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Guy, Barry / Eddie Prevost / Evan Parker / Keith Rowe: Supersession [REMASTERED, REPACKAGED, ADDITIO (Matchless)

Recorded at a concert in London, September 1984, this supersession brings AMM stalwarts Keith Rowe and Eddie Prevost together with saxophonist Evan Parker and bassist Barry Guy for an amazingly diverse and cohesive long improvisation.
 

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UPC: 5020492001724

Label: Matchless
Catalog ID: MRCD17
Squidco Product Code: 21244

Format: CD
Condition: New
Released: 2012
Country: Great Britain
Packaging: Cardboard Gatefold
Recorded at a concert given in London on September 3rd, 1984.


Personnel:

Evan Parker-soprano and tenor saxophones

Keith Rowe-guitar, electronics

Barry Guy-doublebass, electronics

Eddie Prevost-percussion

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track listing:


1. Supersession 36:56
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descriptions, reviews, &c.

"Eddie Prévost is not only a highly articulate percussionist but also a stimulating writer, writing for example his occasional contributions to The Write Place or his examnation and critical reactions to The Ganelin Trio in Wire 7. This CD release from Prévost's own label comes with a thought-provoking essay on alienation strategies in music. He contrasts these methods with the approach of the participants in this concert recording, who "do not seek to 'demonstrate' an alternative form. They are content to perform in a mode which has become the simple and natural means of musical expression."

I supose that this is 'difficult' music, but these exponents inhabit the unfamiliar places of this sound world as if they were the most natural of habitats, which for them they are. This is a hermetic environment in which the four elements interwine, merge, discourse, shape-swop and shift. It may be self-contained but it is not unwelcoming to audiences prepared to give something of themselves, to melt into passages of hushed, eery beauty, to be sucked into vortices of thunderous turbulence or to particpate, albeit vicariously through their responses and imagination, in the creation of unremembered sounds.

The rapport between the musicians and the unconventional noises they produce from their instruments challenge the listeners' powers o fidentifying and distinguishing the voices of the individual players. Enjoyable though this game is it is hardly the most fruitful approach. Details of timbres, component sound relationships, transmutations of constituent parts of the music and, flipping the telescope over, the overal effect of the tapestry matter more than individual credits.

A supersession for sure, music-making of formidable integrity (in all senses of the word) which offers seemingly infinite and inexhaustible prospects."-Barry Witherden, The Wire July 1989



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The Squid
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Artist Biographies:

"Evan Parker was born in Bristol in 1944 and began to play the saxophone at the age of 14. Initially he played alto and was an admirer of Paul Desmond; by 1960 he had switched to tenor and soprano, following the example of John Coltrane, a major influence who, he would later say, determined "my choice of everything". In 1962 he went to Birmingham University to study botany but a trip to New York, where he heard the Cecil Taylor trio (with Jimmy Lyons and Sunny Murray), prompted a change of mind. What he heard was "music of a strength and intensity to mark me for life ... l came back with my academic ambitions in tatters and a desperate dream of a life playing that kind of music - 'free jazz' they called it then."

Parker stayed in Birmingham for a time, often playing with pianist Howard Riley. In 1966 he moved to London, became a frequent visitor to the Little Theatre Club, centre of the city's emerging free jazz scene, and was soon invited by drummer John Stevens to join the innovative Spontaneous Music Ensemble which was experimenting with new kinds of group improvisation. Parker's first issued recording was SME's 1968 Karyobin, with a line-up of Parker, Stevens, Derek Bailey, Dave Holland and Kenny Wheeler. Parker remained in SME through various fluctuating line-ups - at one point it comprised a duo of Stevens and himself - but the late 1960s also saw him involved in a number of other fruitful associations.

He began a long-standing partnership with guitarist Bailey, with whom he formed the Music Improvisation Company and, in 1970, co-founded Incus Records. (Tony Oxley, in whose sextet Parker was then playing, was a third co-founder; Parker left Incus in the mid-1980s.) Another important connection was with the bassist Peter Kowald who introduced Parker to the German free jazz scene. This led to him playing on Peter Brötzmann's 1968 Machine Gun, Manfred Schoof's 1969 European Echoes and, in 1970, joining pianist Alex von Schlippenbach and percussionist Paul Lovens in the former's trio, of which he is still a member: their recordings include Pakistani Pomade, Three Nails Left, Detto Fra Di Noi, Elf Bagatellen and Physics.

Parker pursued other European links, too, playing in the Pierre Favre Quartet (with Kowald and Swiss pianist Irene Schweizer) and in the Dutch Instant Composers Pool of Misha Mengelberg and Han Bennink. The different approaches to free jazz he encountered proved both a challenging and a rewarding experience. He later recalled that the German musicians favoured a "robust, energy-based thing, not to do with delicacy or detailed listening but to do with a kind of spirit-raising, a shamanistic intensity. And l had to find a way of surviving in the heat of that atmosphere ... But after a while those contexts became more interchangeable and more people were involved in the interactions, so all kinds of hybrid musics came out, all kinds of combinations of styles."

A vital catalyst for these interactions were the large ensembles in which Parker participated in the 1970s: Schlippenbach's Globe Unity Orchestra, Chris McGregor's Brotherhood of Breath, Barry Guy's London Jazz Composers Orchestra (LJCO) and occasional big bands led by Kenny Wheeler. In the late 70s Parker also worked for a time in Wheeler's small group, recording Around Six and, in 1980, he formed his own trio with Guy and LJCO percussionist Paul Lytton (with whom he had already been working in a duo for nearly a decade). This group, together with the Schlippenbach trio, remains one of Parker's top musical priorities: their recordings include Tracks, Atlanta, Imaginary Values, Breaths and Heartbeats, The Redwood Sessions and At the Vortex. In 1980, Parker directed an Improvisers Symposium in Pisa and, in 1981, he organised a special project at London's Actual Festival. By the end of the 1980s he had played in most European countries and had made various tours to the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. ln 1990, following the death of Chris McGregor, he was instrumental in organising various tributes to the pianist and his fellow Blue Notes; these included two discs by the Dedication Orchestra, Spirits Rejoice and lxesa.

Though he has worked extensively in both large and small ensembles, Parker is perhaps best known for his solo soprano saxophone music, a singular body of work that in recent years has centred around his continuing exploration of techniques such as circular breathing, split tonguing, overblowing, multiphonics and cross-pattern fingering. These are technical devices, yet Parker's use of them is, he says, less analytical than intuitive; he has likened performing his solo work to entering a kind of trance-state. The resulting music is certainly hypnotic, an uninterrupted flow of snaky, densely-textured sound that Parker has described as "the illusion of polyphony". Many listeners have indeed found it hard to credit that one man can create such intricate, complex music in real time. Parker's first solo recordings, made in 1974, were reissued on the Saxophone Solos CD in 1995; more recent examples are Conic Sections and Process and Reality, on the latter of which he does, for the first time, experiment with multi-tracking. Heard alone on stage, few would disagree with writer Steve Lake that "There is, still, nothing else in music - jazz or otherwise - that remotely resembles an Evan Parker solo concert."

While free improvisation has been Parker's main area of activity over the last three decades, he has also found time for other musical pursuits: he has played in 'popular' contexts with Annette Peacock, Scott Walker and the Charlie Watts big band; he has performed notated pieces by Gavin Bryars, Michael Nyman and Frederic Rzewski; he has written knowledgeably about various ethnic musics in Resonance magazine. A relatively new field of interest for Parker is improvising with live electronics, a dialogue he first documented on the 1990 Hall of Mirrors CD with Walter Prati. Later experiments with electronics in the context of larger ensembles have included the Synergetics - Phonomanie III project at Ullrichsberg in 1993 and concerts by the new EP2 (Evan Parker Electronic Project) in Berlin, Nancy and at the 1995 Stockholm Electronic Music Festival where Parker's regular trio improvised with real-time electronics processed by Prati, Marco Vecchi and Phillip Wachsmann. "Each of the acoustic instrumentalists has an electronic 'shadow' who tracks him and feeds a modified version of his output back to the real-time flow of the music."

The late 80s and 90s brought Parker the chance to play with some of his early heroes. He worked with Cecil Taylor in small and large groups, played with Coltrane percussionist Rashied Ali, recorded with Paul Bley: he also played a solo set as support to Ornette Coleman when Skies of America received its UK premiere in 1988. The same period found Parker renewing his acquaintance with American colleagues such as Anthony Braxton, Steve Lacy and George Lewis, with all of whom he had played in the 1970s (often in the context of London's Company festivals). His 1993 duo concert with Braxton moved John Fordham in The Guardian to raptures over "saxophone improvisation of an intensity, virtuosity, drama and balance to tax the memory for comparison".

Parker's 50th birthday in 1994 brought celebratory concerts in several cities, including London, New York and Chicago. The London performance, featuring the Parker and Schlippenbach trios, was issued on a highly-acclaimed two-CD set, while participants at the American concerts included various old friends as well as more recent collaborators in Borah Bergman and Joe Lovano. The NYC radio station WKCR marked the occasion by playing five days of Parker recordings. 1994 also saw the publication of the Evan Parker Discography, compiled by ltalian writer Francesco Martinelli, plus chapters on Parker in books on contemporary musics by John Corbett and Graham Lock.

Parker's future plans involve exploring further possibilities in electronics and the development of his solo music. They also depend to a large degree on continuity of the trios, of the large ensembles, of his more occasional yet still long-standing associations with that pool of musicians to whose work he remains attracted. This attraction, he explained to Coda's Laurence Svirchev, is attributable to "the personal quality of an individual voice". The players to whom he is drawn "have a language which is coherent, that is, you know who the participants are. At the same time, their language is flexible enough that they can make sense of playing with each other ... l like people who can do that, who have an intensity of purpose." "

-Evan Parker Website (http://evanparker.com/biography.php)
11/15/2017

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"tabletop guitarist and painter. Rowe is a founding member of both the influential AMM in the mid-1960s (though in 2004 he quit that group for the second time) and M.I.M.E.O. Having trained as a visual artist, Rowe's paintings have been featured on most of his own albums. After years of obscurity, Rowe has achieved a level of relative notoriety, and since the late 1990s has kept up a busy recording and touring schedule. He is seen as a godfather of EAI (electroacoustic improvisation), with many of his recent recordings having been released by Erstwhile Records.

Rowe began his career playing jazz in the early 1960s-notably with Mike Westbrook and Lou Gare. His early influences were guitarists like Wes Montgomery, Charlie Christian and Barney Kessel. Eventually, however, Rowe grew tired of what he considered the form's limitations. Rowe began experimenting, slowly and gradually. An important step was a New Year's resolution to stop tuning his guitar-much to Westbrook's displeasure. Rowe gradually expanded into free jazz and free improvisation, eventually abandoning conventional guitar technique.

This change in his approach to guitar, Rowe reports, was partly inspired by a teacher in one of his painting courses who told him, "Rowe, you cannot paint a Caravaggio. Only Caravaggio can paint Caravaggio." Rowe reports that after considering this idea from a musical perspective, "trying to play guitar like Jim Hall seemed quite wrong." For several years Rowe contemplated how to reinvent his approach to the guitar, again finding inspiration in visual art, namely, American painter Jackson Pollock, who abandoned traditional painting methods to forge his own style. "How could I abandon the technique? Lay the guitar flat!"

Rowe developed various prepared guitar techniques: placing the guitar flat on a table and manipulating the strings, body and pick-ups in unorthodox ways to produce sounds described as dark, brooding, compelling, expansive and alien. He has been known to employ objects such as a library card, rubber eraser, springs, hand-held electric fans, alligator clips, and common office supplies in playing the guitar. A January 1997 feature in Guitar Player magazine described a Rowe performance as "resemble a surgeon operating on a patient." Rowe sometimes incorporates live radio broadcasts into his performances, including shortwave radio and number stations (the guitar's pick-ups will also pick up radio signals, and broadcast them through the amplifier).

AMM percussionist Eddie Prévost reports that Rowe has "an uncanny touch on the wireless switch", able to find radio broadcasts which seem to blend ideally with, or offer startling commentary on, the music. (Prévost, 18). On AMMMusic, towards the end of the cacophonous "Ailantus Glandolusa", a speaker announces via radio that "We cannot preserve the normal music." Prevost writes that during an AMM performance in Istanbul, Rowe located and integrated a radio broadcast of "the pious intonation of a male Turkish voice. AMM of course, had absolutely no idea what the material was. Later, it was complimented upon the judicious way that verses from The Koran had been introduced into the performance, and the respectful way they had been treated!" In reviewing World Turned Upside Down, critic Dan Hill writes, "Rowe has tuned his shortwave radio to some dramatically exotic gameshow and human voices spatter the mix, though at such low volume, they're unintelligible and abstracted. Rowe never overplays this device, a clear temptation with such a seductive technology - the awesome possibility of sonically reaching out across a world of voices requires experienced hands to avoid simple but ultimately short-term pleasure. This he does masterfully, mixing in random operatics and chance encounters with talkshow hosts to anchor the sound in humanity, amidst the abstraction." "

Some accounts report that Rowe's guitar technique was an influence on Pink Floyd founder Syd Barrett: "Taking his cues from experimental guitarist Keith Rowe of AMM, Barrett strived to push his music farther and farther out into the zone of complete abstraction."

Rowe has worked together with numerous composers and musicians, including Cornelius Cardew, Christian Wolff, Howard Skempton, Jeffrey Morgan, John Tilbury, Evan Parker, Taku Sugimoto, Otomo Yoshihide, Sachiko M, Oren Ambarchi, Christian Fennesz, Burkhard Beins, Kurt Liedwart, Toshimaru Nakamura, David Sylvian and Peter Rehberg.

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keith_Rowe)
11/15/2017

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Barry John Guy (born 22 April 1947, in London) is a British composer and double bass player. His range of interests encompasses early music, contemporary composition, jazz and improvisation, and he has worked with a wide variety of orchestras in the UK and Europe. He also taught at Guildhall School of Music.

Born in London, Guy came to the fore as an improvising bassist as a member of a trio with pianist Howard Riley and drummer Tony Oxley (Witherden, 1969). He also became an occasional member of John Stevens' ensembles in the 1960s and 1970s, including the Spontaneous Music Ensemble. In the early 1970s, he was a member of the influential free improvisation group Iskra 1903 with Derek Bailey and trombonist Paul Rutherford (a project revived in the late 1970s, with violinist Philipp Wachsmann replacing Bailey). He also formed a long-standing partnership with saxophonist Evan Parker, which led to a trio with drummer Paul Lytton which became one of the best-known and most widely travelled free-improvising groups of the 1980s and 1990s. He was briefly a member of the Michael Nyman Band in the 1980s, performing on the soundtrack of The Draughtsman's Contract.

Guy's interests in improvisation and formal composition received their grandest form in the London Jazz Composers Orchestra. Originally formed to perform Guy's composition Ode in 1972 (released as a 2-LP set on Incus and later, in expanded form, as a 2-CD set on Intakt), it became one of the great large-scale European improvising ensembles. Early documentation is spotty - the only other recording from its early years is Stringer (FMP, now available on Intakt paired with the later "Study II") - but beginning in the late 1980s the Swiss label Intakt set out to document the band more thoroughly. The result was a series of ambitious, album-length compositions designed to give all the players in the band maximum opportunity for expression while still preserving a rigorous sense of form: Zurich Concerts, Harmos, Double Trouble (originally written for an encounter with Alexander von Schlippenbach's Globe Unity Orchestra, though the eventual CD was just for the LJCO), Theoria (a concerto for guest pianist Irène Schweizer), Three Pieces, and Double Trouble Two. The group's activities subsided in the mid-1990s, but it was never formally disbanded, and reconvened in 2008 for a one-off concert in Switzerland. In the mid-1990s Guy also created a second, smaller ensemble, the Barry Guy New Orchestra.

Guy has also written for other large improvising ensembles, such as the NOW Orchestra and ROVA (the piece Witch Gong Game inspired by images by the visual artist Alan Davie).

His current improvising activities include piano trios with Marilyn Crispell and Agusti Fernandez. He has also recorded several albums for ECM, which often focus on the interface between improvisers and electronics, including his work in Evan Parker's Electro-Acoustic Ensemble and his own Ceremony.

Guy's session work in the pop field includes playing double bass on the song "Nightporter", from the Japan album Gentlemen Take Polaroids.

He is married to the early music violinist Maya Homburger. After spending some years in Ireland, they now live in Switzerland. They run the small label Maya, which releases a variety of records in the genres of free improvisation, baroque music and contemporary composition.

Guy's jazz work is characterised by free improvisation, using a range of unusual playing methods: bowed and pizzicato sounds beneath the bass's bridge; plucking the strings above the left hand; beating the strings with percussion instrument mallets; and "preparing" the instrument with sticks and other implements inserted between the strings and fingerboard. His improvisations are often percussive and unpredictable, inhabiting no discernible harmonic territory and pushing into unknown regions. However, they can also be melodious and tender with due regard for harmonic integration with other players, and at times he will even play with a straight jazz swing feel.

Similarly, in his concert works, Guy manages to alternate harmonic and rhythmic complexity worthy of 1960s experimentalists such as Penderecki and Stockhausen with joyous, often ecstatic, melody. Works such as "Flagwalk" for string orchestra and "Fallingwater - Concerto for Orchestra" display Guy's compositional skill in handling extended forms and writing for large instrumental groups.

Some of his compositions, such as "Witch Gong Game" for ensemble, use graphic notation in conjunction with cue cards to lead performers into playing and improvising material from numbered sections of the score.

He is also an architect."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barry_Guy)
11/15/2017

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Eddie Prévost (Edwin John) (born Hitchin, Hertfordshire, England, 22 June 1942) is an English percussionist noted for founding and participating in the AMM free improvisation group.

Of Huguenot heritage, Prévost's silk weaving ancestors moved to Spitalfields in the late 17th century. Brought up by single parent mother (Lilian Elizabeth) in war-damaged London Borough of Bermondsey. He won a state scholarship to Addey and Stanhope Grammar School, Deptford, London, where to-be drummers Trevor Tomkins and Jon Hiseman also studied. Music tuition, however, was limited to singing and general classical music appreciation. Enrolled in the Boy Scouts Association (19th Bermondsey Troop) to join marching band. As a teenager began to get involved with the emerging youth culture music; skiffle, before being introduced to a big jazz record collection of a school friend with rich parents. With a bonus from the florist, for whom Prévost worked part-time after school, purchased his first snare drum from the famed Len Hunt drum shop in Archer Street (part of London's theatre land).

After leaving school at sixteen Prévost was employed in various clerical positions whilst continuing his musical interests. Although, by now immersed in the music of bebop, his playing technique was insufficient for purpose. New Orleans style jazz ('trad') offered scope for his growing musical prowess. He played in various bands mostly in the East End of London. It was during a tenure with one of these bands he met trumpeter David Ware, who also shared a passion for the hard-bop jazz music. In their early twenties they later formed a modern jazz quintet which ultimately included Lou Gare, who had recently moved to London from Rugby and was a student at Ealing College of Art and a member of the Mike Westbrook Jazz Orchestra.

AMM was co-founded in 1965 by Lou Gare, Eddie Prévost and Keith Rowe. They were shortly joined by Lawrence Sheaff. All had a jazz background. They were, however, soon augmented by composer Cornelius Cardew. Thereafter, Cardew, Gare, Prévost and Rowe remained as basis of the ensemble until the group fractured in 1972. Other more formally trained musicians were to enter the ranks of AMM after Cardew's departure. Those to make significant contributions were cellist Rohan de Saram and, in particular, pianist John Tilbury. The latter was a friend and early associate of Cardew and later became his biographer.

In contrast to many other improvising ensembles, the core aesthetic of the ensemble is one of enquiry. There was no attempt to create a spontaneous music reflecting, or emulating, other forms. The AMM sound-world emerged from what Cardew referred to as "searching for sounds". For Prévost, the following would become the core formulation which he would explore during his subsequent musical career and explain and develop in various writings (see bibliography) and workshop activities.

We are "searching" for sounds and for the responses that attach to them, rather than thinking them up, preparing them and producing them.

In the 1980s, in response to various workshops and lectures, Prévost first formulated the twin analytical propositions of heurism and dialogue as defining concepts for an emergent musical philosophy, whilst acknowledging Cardew's construction (above). This line was explored and constantly redefined much through the London workshop experience, as his articles and his books show. (see below: The London Workshop). His 2011 book - The First Concert: an Adaptive Appraisal of a Meta Music - is described as a view "mediated through the developing critical discourse of adaptionism; a perspective grounded in Darwinian conceptions of human nature. Music herein is examined for its cognitive and generative qualities to see how our evolved biological and emergent cultural legacy reflects our needs and dreams. This survey visits ethnomusicology, folk music, jazz, contemporary music and "world music" as well as focusing upon various forms of improvisation - observing their effect upon human relations and aspirations. However, there are also analytical and ultimately positive suggestions towards future metamusical practices. These mirror and potentially meet the aspirations of a growing community who wish to engage with the world - with all its history and chance conditionals - by applying a free-will in making music that is creative and collegiate." (back cover of First Concert)History with AMM

When, in the early 1970s, Cardew and Rowe began to devote their time and energy to espousing the political doctrine of an English Maoist party a fracture occurred in the ensemble leaving the rump of Lou Gare and Eddie Prévost, who continued in a duo form making various concerts and festival appearances and leaving a legacy of two recordings. At the end of the decade a rapprochement was attempted and for a short while the quartet began playing together again. It did not last. Lou Gare departed and moved from London to Devon. While Cardew's commitment to politics made his complete withdrawal inevitable. It was during this period Prévost took an Honours Degree at Hatfield Polytechnic, exploring and developing his interests in history(especially East Asian) and philosophy. Musically, this left Rowe and Prévost playing together. Their recording for German ECM label "It had been an ordinary enough day in Pueblo, Colorado" is the single example of their duet period. By the late 1970s a reawakened association with John Tilbury was cemented into his permanent place in AMM. He is featured on all subsequent AMM performances and recordings (as is Prévost). In 2002 a more lasting schism occurred leading to Rowe departing from AMM and leaving Tilbury to continue with Prévost.Percussion

The investigative dynamic of AMM leads a musician to seek out new material. It is the fabric and constitution of stuff that is considered as more important than any historical or cultural heritage. It is Prévost's constant exploration's that has produced the range of sounds associated with his work, particularly within AMM and its extension to the many workshop ensembles. This philosophy leads to what Seymour Wright has so aptly described as the "awkward wealth" of investigation.(citation) It is a position of constant examination and artistic redress.Drumming

Drumming with AMM was principally replaced by discreet percussion work which by and large relied on sound and texture rather than rhythm. At the time of the Gare/Prévost period this position was reviewed. However, it was plain the AMM aesthetic, characteristic of the early formative period, was to have its effect. The "searching" method prevailed. And, whereas a saxophone and drums duet led to a more jazz-like expectation (amplified by Gare's reversion to a more rolling and modal post-Rollins kind of approach). Prévost's playing was noted to have acquired some unusual qualities. This lead one reviewer (Melody Maker) to remark in 1972: "His free drumming flows superbly making use of his formidable technique. It's as though there has never been an Elvin Jones or Max Roach."

Drumming however, was to take a back seat in Prévost's musical output as AMM developed and began to acquire and enhance its innovative reputation. And, apart from rare musical outings he did not commit himself, more fully, to the jazz drum kit again until 2007/08. Although, continuing to play percussion, a jazz-inflected project with Seymour Wright and Ross Lambert in an ensemble called SUM was the precursor of a period more devoted to drumming. Apart from various ad hoc ensembles, this led to various recordings including a series a CDs entitled Meetings with Remarkable Saxophonists. At date this consists of four volumes featuring Evan Parker, John Butcher, Jason Yarde and Bertrand Denzler respectively.The London workshop

Over the years Prévost has conducted many improvised music workshops. However, as a result of a seminar he conducted at The Guelph Jazz Festival, Canada in 1999, Prévost began to formulate a framework for a workshop based upon a more thorough working of AMM principles and practice. He wrote:

"I had, of course, already had long previous experience of improvisation and experimental music mostly through my participation in AMM and working closely with the composers Cornelius Cardew and Christian Wolff. From this experience I had begun a working hypothesis in my book 'No Sound is Innocent'. However, there is always more to discover. On my long flight across the Atlantic, I intuited more could be found out. Not through introspective, if rational, thought alone but, through discovery or experimentation: praxis. It can, of course, be very discomforting to watch a proposition die in practise. No theory is worth its salt unless it is fully tested. The best ideas - this experience suggests - emerge through activity. Hence, the working premise of the improvisation workshop had to be based upon an emergent set of criteria constantly tested within the cauldron of experience.

In November 1999 I made it known that a free improvisation workshop would start weekly in a room at London's Community Music Centre, near London Bridge. Originally, under the auspices of the London Musicians' Collective, [...] these premises were found and minimal lines of communication to possible interested parties were opened. The first Friday evening (not thought to be an auspicious evening of the week because people 'went out' to have a good time) duly arrived. The room was available precisely because no one ever hired it on a Friday! I waited. Edwin Prévost, The First Concert: an Adaptive Appraisal of a Meta Music, (2011) p.115/6

Since then the workshop has continued weekly. It has a strong collegiate atmosphere. Those who participate are themselves formulating and refining a programme of enquiry and empathy. The working premise is one of 'searching for sounds' (Cardew). The emphasis is upon discovery and not on presentation. It is a place to risk failure and develop an open and continuing processive relationship with the materials at hand and other people. As hoped and anticipated, Prévost's continual presence is no longer required. In his occasional absences senior colleagues (in particular Seymour Wright and Ross Lambert) more than adequately move the project along. To date there have been over five hundred people who have attended the weekly workshop in London, representing over twenty different nationalities. This activity is further augmented by occasional forums for discussion and London's Cafe OTO programmes ensembles drawn from the London workshop every month. There have also been occasional extended periods of collective workshop musical experimentation. And, in 2010 there was a residential workshop held in Mwnci Studios on the Dolwillym Estate, west Wales. (see various other texts: including Philip Clark's Wire piece)] There are now workshops based upon this general premise functioning in Hungary, Greece, Slovenia, Japan, Brazil and Mexico. Mostly started by alumni of the original workshop in London.Intermediate and experimental compositions

Cardew's 'Treatise' etc. Cardew's introduction to AMM in 1966 owes something to his search for musicians to perform his (then unfinished)193 pages long graphic score, 'Treatise'. The AMM musicians (at the time Lou Gare, Eddie Prévost, Keith Rowe and Lawrence Sheaff) seemed perfect candidates to embrace this bold work of imagination. And, with others (including later AMM member John Tilbury) all participated in the premier performance at the Commonwealth Institute on 8 April 1966 (check year!). But the initial impact of Cardew's induction into AMM was to bring a halt to his compositional aspirations. However, over the years since, AMM has had a long relationship with particular indeterminate and experimental works particularly those of Cardew - especially after his death in 1983. Most prominently 'Treatise'. Other favourites were 'Solo with Accompaniment', 'Autumn '60', Schooltime Compositions' and the text piece Cardew wrote particularly for AMM, 'The Tiger's Mind.' These pieces (which for a long time had been neglected within 'new' musical schedules), and occasionally others by Christian Wolff and John Cage, were sometimes played in conjunction with an AMM improvisation. Some concert promoters were, it seems, more interested in these pieces being played than the principal musical output of AMM. Hence, Prévost's ambivalence about the inclusion of such material in concert programmes. The creative search for primary performance material was diverted, in such works, in keeping with the demands of the notation or compositional scheme. This inevitably prevented the musician from (to use Cardew's own words) "being at the heart of the experiment". (Cardew, 'Towards an Ethic of Improvisation; CC R p. 127).Matchless Recordings and Publishing

In 1979 Prévost began the recording imprint of Matchless Recordings and Publishing. Although there had been some interest by commercial labels to take on the new improvising music of the late 1960s onwards, it proved not to be satisfactory or long-lasting. Together with a number of similar initiatives, e.g. Incus Records in Britain and ICP (?) in the Netherlands, Prévost sought to take control of their own work. In the early years this was slow and painstaking work. Some years little was produced and few small sales accrued. Gradually however, Matchless recordings began to be the documenting and disseminating base for a developing body of work. Most of the AMM output is featured on Matchless and this has diversified (more so in recent years) to include other associated artists and ensembles.[see matchlessrecordings.com] In 1995, following the same principal for internal control over the output, production and dissemination of material, the publishing imprint Copula was inaugurated. The first publication was Prevost's No Sound is Innocent. Later followed by Minute Particulars in 2004. 2006 saw the publication of Cornelius Cardew: A Reader (edited by Prévost) which was a collection of Cardew's published writings accompanied by commentaries by a number of musicians associated and inspired by Cardew. This volume was an essential companion to John Tilbury's comprehensive biography Cornelius Cardew: a life unfinished which was also published by Copula in 2008. The most recent book to appear on this imprint is Prévost's The First Concert: An Adaptive Appraisal of a Meta Music (2011).

Eddie Prévost is the cousin of the ex-docker shop-steward and left-wing political activist also named Eddie Prevost."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddie_Pr%C3%A9vost)
11/15/2017

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

Other Releases With These Artists:
Spontaneous Music Ensemble
Karyobin (1968)[2017 REISSUE]
(Emanem)
Wolff, Christian / Eddie Prevost
Uncertain Outcomes [2 CDs]
(Matchless)
Rowe, Keith / Michael Pisaro
13 Thirteen [2 CDs]
(erstwhile)
Guy, Barry
Frogs [VINYL 7-inch PICTURE DISC]
(Trost Records)
Maneri, Mat / Evan Parker / Lucian Ban
Sounding Tears
(Clean Feed)
Schlippenbach Trio (Schlippenbach / Evan Parker / Lovens)
Features
(Intakt)
Schlippenbach Trio (Schlippenbach / Evan Parker / Lovens)
Warsaw Concert
(Intakt)
Guy, Barry / Marilyn Crispell / Paul Lytton
Deep Memory
(Intakt)
Courvoisier, Sylvie / Mark Feldman / Evan Parker / Ikue Mori
Miller's Tale
(Intakt)
Braxton, Anthony
Ensemble (Victoriaville) 1988
(Les Disques Victo)
Parker, Evan / John Edwards / Steve Noble
PEN
(Dropa Disc)
Parker, Evan / John Russel / Ian Brighton / Phillip Wachsmann / Marcio Mattos / Trevor Taylor
Reunion: Live From Cafe Oto
(FMR)
Parker, Evan / Andrea Centazzo
Duets 71977
(Ictus)
Parker, Evan / Daunik Lazro / Joe McPhee
Seven Pieces. Live At Willisau 1995
(Clean Feed)
Parker, Evan / Pat Thomas / John Russell / John Edwards / Alex Ward / Alison Blunt / Benedict Taylor / David Leahy / Kay Grant
Mopomoso Tour 2013 | Making Rooms [4 CD BOX SET]
(Weekertoft)
Spontaneous Music Orchestra
Search & Reflect (1973-81) [2 CDs]
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan / Mark Nauseef / Toma Gouband
As The Wind
(psi)
Spontaneous Music Ensemble
Withdrawal (1966/7)[REISSUE]
(Emanem)
Jorge, Paulo Alexandre Improbable Trio (w/ Tom Wheatley / Eddie Prevost)
Elements
(Creative Sources)
Rowe, Keith / Martin Kuchen
The Bakery
(Mikroton Recordings)
Hawkins, Alexander / Evan Parker
Leaps in Leicester
(Clean Feed)
Parker, Evan / Seymour Wright
Tie the Stone to the Wheel
(Fataka)
Parker, Evan / Joe Morris / Nate Wooley
Ninth Square
(Clean Feed)
ISKRA 1903 (Rutherford / Bailey / Guy)
Chapter One (1970-2) [3 CDs]
(Emanem)
Russell, John (with Phil Minton, Thurston Moore, Evan Parker, &c.)
With...
(Emanem)
Frith, Fred / Evan Parker
Hello, I Must Be Going
(Les Disques Victo)
Perry, Frank
Temple Of The Ancient Magical Presence
(FMR)
Schlippenbach / Parker / Edwards / Prevost
3 Nights at Cafe Oto
(Matchless)
Parker, Evan
Monoceros
(psi)
Frith, Fred / Barry Guy
Backscatter Bright Blue
(Intakt)
Schlippenbach Trio
First Recordings
(Trost Records)
Chant, Tom / John Edwards / Eddie Prevost
All Change
(Matchless)
Parker, Evan ElectroAcoustic Septet
Seven
(Les Disques Victo)
Spontaneous Music Ensemble
Oliv & Familie (1968-9)
(Emanem)
Rowe, Keith / Alfredo Costa Monteiro / Ilia Belorukov / Kurt Liedwart
Contour
(Mikroton Recordings)
NG4 Quartet (Keith Rowe / Anthony Taillard / Emmanuel Leduc / Julien Ottavi)
A Quartet For Guitars
(Mikroton Recordings)
AMM (Tilbury / Prevost)
Place Sub. V
(Matchless)
Lexer, Sebastian / Evan Parker / Eddie Prevost
Tri-Borough Triptych
(Matchless)
Denzler, Bertrand / John Edwards / Eddie Prevost
"All-in-All [en tout en pour tout]" Meetings With Remarkable Saxophonists | Volume 4
(Matchless)
Prevost / Allum / Kanngiesser / Kasyansky / Lazaridou / Yoshikawa
Workshop Concert at Cafe Oto
(Matchless)
Yarde, Jason / Oli Hayhurst / Eddie Prevost
"All Together" - Meetings with Remarkable Saxophonists | Volume 3
(Matchless)
Yoshihide, Otomo / Sachiko M / Evan Parker / John Edwards / Tony Marsh / John Butcher
Quintet/Sextet/Duos
(Otoroku)
Parker, Evan / John Edwards / Mark Sanders
The Two Seasons
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan
The Ayes Have It
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan / Paul Rutherford / Hans Schneider / Paul Lytton
Waterloo 1985
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan / Barry Guy / Paul Lytton
At The Vortex
(Emanem)
Various Artists
The All Angels Concerts [2 CDs]
(Emanem)
Various Artists
Freedom of the City 2002 - small groups [2 CDs]
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan & Joe Mcphee
What / If / They Both Could Fly [VINYL]
(Rune Grammofon)
Parker, Evan & Joe Mcphee
What / If / They Both Could Fly
(Rune Grammofon)
Rocket Science
Evan Parker / Peter Evans / Craig Taborn / Sam Pluta
(More Is More)
McGregor, Chris' Brotherhood Of Breath
Procession - Live at Toulouse
(Ogun)
Spontaneous Music Ensemble
Challenge (1966-7)
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan / Barry Guy / Paul Lytton
Live at Maya Recordings Festival [VINYL 2 LPs]
(NoBusiness)
Parker, Evan / Barry Guy / Paul Lytton
Live at Maya Recordings Festival
(NoBusiness)
Rowe, Keith / Graham Lambkin
Making A
(erstwhile)
Spontaneous Music Ensemble
Summer 1967
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan
Lines Burnt In Light
(psi)
Parker, Evan
Hasselt
(psi)
Parker, Evan / Paul Lytton
Collective Calls (Urban)
(psi)
Bennink / Evan Parker, Han
The Grass Is Greener
(psi)
Stevens / Rutherford / Parker / Guy
One Four and Two Twos (1978/79/92)
(Emanem)
Rowe, Keith
September
(erstwhile)
AMM
Two London Concerts
(Matchless)
Butcher / Viltard / Prevost
"All But" - Meetings with Remarkable Saxophonists -- Volume 2
(Matchless)
Lexer / Prevost / Wright
Impossibility in its Purest Form
(Matchless)
Parker / Edwards / Prevost
"All Told" - Meetings with Remarkable Saxophonists -- Volume 1
(Matchless)
Parker / Schlippenbach / Guy / Lovens / Lytton
2X3=5
(Leo)
Wolff, Christian / Keith Rowe

(erstwhile)
Parker, Evan & GGRIL (Grand Groupe Regional d'Improvisation Liberee)
Vivaces
(Tour de Bras)
Weber, Katharina
Games And Improvisations
(Intakt)
Foxes Fox
Live at the Vortex
(psi)
Rowe, Keith / John Tilbury
E.E. Tension And Circumstance
(Potlatch)
Parker, Evan / Lee / Evans
The Bleeding Edge
(psi)
Various Artists
PRES Revisited. Jozef Patkowski In Memoriam
(Bolt)
Grutronic & Evan Parker
Together in Zero Space
(psi)
ISKRA 1903
Goldsmiths
(Emanem)
Mengelberg, Misha & Evan Parker
It won't be called Broken Chair
(psi)
Parker / Neal / Sorbara
At Somewhere There
(Barnyard)
Mimeo
WIGRY [2 VINYL LPs]
(Monotype)
Malfatti, Radu / Keith Rowe
"Phi" [3 CDs]
(erstwhile)
Allum & Prevost
Penumbrae
(Matchless)
Koller, Hans with Bill Frisell
Cry, Want
(psi)
Sakada
30 November 2002
(Confront)
Amalgam (Watts / Clyne / Stevens / Guy)
Prayer For Peace [VINYL]
(NoBusiness)
Parker / Guy / Lytton + Peter Evans
Scenes in the House of Music
(Clean Feed)
Parker, Evan & Sten Sandell
Psalms
(psi)
Parker, Evan / Leimgruber, Urs
Twine
(Clean Feed)
Kuchen / Rowe / Wright

(Another Timbre)
AMM
Sounding Music
(Matchless)
Parker, Evan
Whitstable Solo
(psi)
Parker, Evan
Set
(psi)
Free Jazz Quartet
Memories For The Future
(Matchless)
Rowe, Keith / Sachiko M
M-contact [2 CDs]
(erstwhile)
Parker, Evan
Saxophone Solos
(psi)
Schlippenbach, Alexander Von & Eddie Prevost
Blackheath
(Matchless)
Wright, Seymour & Eddie Prevost
Gamut
(Matchless)
AMM w/ John Butcher
Trinity
(Matchless)
Townhouse Orchestra (E.Parker/ Sandell / Flaten / Nilssen-Love)
Belle Ville
(Clean Feed)
Stevens, John / Evan Parker
Corner to Corner + The Longest Night
(Ogun)
London Improvisers Orchestra
Improvisations for George Riste
(psi)
Recommended & Related Releases:
Spontaneous Music Ensemble
Karyobin (1968)[2017 REISSUE]
(Emanem)
Wolff, Christian / Eddie Prevost
Uncertain Outcomes [2 CDs]
(Matchless)
Maneri, Mat / Evan Parker / Lucian Ban
Sounding Tears
(Clean Feed)
Schlippenbach Trio (Schlippenbach / Evan Parker / Lovens)
Features
(Intakt)
Schlippenbach Trio (Schlippenbach / Evan Parker / Lovens)
Warsaw Concert
(Intakt)
Guy, Barry / Marilyn Crispell / Paul Lytton
Deep Memory
(Intakt)
Courvoisier, Sylvie / Mark Feldman / Evan Parker / Ikue Mori
Miller's Tale
(Intakt)
Braxton, Anthony
Ensemble (Victoriaville) 1988
(Les Disques Victo)
Parker, Evan / John Edwards / Steve Noble
PEN
(Dropa Disc)
Parker, Evan / John Russel / Ian Brighton / Phillip Wachsmann / Marcio Mattos / Trevor Taylor
Reunion: Live From Cafe Oto
(FMR)
Parker, Evan / Andrea Centazzo
Duets 71977
(Ictus)
Parker, Evan / Daunik Lazro / Joe McPhee
Seven Pieces. Live At Willisau 1995
(Clean Feed)
Parker, Evan / Pat Thomas / John Russell / John Edwards / Alex Ward / Alison Blunt / Benedict Taylor / David Leahy / Kay Grant
Mopomoso Tour 2013 | Making Rooms [4 CD BOX SET]
(Weekertoft)
Spontaneous Music Orchestra
Search & Reflect (1973-81) [2 CDs]
(Emanem)
Parker, Evan / Mark Nauseef / Toma Gouband
As The Wind
(psi)
Spontaneous Music Ensemble
Withdrawal (1966/7)[REISSUE]
(Emanem)
Rowe, Keith / Martin Kuchen
The Bakery
(Mikroton Recordings)
Hawkins, Alexander / Evan Parker
Leaps in Leicester
(Clean Feed)
Parker, Evan / Seymour Wright
Tie the Stone to the Wheel
(Fataka)
Parker, Evan / Joe Morris / Nate Wooley
Ninth Square
(Clean Feed)
ISKRA 1903 (Rutherford / Bailey / Guy)
Chapter One (1970-2) [3 CDs]
(Emanem)
Russell, John (with Phil Minton, Thurston Moore, Evan Parker, &c.)
With...
(Emanem)
Frith, Fred / Evan Parker
Hello, I Must Be Going
(Les Disques Victo)
Perry, Frank
Temple Of The Ancient Magical Presence
(FMR)
Schlippenbach / Parker / Edwards / Prevost
3 Nights at Cafe Oto
(Matchless)
Frith, Fred / Barry Guy
Backscatter Bright Blue
(Intakt)

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