbach trio, remains one of Parker's top musical priorities: their recordings include Tracks, Atlanta, Imaginary Values, Breaths and Heartbeats, The Redwood Sessions and At the Vortex. In 1980, Parker directed an Improvisers Symposium in Pisa and, in 1981, he organised a special project at London's Actual Festival. By the end of the 1980s he had played in most European countries and had made various tours to the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. ln 1990, following the death of Chris McGregor, he was instrumental in organising various tributes to the pianist and his fellow Blue Notes; these included two discs by the Dedication Orchestra, Spirits Rejoice and lxesa.

Though he has worked extensively in both large and small ensembles, Parker is perhaps best known for his solo soprano saxophone music, a singular body of work that in recent years has centred around his continuing exploration of techniques such as circular breathing, split tonguing, overblowing, multiphonics and cross-pattern fingering. These are technical devices, yet Parker's use of them is, he says, less analytical than intuitive; he has likened performing his solo work to entering a kind of trance-state. The resulting music is certainly hypnotic, an uninterrupted flow of snaky, densely-textured sound that Parker has described as "the illusion of polyphony". Many listeners have indeed found it hard to credit that one man can create such intricate, complex music in real time. Parker's first solo recordings, made in 1974, were reissued on the Saxophone Solos CD in 1995; more recent examples are Conic Sections and Process and Reality, on the latter of which he does, for the first time, experiment with multi-tracking. Heard alone on stage, few would disagree with writer Steve Lake that "There is, still, nothing else in music - jazz or otherwise - that remotely resembles an Evan Parker solo concert."

While free improvisation has been Parker's main area of activity over the last three decades, he has also found time for other musical pursuits: he has played in 'popular' contexts with Annette Peacock, Scott Walker and the Charlie Watts big band; he has performed notated pieces by Gavin Bryars, Michael Nyman and Frederic Rzewski; he has written knowledgeably about various ethnic musics in Resonance magazine. A relatively new field of interest for Parker is improvising with live electronics, a dialogue he first documented on the 1990 Hall of Mirrors CD with Walter Prati. Later experiments with electronics in the context of larger ensembles have included the Synergetics - Phonomanie III project at Ullrichsberg in 1993 and concerts by the new EP2 (Evan Parker Electronic Project) in Berlin, Nancy and at the 1995 Stockholm Electronic Music Festival where Parker's regular trio improvised with real-time electronics processed by Prati, Marco Vecchi and Phillip Wachsmann. "Each of the acoustic instrumentalists has an electronic 'shadow' who tracks him and feeds a modified version of his output back to the real-time flow of the music."

The late 80s and 90s brought Parker the chance to play with some of his early heroes. He worked with Cecil Taylor in small and large groups, played with Coltrane percussionist Rashied Ali, recorded with Paul Bley: he also played a solo set as support to Ornette Coleman when Skies of America received its UK premiere in 1988. The same period found Parker renewing his acquaintance with American colleagues such as Anthony Braxton, Steve Lacy and George Lewis, with all of whom he had played in the 1970s (often in the context of London's Company festivals). His 1993 duo concert with Braxton moved John Fordham in The Guardian to raptures over "saxophone improvisation of an intensity, virtuosity, drama and balance to tax the memory for comparison".

Parker's 50th birthday in 1994 brought celebratory concerts in several cities, including London, New York and Chicago. The London performance, featuring the Parker and Schlippenbach trios, was issued on a highly-acclaimed two-CD set, while participants at the American concerts included various old friends as well as more recent collaborators in Borah Bergman and Joe Lovano. The NYC radio station WKCR marked the occasion by playing five days of Parker recordings. 1994 also saw the publication of the Evan Parker Discography, compiled by ltalian writer Francesco Martinelli, plus chapters on Parker in books on contemporary musics by John Corbett and Graham Lock.

Parker's future plans involve exploring further possibilities in electronics and the development of his solo music. They also depend to a large degree on continuity of the trios, of the large ensembles, of his more occasional yet still long-standing associations with that pool of musicians to whose work he remains attracted. This attraction, he explained to Coda's Laurence Svirchev, is attributable to "the personal quality of an individual voice". The players to whom he is drawn "have a language which is coherent, that is, you know who the participants are. At the same time, their language is flexible enough that they can make sense of playing with each other ... l like people who can do that, who have an intensity of purpose." "

-Evan Parker Website (http://evanparker.com/biography.php)
11/20/2017

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Derek Bailey (29 January 1930 - 25 December 2005) was an English avant-garde guitarist and leading figure in the free improvisation movement.

Bailey was born in Sheffield, England. A third-generation musician, he began playing the guitar at the age of ten, initially studying music with his teacher and Sheffield City organist C. H. C. Biltcliffe, an experience that he did not enjoy, and guitar with his uncle George Wing and John Duarte. As an adult he worked as a guitarist and session musician in clubs, radio, dance hall bands, and so on, playing with many performers including Morecambe and Wise, Gracie Fields, Bob Monkhouse and Kathy Kirby, and on television programs such as Opportunity Knocks. Bailey's earliest foray into 'what could be called free improvised music' was in 1953 with two other guitarists in their shared flat in Glasgow. He was also part of a Sheffield-based trio founded in 1963 with Tony Oxley and Gavin Bryars called "Joseph Holbrooke" (named after the composer, whose work they never actually played). Although originally performing relatively "conventional" modal, harmonic jazz this group became increasingly free in direction.

Bailey moved to London in 1966, frequenting the Little Theatre Club run by drummer John Stevens. Here he met many other like-minded musicians, such as saxophonist Evan Parker, trumpet player Kenny Wheeler and double bass player Dave Holland. These players often collaborated under the umbrella name of the Spontaneous Music Ensemble, recording the seminal album Karyobin for Island Records in 1968. In this year Bailey also formed the Music Improvisation Company with Parker, percussionist Jamie Muir and Hugh Davies on homemade electronics, a project that continued until 1971. He was also a member of the Jazz Composer's Orchestra and Iskra 1903, a trio with double-bass player Barry Guy and tromboneist Paul Rutherford that was named after a newspaper published by the Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin.

In 1970, Bailey founded the record label Incus with Tony Oxley, Evan Parker and Michael Walters. It proved influential as the first musician-owned independent label in the UK. Oxley and Walters left early on; Parker and Bailey continued as co-directors until the mid-1980s, when friction between the men led to Parker's departure. Bailey continued the label with his partner Karen Brookman until his death in 2005[citation needed].

Along with a number of other musicians, Bailey was a co-founder of Musics magazine in 1975. This was described as "an impromental experivisation arts magazine" and circulated through a network of like-minded record shops, arguably becoming one of the most significant jazz publications of the second half of the 1970s, and instrumental in the foundation of the London Musicians Collective.

1976 saw Bailey instigate Company, an ever-changing collection of like-minded improvisors, which at various times has included Anthony Braxton, Tristan Honsinger, Misha Mengelberg, Lol Coxhill, Fred Frith, Steve Beresford, Steve Lacy, Johnny Dyani, Leo Smith, Han Bennink, Eugene Chadbourne, Henry Kaiser, John Zorn, Buckethead and many others. Company Week, an annual week-long free improvisational festival organised by Bailey, ran until 1994.

In 1980, he wrote the book Improvisation: Its Nature and Practice. This was adapted by UK's Channel 4 into a four-part TV series in the early '90s, edited and narrated by Bailey.

Bailey died in London on Christmas Day, 2005. He had been suffering from motor neurone disease."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derek_Bailey_(guitarist))
11/20/2017

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Fred Van Hove (born 1937) is a Belgian jazz musician and a pioneer of European free jazz. He is a pianist, accordionist, church organist, and carillonist, an improviser and a composer. He is known for his work in the 1960s and 1970s with saxophonist Peter Brötzmann and drummer Han Bennink and for his subsequent work in various duos and as a solo artist.

Fred Van Hove (born 1937) is a Belgian jazz musician and a pioneer of European free jazz. He is a pianist, accordionist, church organist, and carillonist, an improviser and a composer. He is known for his work in the 1960s and 1970s with saxophonist Peter Brötzmann and drummer Han Bennink and for his subsequent work in various duos and as a solo artist."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Van_Hove)
11/20/2017

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Drummer and multi-instrumentalist Han Bennink was born in Zaandam near Amsterdam in 1942. His first percussion instrument was a kitchen chair. Later his father, an orchestra percussionist, supplied him with a more conventional outfit, but Han never lost his taste for coaxing sounds from unlikely objects he finds backstage at concerts. He is still very fond of playing chairs.

In Holland in the 1960s, Bennink was quickly recognized as an uncommonly versatile drummer. As a hard swinger in the tradition of his hero Kenny Clarke, he accompanied touring American jazz stars, including Sonny Rollins, Ben Webster, Wes Montgomery, Johnny Griffin, Eric Dolphy and Dexter Gordon. He is heard with Gordon on the 1969 album "Live at Amsterdam Paradiso" (on the Affinity label) and with Dolphy on 1964s "Last Date" (PolyGram). At the same time, Bennink participated in the creation of a European improvised music which began to evolve a new identity, apart from its jazz roots. With fellow Dutch pioneers, pianist Misha Mengelberg and saxophonist Willem Breuker, he founded the musicians collective Instant Composers Pool in 1967. Bennink anchored various bands led by Mengelberg or Breuker, and appeared in their comic music-theater productions.

Bennink attended art school in the 1960s, and is also a successful visual artist in several media, often constructing sculpture from found objects, which may include broken drum heads and sticks. He has designed the covers for many LPs and CDs on which he appears. Bennink is represented by Amsterdam's Galerie Espace, and has been the subject of several one-man shows, including one at the Gemeente Museum in the Hague in 1995.

In 1966, Bennink played the US's Newport Jazz Festival with the Mengelberg quartet. From the late 1960s through the '70s Bennink collaborated frequently with Danish, German, English and Belgian musicians, notably saxophonists John Tchicai and Peter Broetzmann, guitarist Derek Bailey and pianist Fred van Hove. Bennink, Broetzmann and van Hove had a longstanding trio well documented on FMP Records. There Bennink also showcased his talents on clarinet, trombone, soprano saxophone and many other instruments, also featured in a series of solo albums he began in 1971.

Bennink's many recordings from the 1980s include sessions with Mengelberg's ICP Orchestra (where he remains), South African bassist Harry Miller, soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy, trombonists Roswell Rudd and George Lewis, and big-bandleaders Sean Bergin and Andy Sheppard.

From 1988 to'98 Bennink's main vehicle was Clusone 3, with saxophonist and clarinetist Michael Moore and cellist Ernst Reijseger, a band noted for its free-wheeling mix of swinging jazz standards, wide-open improvising, and tender ballads. Clusone played Europe and North America, West Africa, China, Vietnam and Australia, and recorded five CDs for Gramavision, hat Art and Ramboy.

Nowadays he is frequently heard with tenor saxophonist Tobias Delius's quartet and in a trio with pianist/keyboardist Cor Fuhler and bassist Wilbert de Joode, and he still collaborates occasionally with jazz luminaries such as Johnny Griffin, Von Freeman and Ray Anderson.

A conspicuous feature of Bennink's musical life since the 1960s is the spontaneous duo concert with musicians of many nationalities and musical inclinations; in the '90s he recorded in duo with among others pianists Mengelberg, Irene Schweizer and Myra Melford, guitarist Eugene Chadbourne, trumpeter Dave Douglas and tenor saxophonist Ellery Eskelin.

Since 2008 Han Bennink has his own Han Bennink Trio consisting of Han Bennink, Joachim Badenhorst on clarinet and Simon Toldam on piano."

-Han Bennink Website, Kevin Whitehead (http://www.hanbennink.com/music/biography/biography.php)
11/20/2017

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

Other Releases With These Artists:
Maneri, Mat / Evan Parker / Lucian Ban
Sounding Tears
(Clean Feed)
Schiano, Mario
Social Security
(Les Disques Victo)
Braxton, Anthony
Ensemble (Victoriaville) 1988
(Les Disques Victo)
Parker, Evan / John Edwards / Steve Noble
PEN
(Dropa Disc)
Bauer, Johannes / Peter Brotzmann
Blue City (Live At Blue City Osaka / Japan 16. October 1997)
(Trost Records)
Brotzmann / Van Hove / Bennink (w/ Albert Mangelsdorff)
The End [VINYL]
(Cien Fuegos)
Brotzmann / Van Hove / Bennink (w/ Albert Mangelsdorff)
Couscouss de la Mauresque [VINYL]
(Cien Fuegos)
Brotzmann / Van Hove / Bennink (w/ Albert Mangelsdorff)
Elements [VINYL]
(Cien Fuegos)
Bailey, Derek / Joelle Leandre / George Lewis / Evan Parker
28 Rue Dunois Juillet 1982
(Fou Records)
Parker, Evan / John Russel / Ian Brighton / Phillip Wachsmann / Marcio Mattos / Trevor Taylor
Live From Cafe Oto
(FMR)
Parker, Evan / Andrea Centazzo
Duets 71977
(Ictus)
Black Bombaim & Peter Brotzmann
Black Bombaim & Peter Brotzmann [VINYL]
(Shhpuma)
Parker, Evan / Daunik Lazro / Joe McPhee
Seven Pieces. Live At Willisau 1995
(Clean Feed)
Peacock, Annette & Paul Bley
Dual Unity
(Bamboo)
Escreet, John (w/ Evan Parker / John Hebert / Tyshawn Sorey)
The Unknown (Live in Concert)
(Sunnyside Records)
Parker, Evan / Pat Thomas / John Russell / John Edwards / Alex Ward / Alison Blunt / Benedict Taylor / David Leahy / Kay Grant
Mopomoso Tour 2013 | Making Rooms [4 CD BOX SET]
(Weekertoft)
Spontaneous Music Orchestra
Search & Reflect (1973-81) [2 CDs]
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan / Mark Nauseef / Toma Gouband
As The Wind
(psi)
Black Bombaim & Peter Brotzmann
Black Bombaim & Peter Brotzmann
(Shhpuma)
Brotzmann, Peter / Steve Noble / John Edwards
The Worse The Better
(Otoroku)
Konstrukt / Peter Brotzmann / Huseyin Ertunc / Dogan Dogusel / Barlas Tan Ozemek
Eklisia Sunday [VINYL]
(Holidays Records)
Chadbourne, Eugene
Boogie With The Hook
(Leo)
Brotzmann, Peter / William Parker / Hamid Drake
Song Sentimentale [VINYL]
(Otoroku)
Spontaneous Music Ensemble
Withdrawal (1966/7)[REISSUE]
(Emanem)
Full Blast (Brotzmann / Pliakas / Wertmuller)
Risc [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Trost Records)
Full Blast (Brotzmann / Pliakas / Wertmuller)
Risc
(Trost Records)
Hawkins, Alexander / Evan Parker
Leaps in Leicester
(Clean Feed)
Parker, Evan / Seymour Wright
Tie the Stone to the Wheel
(Fataka)
Bailey, Derek / John Tilbury
Playing with a Dead Person [VINYL]
(Bolt)
Peter, Brotzmann / Fred Hopkins / Rashied Ali
Songlines [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Trost Records)
Brotzmann, Peter / Fred Hopkins / Rashied Ali
Songlines
(Trost Records)
Brotzmann, Peter Group
Alarm [VINYL]
(Cien Fuegos)
Guy, Barry / Eddie Prevost / Evan Parker / Keith Rowe
Supersession [REMASTERED, REPACKAGED, ADDITIONAL TEXT]
(Matchless)
Last Exit
Iron Path [VINYL]
(ESP)
Parker, Evan / Joe Morris / Nate Wooley
Ninth Square
(Clean Feed)
ISKRA 1903 (Rutherford / Bailey / Guy)
Chapter One (1970-2) [3 CDs]
(Emanem)
Russell, John (with Phil Minton, Thurston Moore, Evan Parker, &c.)
With...
(Emanem)
Frith, Fred / Evan Parker
Hello, I Must Be Going
(Les Disques Victo)
Last Exit
Iron Path
(ESP)
Brotzmann / McPhee / Kessler / Zerang
Tales Out Of Time
(Hatology)
Parker, Evan
Monoceros
(psi)
Schlippenbach Trio
First Recordings [VINYL]
(Trost Records)
Schlippenbach Trio
First Recordings
(Trost Records)
Parker, Evan ElectroAcoustic Septet
Seven
(Les Disques Victo)
Spontaneous Music Ensemble
Oliv & Familie (1968-9)
(Emanem)
Whammies, The (Dijkstra / Oliver / Karayorgis / Roebke / Bishop / Bennink)
Play The Music of Steve Lacy Vol. 3, Live
(Driff Records)
Brotzmann, Peter / Sonny Sharrock
Whatthefuckdoyouwant
(Trost Records)
Parker, Evan & Sylvie Courvoisier
Either Or And
(Relative Pitch)
Yoshihide, Otomo / Sachiko M / Evan Parker / John Edwards / Tony Marsh / John Butcher
Quintet/Sextet/Duos
(Otoroku)
Bailey, Derek / Trevor Watts / John Stevens
Dynamics of the Impromptu
(FMR)
Brotzmann, Peter / Harry Miller / Louis Moholo
Opened, But Hardly Touched [VINYL 2 LPs]
(Cien Fuegos)
Brotzmann Trio, Peter
For Adolphe Sax [VINYL]
(Cien Fuegos)
Parker, Evan / John Edwards / Mark Sanders
The Two Seasons
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan
The Ayes Have It
(Emanem)
Bailey, Derek
Fairly Early with Postscripts
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan / Barry Guy / Paul Lytton
At The Vortex
(Emanem)
Various Artists
Freedom of the City 2002 - small groups [2 CDs]
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan & Joe Mcphee
What / If / They Both Could Fly [VINYL]
(Rune Grammofon)
Parker, Evan & Joe Mcphee
What / If / They Both Could Fly
(Rune Grammofon)
Bailey, Derek & Simon H. Fell
The Complete 15th August 2001
(Confront)
Rocket Science
Evan Parker / Peter Evans / Craig Taborn / Sam Pluta
(More Is More)
McGregor, Chris' Brotherhood Of Breath
Procession - Live at Toulouse
(Ogun)
Spontaneous Music Ensemble
Challenge (1966-7)
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan / Barry Guy / Paul Lytton
Live at Maya Recordings Festival [VINYL 2 LPs]
(NoBusiness)
Quat Quartet (Fred Van Hove, Els Vandeweyer, Paul Lovens, Martin Blume)
Live at Hasselt
(NoBusiness)
Schlippenbach, Alexander Von
The Living Music [VINYL]
(Cien Fuegos)
Spontaneous Music Ensemble
Summer 1967
(Emanem)
Butcher, John
Vortices & Angels
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan
Lines Burnt In Light
(psi)
Parker, Evan / Paul Lytton
Collective Calls (Urban)
(psi)
Bennink / Evan Parker, Han
The Grass Is Greener
(psi)
Gratkowski / Van Hove / Oxley
GratHovOx
(Nuscope)
The Whammies (Dijkstra / Oliver / Karayorgis / Roebke / Bishop / Bennink)
Play The Music Of Steve Lacy: Vol. #2
(Driff Records)
Stevens / Rutherford / Parker / Guy
One Four and Two Twos (1978/79/92)
(Emanem)
Whammies, The (Djikstra / Karayorgis / Bishop / Oliver / McBride / Bennink)
Play The Music of Steve Lacy
(Driff Records)
Parker / Schlippenbach / Guy / Lovens / Lytton
2X3=5
(Leo)
Various Artists
13 Miniatures For Albert Ayler
(RogueArt)
Parker, Evan & GGRIL (Grand Groupe Regional d'Improvisation Liberee)
Vivaces
(Tour de Bras)
Brotzmann, Peter / Steve Noble / John Edwards
The Worse The Better: Live at Cafe OTO, January 2010 [VINYL REPRESS]
(Otoroku)
Sonore
OTO
(Trost Records)
Parker, Evan / Lee / Evans
The Bleeding Edge
(psi)
Full Blast & Friends
Sketches & Ballads
(Trost Records)
Grutronic & Evan Parker
Together in Zero Space
(psi)
ISKRA 1903
Goldsmiths
(Emanem)
Mengelberg, Misha & Evan Parker
It won't be called Broken Chair
(psi)
Parker / Neal / Sorbara
At Somewhere There
(Barnyard)
Anderson, Ray / Han Bennink / Christy Doran
A B D
(hatOLOGY)
Koller, Hans with Bill Frisell
Cry, Want
(psi)
Bailey, Derek
More 74
(Incus)
Parker / Guy / Lytton + Peter Evans
Scenes in the House of Music
(Clean Feed)
ICP Orchestra
Jubilee Varia
(Hatology)
Parker, Evan & Sten Sandell
Psalms
(psi)
Parker, Evan / Leimgruber, Urs
Twine
(Clean Feed)
Parker, Evan
Whitstable Solo
(psi)
Parker, Evan
Set
(psi)
Sonore (Gustafsson / Vandermark / Brotzmann)
Only The Devil Has No Dreams
(Jazzwerkstatt)
Baker, Duck
The Ducks Palace
(Incus)
Mancini Project, The
Views of Mancini
(FMR)
Bailey, Derek
Barcelona Chronicles: All Thumbs [DVD]
(Incus)
Bailey, Derek & Agusti Fernandez
A Silent Dance
(Incus)
Moholo, Loius / Evan Parker Quintet
Bush Fire
(Ogun)
Recommended & Related Releases:

Search for other titles on the Cien Fuegos label.