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Various Artists

Wandelweiser und so weiter [6 CD Box]

Various Artists: Wandelweiser und so weiter [6 CD Box] (Another Timbre)

A gorgeous 6 CD box of Wandelweiser works, compositions integtrating silence and sound from composers including John Cage, Angharad Davies, Michael Pisaro, Dominic Lash, Sam Sfirri, Antoine Beuger, Phil Durrant, &c., &c.
 

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product information:


Label: Another Timbre
Catalog ID: at56x6
Squidco Product Code: 17053

Format: 6 CDs
Condition: New
Released: 2012
Country: UK
Packaging: 6 CD Box Set
Recorded on various dates and at various locations.


Personnel:

Sam Sfirri-composer, performer

Antoine Berger-composer, performer

Manfred Werder-composer, performer

James Saunders-composer, performer

Radu Malfatti-composer, performer

John Cage-composer, performer

Pierre Borel-composer, performer

Johnny Chang-composer, performer

Derek Shirley-composer, performer

Phil Durrant-composer, performer

Michael Pisaro-composer, performer

Stefan Thut-composer, performer

Jason Brogan-composer, performer

Neil Davidson-composer, performer

Rhodri Davies-composer, performer

Jane Dickson-composer, performer

Patrick Farmer-composer, performer

Dimitra Lazaridou-Chatzigoga-composer, performer

Taylan Susam-composer, performer

Dominic Lash-composer, performer

Jurg Frey-composer, performer

Angharad Davies-composer, performer

John White-composer, performer

Anett Nemeth-composer, performer

Eva-Maria Houben

Highlight an artist name or instrument above
and click here to Search
track listing:


DISC 1: Confluences

1-1 Sam Sfirri – Natural At Last - Realisation #1 7:51

1-2 Antoine Beuger – Lieux De Passage 26:16

1-3 Manfred Werder – 2011(4) 9:43

1-4 Sam Sfirri – Natural At Last - Realisation #2 4:45

1-5 James Saunders (3) – Various Distinct Spatial Or Temporal Locations 1:48

1-6 Radu Malfatti – Heikou 27:46

DISC 2: Crosscurrents

2-1 Sam Sfirri – The Undulating Land 5:12

2-2 John Cage – Three2 9:14

2-3 Pierre Borel / Johnny Chang / Derek Shirley – Etchings 20:28

2-4 Phil Durrant – Sowari For Ensemble 12:35

2-5 Michael Pisaro – Fields Have Ears (3b) 30:29

DISC 3: Drifts

3-1 Antoine Beuger – 'T' aus "Etwas (Lied)' 9:12

3-2 Stefan Thut – Vier, 1-12 21:14

3-3 Jason Brogan – Ensemble 9:14

3-4 James Saunders (3) – With The Same Material Or Still, To Vary The Material 8:54

3-5 Manfred Werder – Zwei Ausführende (Seiten 357-360)

DISC 4: Eddies

4-1 Stefan Thut – Many, 1-4 5:02

4-2 Neil Davidson, Rhodri Davies, Jane Dickson, Patrick Farmer, Dimitra Lazaridou-Chatzigoga – Improvisation #08.01.12 16:25

4-3 Sam Sfirri – For The Choice Of Directions - Realisation #1 9:21

4-4 Taylan Susam – For Maalke Schoorel 5:48

4-5 Dominic Lash – For Five 12:10

4-6 Jürg Frey – Time Intent Memory 25:58

4-7 Sam Sfirri – For The Choice Of Directions - Realisation #2 5:01

DISC 5: Undertows

5-1 Jürg Frey – Circular Music No.2 14:44

5-2 Manfred Werder – 2008(6) 4:56

5-3 Jürg Frey – Un Champ De Tendresse Parsemé D'Adieux (4) 19:58

5-4 Taylan Susam – For Sessh T y 11:34

5-5 Michael Pisaro – Descending Series (1) 28:39

DISC 6: Upwellings

6-1 John Cage – Prelude For Meditation 1:13

6-2 Sam Sfirri – Little By Little - Realisation #1 9:55

6-3 Angharad Davies – Cofnod Pen Bore / Morning Records 9:10

6-4 Sam Sfirri – Natural At Last - Realisation #3 9:00

6-5 Sam Sfirri – Little By Little - Realisation #2 7:47

6-6 John White – Drinking And Hooting Machine 8:09

6-7 Sam Sfirri – Little By Little - Realisation #3 6:58

6-8 Anett Németh – Eine Unbedeutende Aussage 7:18

6-9 Eva-Maria Houben – Von Da Nach Da 19:41




Related Categories of Interest:


Compositional Forms
Avant-Garde
Improvised Music
Electro-Acoustic
Box Sets
John Cage
Staff Picks & Recommended Items
Electroacoustic Composition

sample the album:








descriptions, reviews, &c.

"'Wandelweiser und so weiter' is a 6-CD box set with 8 hours of music by a wide range of composers in or around the Wandelweiser collective. The box brings together previously unissued works by the most well-known composers in the Wandelweiser collective (Michael Pisaro, Antoine Beuger, Radu Malfatti and Manfred Werder), pieces by other Wandelweiser composers (Johnny Chang, Sam Sfirri, Eva-Maria Houben, Stefan Thut, Taylan Susam), as well as music by other composers whose work relates to Wandelweiser in some way, such as James Saunders, Dominic Lash, Anett Németh and John Cage. A central focus of the collection is the way in which Wandelweiser music has in recent years come together with the 'post-reductionist' strand within improvisation. Many of the pieces on the box set are realisations of Wandelweiser scores by musicians who are better known as improvisers, but who have recently been drawn to the soundworld of Wandelweiser.

All the tracks on the box set are new recordings played by different groupings of over 50 musicians including Angharad Davies, Radu Malfatti, Lee Patterson, Jűrg Frey, Philip Thomas, Patrick Farmer, Rhodri Davies, Phil Durrant, Sarah Hughes, Dominic Lash, Anton Lukoszevieze, Tim Parkinson and many more."-Another Timbre






Sleeve Notes and Roundtable discussion regarding the Wandelweiser box.

"Wandelweiser Sound

Wandelwesier und so weiter translates as 'Wandelweiser and so on'. The and so on is important, as this box set doesn't aim to be a comprehensive anthology of Wandelweiser music, that function being already fulfilled by the catalogue of the Wandelweiser label itself.(1) While offering new realisations of pieces by the most well-known composers in the Wandelweiser collective, Wandelweiser und so weiter focuses also and in particular on the edges of what is already a marginal music: lesser known composers at or beyond the fringes of the collective, other musicians whose work has co-existed with or retrospectively prefigured something of what Wandelweiser is about, and - above all - the confluence of Wandelweiser music with the soundworld of textural improvisation through realisations by a number of musicians who are better known as improvisers, but who in recent years have been drawn to - and have in turn affected the development of - Wandelweiser music.

So Wandelweiser und so weiter presents a reading of Wandelweiser, one perspective on a music that is in flux, moving and changing in subtle ways, as if caught in the pull and ebb of a littoral sea.

sound [noun] - a narrow passage of water between the mainland and an island,

or between two larger bodies of water

I used to envisage contemporary music as a complex river system, flowing in a myriad of channels that divide and reunite, sometimes combining with tributaries, sometimes disappearing underground, or flowing into stagnant backwaters. But with Wandelweiser I prefer the image of a sound: a body of water that can be more or less defined by what surrounds it, but which doesn't move in a single, linear direction; which appears almost static, but is constantly shifting and reconfiguring itself. I especially like the idea of Wandelweiser as a 'passage of water...between two larger bodies of water', something without precisely defined boundaries that takes from and gives back to the expanses around it in a process of ongoing exchange.

Simon Reynell (producer) - September 2012

(1) the catalogue of the Wandelweiser label can be found here

For an excellent brief history of the collective, see Michael Pisaro's essay here

Roundtable discussion

The following discussion took place by email over the summer of 2012. The participants were the musicians Antoine Beuger, Dominic Lash, Michael Pisaro and Philip Thomas, and the producer Simon Reynell.

Simon Reynell: In my opinion the coming together of Wandelweiser music with (for want of a better phrase) 'post-reductionist' improvisation is producing some of the most interesting music around. Michael and Antoine, can you describe the ways in which the confluence of these two traditions has affected and changed your practice over the past five years or so?

Michael Pisaro: To be honest, I'm not sure if it has changed my practice as a composer. I feel that the openings in our music that allowed for this confluence you mention were more or less in place before the period of working with people from the improvised music sphere - other than Radu (Malfatti) - started to happen (even when, as has recently been the case, I've been asked by people such as Dominic, Rhodri Davies, Patrick Farmer, Sarah Hughes, and so on for pieces). fields have ears (4), written for Patrick and Sarah for example, makes use of a kind of indeterminacy that can be found in several of my older pieces (the way it is applied is different, but this has to do more with the concept of the "field" than anything else).

But what has definitely changed is the range of things that can happen in a performance of one of these scores (new or old). A performance of a harmony series piece today might draw on a whole set of sonic resources I hadn't specifically considered when I wrote the piece. The range of sounds in fields have ears 3b (in the recorded performance by Dominic, Patrick, Sarah, Dan Jones and Angharad Davies) is pretty astounding, to my ears. Something like this is also audible in recent performances and recordings of work by Antoine. I love this development.

Most decisively for me, is that the world in which I see our work (i.e. Wandelweiser) has definitely changed, and this interaction between the different traditions is a big part of that. I like your image of the "sound" (especially as a way of describing the often hard-to-parse internal changes in the music). But I also like Antoine's image of the "flock"; I'm thinking of those fantastic shapes created by moving swarms of birds that seem to operate as if "controlled" by one, but actually are the result of an emergent process. In any case, the shapes traced by this particular flock at the moment, with so many more people involved, are much wilder than anything I would have expected 15 years ago.

Antoine Beuger: I agree with Michael that the confluence happened more or less naturally, or fluently: people involved in certain forms of improvised music and we somehow discovered affinities in our ways of approaching music and, especially, silence. Hard to trace it back, but I have the impression that Radu's position in between these two musical worlds initiated this. Through Radu people like Taku Sugimoto and, I assume, also many younger improvisers from the UK, discovered us, and vice versa.

To me it was kind of a surprise to see this happen. I was very moved by the genuine interest that these people had in what we were doing, an interest based on really deep musical and human affinity. This hadn't happened to us before and it somehow liberated us from our relative isolation at the periphery of the world of (new) music.

Personally I have always been convinced that music only comes into existence when it is played, and that, consequently, it is the musicians, the players, who make the music, not the composers. And to me the most important question, when working on a piece, is: how is it, how does it feel, to be part of this for a (the) player(s), what happens to them? If the piece doesn't allow the players to have a deep musical experience while playing it, it doesn't make any sense. On the other hand, a deep musical experience for the players will immediately convey itself to the listeners, so the music will become a "shared experience" (as in James Tenney's definition of experimental music).

I think it is on this level that Wandelweiser and certain currents in improvised music meet. And it is easily the most inspiring meeting that has occurred to us.

Dominic Lash: I can say a little about my experience coming from the other direction, as it were - that is, starting from the position of being an improviser. It is true that for me, as Antoine suggests, Radu was the initiating figure, and for a while he was the only musician involved with Wandelweiser that I knew anything about. But as time passed and I learned more, it was to a large extent the difference from improvisation and the connection with other traditions of new music that attracted me. I would guess that Rhodri's position may have been very different, but he was an important part of the improvising scene during the development of 'reductionist' approaches, while I only began playing seriously once that process - or at least its initial stages - were largely completed. I articulated something of my current feelings about this in the interview about Droplets that is on the Another Timbre website.

That being said, some of my more recent experiences with this music have contained revelations about the possibilities of putting an improvising sensibility to work in these contexts. I am thinking of two pieces I participated in at the Amplify 11: Stones and Gravity Wave festivals in New York last September. Rehearsing Michael's A cloud drifting over the plain with Michael, Greg Stuart and Barry Chabala was fascinating because during the rehearsal Michael removed many of the specific restrictions on us as performers. The music started to breathe more, and we were able to inhabit the world of the piece more fully than when we had had more detailed guidance. Also, while thinking about Antoine's s'approcher s'éloigner s'absenter, which was written for and performed by myself, Barry and Ben Owen (and is a score consisting only of indications to play sounds either similar to or different from sounds you have heard or played previously) I suddenly had the feeling that the piece was written very much with improvisers in mind. I don't know how true that is, Antoine, but while performing it I had the feeling that I was fully occupied with performing a composed piece of music while also drawing on all the resources I have as an improviser. There was almost no tension at all between these two aspects - something I had never felt in quite such a way before.

Philip Thomas: What is so fascinating about this confluence is that it is so rare that performers from improvisation and composed backgrounds, and both, find common ground without egos and agendas getting in the way. The engagement between musicians/artists from all kinds of backgrounds feels entirely organic and natural and is something to really celebrate. I would say also that it has heightened the need for composers to devise structures and contexts for performance that are clearly differentiated from contexts for improvisation. Of course all performance is improvisation, but if there is a score of some kind, it needs to do something, or enable something to occur, which is distinct from the particular challenges of improvisation contexts. I enjoy so much your interview, Antoine, in James Saunders' book, when you discuss the particular dynamics of duo performance, as distinct from solo, or trio performance. And it makes me wonder also about the differences in dynamic, for players and audience, between two performers engaged in a focused improvisation performance and two performers engaged in a score-based piece, such as Antoine's un lieu pour être deux, or Michael's Ample (from the Harmony Series). I'd be interested to know your thoughts...

Michael Pisaro: I'm going to just to try to answer your complex question, Philip. I'd say that there might not be any obvious difference for the audience, especially if they don't really know what the score looks like. But there is in my experience a difference for the performer (which does in the end have an impact on what one hears/what happens).

Even restrained scores such as the two you mention provide a structure - or what I would better describe as a set of limits. In some ways the scores are less limited than traditional ones (i.e. with staff notation). But we have to acknowledge that one decides to play a piece (as opposed to improvise) for a reason: that is, that one wants to adopt a point of view that is given by someone else/something else. For me there's no escaping the "conceptual object" of a score, its reason for being. I feel that the best scores have a clear, one-of-a-kind conceptual object. And as a performer of a piece, that is exactly what I want to encounter.

The situation in improvisation is for me quite different. In a duo, you really never know what your partner will do. There's a palpable sense that at each moment the direction can change, and that this change depends not on a set of limits given by a score, but on the contingencies of that situation: the place, the audience, and so on, but especially on the decisions of the two performers (which often remind me of a game of chess - or a Markov chain). In any case, there is no conceptual object other than the duo itself.

Radu and I once did two evenings back-to-back in Munich that were very revealing (for me at least). On the first night we performed duos each of us had written and on the second night we improvised. The scores were of course quite open, but I always had the sense of "playing something," this sort of spirit of a score hovering over the music. On the second night we had had the experience of playing the scores of the previous night (and so kind of picked up where we left off), but I truly had the sense of "playing nothing." This must be hard to achieve: I've played in several improvised duos and other combos, but always felt a slight drag on the situation, as if we wanted to achieve something. With Radu this sense disappeared completely, and then I realized: "This is the reason people improvise!"

Simon Reynell: This leads to another question I was going to ask about valid and invalid realisations of scores. On the Wandelweiser und so weiter discs there are a number of realisations by musicians from an improvising background of very open text scores, and in particular in the case of some Sam Sfirri pieces, there are two or more very different realisations of the same score, sometimes sounding quite unlike performances of the pieces that Sam himself has been involved in. So I'd be interested to hear your thoughts as composers, performers and improvisers on the question of whether some realisations of open scores can be deemed invalid, and whether interpreters need to do more than simply respond to the score itself and take account of the wider context of its production?

Michael Pisaro: I'll step a bit around this question to say that, that for me any score ought to put into question the idea of authority. I much prefer performances of (traditional) classical music where I feel the performer him/herself puts something at stake (or something more at least than just following the instructions).

I think that "being faithful" to a score means that one finds the things in It that are genuinely relevant to one's own concerns as a musician (even if, as can be the case, one discovers those concerns in the score one is performing). So for me our music is really no different in this sense than any other music with instructions/notes/changes, etc., in that the real question is "Why am I doing this?" If I feel that performers have undergone this kind of questioning, I'm happy - and I've often had the experience of learning to enjoy something that didn't sound like what I expected, even more than the things that did sound like what I expected.

Dominic Lash: Michael expresses what I feel about this very clearly - I don't think the issue here is different in any fundamental way from any music involving a text (in the widest sense). Brian Ferneyhough has written that "the criteria for aesthetically adequate performances lie in the extent to which the performer is technically and spiritually able to recognize and embody the demands of fidelity (NOT 'exactitude'!)", and I would wholeheartedly go along with that.

On the other hand, Lionel Salter answered Derek Bailey's question as to whether a performance of baroque music could ever be remarkable because of a performer's contribution rather than for the composer's music with the reply that this "would be an absolute artistic crime" - which is very precisely what I do not believe.

Antoine Beuger: I fully agree with Michael. The musicians and their concerns are central to any musical experience. They are playing music and not just "performing a score", i.e. they are doing things they seriously intend to do (based on their inner motivation), not just things they are told to do.

Scores are there as a means of communication between a composer, who has a musical idea and a (group of) player(s) willing to be engaged in it. I like to refer to scores as "confidential letters" between friends, that is: as functioning within a situation.

"Having a musical idea" means: imagining a situation that it might be fulfilling for (a) musician(s) to be engaged in. This implies that, in my opinion, the players should be a composer's first concern.

I would much rather invert the question of validity as pertaining not to performances but to the scores themselves: is this score a "valid" (thoughtful, promising, engaging, touching etc.) communication, faithful to the players. In other words: is this score really about music, about a "deep" musical experience, that is rewarding for players (and consequently: listeners) to engage in?

Philip Thomas: Yes, I also agree with all the previous responses. I think the composers to whose music I find myself most attracted are those who are innately curious as to the outcome. This is true of Christian Wolff particularly, and I like that his music, which in many ways is on the surface very un-Wandelweiser-ish (! - there's a term to take issue with!), is performed and recorded by Wandelweiser composers/performers and associates. The recording of his Exercise 15 on the Wandelweiser label is nothing like what one might imagine from the score but Wolff seems to be very happy, if surprised, by the recording. And so with the pieces on Wandelweiser und so weiter, I feel that the strongest are always those which act as a catalyst for surprise. I've felt this time and again when playing pieces by many of these composers, that something happens (very often many things happen) that I could not have predicted, that take me aback and make me feel so very alive in the act of performance. Of course, as Michael says, this is something that should happen in the performance of all music, but I think the attitude of renewed listening, of starting afresh with each new performing situation, makes one more alert and open to the vibrancy of each moment. This in turn leads to, or rather is expressive of, something like joy.

As for the notion of a performance which is 'invalid', I would like to argue that a performance which deliberately/consciously contravenes any instructions provided (no matter how minimal) is a misrepresentation of the piece. This is about the process and engagement with the score, and nothing to do with the sounds being produced. However, misunderstandings happen, we forget 'rules' and parameters, we may choose for a reason that seemed justified in the performance to ignore an instruction, etc. And so to return to Michael's point, if the performers are engaging with the music (the ideas, not the notes) - i.e. there is, as Wolff would say, 'goodwill' - then an engaging performance is likely to result.

Simon Reynell: Another question I've been mulling is this: is there an 'after Wandelweiser'? Almost all the composers who join the collective seem to stay, even if their music moves in rather different directions (the annoying stereotype that 'it all sounds the same' is even less true than usual in this case). Will Wandelweiser continue to ripple out into wider and increasingly diverse waters? Or does it have a particular focal point arising from engagement with a particular moment historically in the evolution of contemporary music? And what might 'after Wandelweiser' look like?

Michael Pisaro: That's a very interesting question. At the risk of sounding pretentious, I'm going to answer it this way, using the terminology of Alain Badiou: Wandelweiser is not a style, it's an event. That is, Antoine, and then in short order Jürg (Frey) and Kunsu (Shim) discovered a potential for truth about the contemporary musical situation in the period from 1990 to 1992 or so. (I think, by the way, that discovered is the right word, because something like this is not created - it's only the music in the wake of the event that is created.) Perhaps it (i.e., the event) had to do with silence, but maybe that is just a shorthand for what they found. An event is evanescent, no one can pinpoint exactly where or what it is, we only have its traces. It is these traces that we (myself and the rest of the initial group) came into contact with not long thereafter, in the form of the scores, the recordings and of course the musicians themselves. That's clearly still happening with other and younger musicians. But in a sense that puts all of us (Antoine, Jürg and Kunsu included) in an "after Wandelweiser" situation. I think this means that each of us, including by now several performers, improvisers, artists and so on, is in our own way trying to be true to this event, to unpack and explore the potentials of it and the implications of it. Since the event is multiple, and we are a very heterogeneous group (in terms of our language and musical background, amongst other things), we have developed (and continue to develop) quite diverse means of exploring these pathways, of testing whether there is still "truth" to be found in it. Sometimes our findings are in conflict: something I might have come believe about the situation, might appear to be untrue or of negligible importance to someone else (and vice versa). Or what one person is doing just might not sound or feel good (or right) to another. With the heterogeneity of people (and experiences) involved, I think that this is natural; but that doesn't mean the differences can be easily resolved (or in some cases, resolved at all).

Of course this is subjective. I cannot prove that an event occurred, let alone that it should be important for people who do not see anything there. I'm also not saying that this is the only possible candidate for an event of that time or the only way of seeing this particular event. I can only believe it happened and hope to act (i.e., make music) in a way that reflects that belief. I think that I will spend the rest of my life trying to follow the implications of what happened, which I imagine is the case for (most of) the rest.

I remain deeply grateful to these gentlemen for exposing me to the Wandelweiser possibility, and to everyone else for expanding so immensely its potentials (and this applies every bit as much to the younger musicians coming along now as to my old friends). I also hope we remain good friends too. On that end, I hope to never see an "after Wandelweiser."

Dominic Lash: Anthony Braxton likes to talk about the "post-Cage continuum", the "post-Ayler continuum" and so forth. I like the way this both emphasises historically situated change (the "post-" bit) and continuity, inspiration, development (the "continuum" bit) - Braxton would refer to the the "post-Cage continuum" while Cage was very much still alive and working! Perhaps in that sense we are all operating in the "post-Wandelweiser continuum"?

Philip Thomas: I very much hope that the influence of Wandelweiser will yield surprising and diverse ways of approaching, playing and composing music. That in some ways it acts as a catalyst, as a point of reference, rather than a 'model' as such, or a kind of template. Just as Feldman's music is not about 'quiet-ness' (I think that the quietness of most of Feldman's music is a by-product of his concern for sound, space and time, and the quasi-physicality of those elements, and people who simply characterise is as being soft are missing the point) so I think that the shared but also disparate concerns of the Wandelweiser-associated artists will be the shaping force upon much future music-making. The influence of Wandelweiser may for some simply be in an acknowledgement of its significance rather than any direct correlation with the resultant sound (just as acknowledging, rather than ridiculing, Cage's influence is sufficient distinction from the musical mainstream). Playing music by both of you, Michael and Antoine, along with Manfred, Jűrg, and others, has opened my eyes and ears - my experience - to the world, to a physical reality which brings into equal focus the sounds I produce as a player and the quality of the environments in which I live, work and play. I suspect this is true of many many other listeners and players and that impact changes everything."


Artist Biographies:

"Radu Malfatti is an Austrian trombone player and composer. He was born in Innsbruck, in the province of Tyrol, on December 16, 1943. He has been described as "among the leaders in redefining the avant-garde as truly on-the-edge art." His work "since the early nineties... has been investigating the edges of ultraminimalism in both his composed and improvised work." He also operates B-Boim, a CD-R only record label focusing on improvised and composed music, much of it his own."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radu_Malfatti)
9/18/2017

"John Milton Cage Jr. (September 5, 1912 - August 12, 1992) was an American composer, music theorist, writer, philosopher, and artist. A pioneer of indeterminacy in music, electroacoustic music, and non-standard use of musical instruments, Cage was one of the leading figures of the post-war avant-garde. Critics have lauded him as one of the most influential American composers of the 20th century. He was also instrumental in the development of modern dance, mostly through his association with choreographer Merce Cunningham, who was also Cage's romantic partner for most of their lives.

Cage is perhaps best known for his 1952 composition 4′33″, which is performed in the absence of deliberate sound; musicians who present the work do nothing aside from being present for the duration specified by the title. The content of the composition is not "four minutes and 33 seconds of silence," as is often assumed, but rather the sounds of the environment heard by the audience during performance. The work's challenge to assumed definitions about musicianship and musical experience made it a popular and controversial topic both in musicology and the broader aesthetics of art and performance. Cage was also a pioneer of the prepared piano (a piano with its sound altered by objects placed between or on its strings or hammers), for which he wrote numerous dance-related works and a few concert pieces. The best known of these is Sonatas and Interludes (1946-48).

His teachers included Henry Cowell (1933) and Arnold Schoenberg (1933-35), both known for their radical innovations in music, but Cage's major influences lay in various East and South Asian cultures. Through his studies of Indian philosophy and Zen Buddhism in the late 1940s, Cage came to the idea of aleatoric or chance-controlled music, which he started composing in 1951. The I Ching, an ancient Chinese classic text on changing events, became Cage's standard composition tool for the rest of his life. In a 1957 lecture, Experimental Music, he described music as "a purposeless play" which is "an affirmation of life - not an attempt to bring order out of chaos nor to suggest improvements in creation, but simply a way of waking up to the very life we're living"."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cage)
9/18/2017

"Berlin-based composer-performer Johnny Chang engages in extended explorations surrounding the relationships of sound/silence and the in-between areas of improvisation, composition, performance and listening. Current collaborations/projects include: Antoine Beuger, Alessandro Bossetti, Lucio Capece, Olivier Di Placido, Jürg Frey, Chris Heenan, Christian Kesten, Annette Krebs, Luke Munn, Koen Nutters, Michael Pisaro, Derek Shirley."

-Johnny Chang Website (https://johnnychchang.wordpress.com/)
9/18/2017

"Phil Durrant. Born 1957; software synth/sampler, live electronics and acoustic violin.

Phil Durrant studied classical violin and piano at the London College Of Music. Since 1977 he has been a freelance musician, improviser and composer. He has performed at festivals all over Europe, U.S.A and Canada and has had his music broadcast on radio and television in many countries.

Current electronic projects include Ticklish, Secret Measures (with John Butcher), Lunge (with Gail Brand, Pat Thomas and Mark Sanders) and the international electronic orchestra, Mimeo. He also plays violin in Assumed Possibilities (with Chris Burn, Rhodri Davies and Mark Wastell), "Beinhaltung", a trio with Radu Malfatti and Thomas Lehn another trio with Berlin musicians, Burkhard Beins and Ignaz Schick, and the string quartet Quatuor Accorde, with Tony Wren, Charlotte Hug and Mark Wastell. Durrant has also played in the very influential trio with John Butcher and John Russell, as well as the Chris Burn Ensemble.

During his career he has played with many creative and important musicians, including: Derek Bailey, Evan Parker, Grooverider, Shut up and Dance, John Zorn, Phil Minton, and Tom Cora. He has also been awarded various Arts Council grants to research and develop his use of electronics. Two current duo projects - at early 2001 - were: Durrant, violin and software synth/sampler with Wade Matthews, bass clarinet, alto flute; and Durrant software synth/sampler with Mark Sanders drums and sequenced samples.

Phil Durrant has also been collaborating and composing music for a wide variety of choreographers. These include PLastic chill, In the face of a stranger and Deja deux with Maxine Doyle; Salome, Concrete and On stage with Susanne Thomas; Partial site, near view and Delay for five with Gill Clarke; Future perfekt with Ana Sanchez-Colberg; and Borderlander and Home zone with Sophia Lycouris. Salome, Concrete and Partial site, near view were site-specific and involved speaker systems in a number of different rooms. He recently wrote the music for a new play by Nick Sutton called Home movies."

-European Free Improv (EFI) (http://www.efi.group.shef.ac.uk/musician/mdurrant.html)
9/18/2017

"Michael Pisaro was born in Buffalo in 1961. He is a composer and guitarist, a member of the Wandelweiser Composers Ensemble and founder and director of the Experimental Music Workshop, Calarts. His work is frequently performed in the U.S. and in Europe, in music festivals and in many smaller venues. It has been selected twice by the ISCM jury for performance at World Music Days festivals (Copenhagen,1996; Manchester, 1998) and has also been part of festivals in Hong Kong (ICMC, 1998), Vienna (Wien Modern,1997), Aspen (1991), London (Cutting Edge, 2007), Glasgow (INSTAL 2009), Huddersfield (2009), Chicago (New Music Chicago, 1990, 1991) and elsewhere.

He has had extended composer residencies in Germany (Künstlerhof Schreyahn, Dortmund University), Switzerland (Forumclaque/Baden), Israel (Miskenot Sha'ananmim), Greece (EarTalk) and in the U.S. (Birch Creek Music Festival, Wisconsin). Concert length portraits of his music have been given in Munich, Jerusalem, Los Angeles, Vienna, Merano (Italy), Brussels, New York, Curitiba (Brazil), Amsterdam, London, Tokyo, Austin, Berlin, Chicago, Düsseldorf, Zürich, Cologne, Aarau (Switzerland), and elsewhere.

He is a Foundation for Contemporary Arts, 2005 and 2006 Grant Recipient. Much of his music of the last several years is published by Edition Wandelweiser (Germany). Several CDs of his work have been released by such labels as Edition Wandelweiser Records, Compost and Height, confront, Another Timbre, Cathnor, Nine Winds and others, including most recently "transparent city, volumes 1-4", "an unrhymed chord", "hearing metal 1", "A Wave and Waves" and "harmony series (11-16)".

His translation of poetry by Oswald Egger ("Room of Rumor") was published in 2004 by Green Integer. He is Co-Chair of Music Composition at the California Institute of the Arts near Los Angeles. He has performed many of his own works and those of close associates Antoine Beuger, Kunsu Shim, Jürg Frey and Manfred Werder, and works from the experimental tradition, especially John Cage, Christian Wolff, James Tenney and George Brecht."

-Edition Wandelweiser (http://www.wandelweiser.de/michael-pisaro.html)
9/18/2017

"Composer and cellist. Born 1968, resident in Solothurn (CH). Trained at the Lucerne Conservatory and at Boston University School of Music.

Most of his scores are to be rendered by performers; some scores serve as a template in field recording and sound art. In his compositions he operates with relatively determined open systems. Scores were realized at the Kunstraum Düsseldorf (2007), at Kid Ailack Concert Hall, Tokio (2007/09) and at the Diapason Gallery, New York (2010) among other locations. As interpreter he has premiered solo-pieces by Jürg Frey, Radu Malfatti, Tim Parkinson, James Saunders, Taku Sugimoto, Taku Unami and Manfred Werder and he has performed with the ensemble incidental music in Berlin, Brussels, London and Zurich."

-Edition Wandelweiser (http://www.wandelweiser.de/stefan-thut.html)
9/18/2017

"Rhodri Davies was born in 1971 in Aberystwyth, Wales and now lives in Gateshead in the northeast of England.

He plays harp, electric harp, live-electronics and builds wind, water, ice and fire harp installations. He has released four solo albums: Trem, Over Shadows, Wound Response and An Air Swept Clean of All Distance.

His regular groups include: a duo with John Butcher, Common Objects, HEN OGLEDD: Dawson - Davies, a trio with David Toop and Lee Patterson, Cranc, The Sealed Knot and a trio with John Tilbury and Michael Duch.

In 2008 he collaborated with the visual artist Gustav Metzger on 'Self-cancellation', a large-scale audio-visual collaboration in London and Glasgow.

New pieces for solo harp have been composed for him by: Eliane Radigue, Phill Niblock, Christian Wolff, Ben Patterson, Alison Knowles, Mieko Shiomi and Yasunao Tone.

In 2012 he was the recipient of the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, Grants to Artists Award."

-Rhodri Davies Website (http://www.rhodridavies.com/words/)
9/18/2017

"Jane Dickson is a Glasgow based composer and pianist. Her background includes classical piano and conducting, live electronics performance and composition and free improvisation using extended techniques. Her interest in live electronics lies in the subtle augmentation of acoustic instruments and voice, playing with subverting and dislocating expectation and perception. She has completed commissions from members of the London Symphony Orchestra and BBC Radio 4 and performed and had her work performed across Europe including national radio and television broadcasts in Austria, Spain and the UK. Her recent collaborative releases include Wandelweiser und so weiter (another timbre) and Accidents of Matter or of Space (SUPPEDANEUM). Her current research explores virtuosity and gender in contemporary performance and alternative methods of notation, and heavily informs her creative practice. She is a member of international group n s m b l and has premiered two works by Jakob Ullmann: son imaginaire III (HCMF ʻ13) and solo V (Courtisane ʼ15). Recent awards include PRS Women Make Music (for How to Make Two Outfits Out of One, Battersea Arts Centre) and Creative Scotland Artists Bursary for Composition, both for the creation of new and experimental opera."

-Q-O2 (http://www.q-o2.be/en/artist/jane-dickson/)
9/18/2017

"Patrick Farmer (b.1983) is a musician and sound artist working within improvisation and composition. Commonly referred to as a percussionist, Farmer will often enlist the help of a drum or turntable to act as a resonator for natural materials or filtering field recordings. He has performed throughout Europe and America, including concerts at the ICA, Stockholm National Gallery, and The Radiator Festival. He has recently spent time as artist in residence at Q-O2 in Belgium and MOKS in Estonia, with a forthcoming residency at Soundfjord, London."

-Sounds of Europe (http://www.soundsofeurope.eu/artist/patrick-farmer/)
9/18/2017

Dimitra Lazaridou-Chatzigoga is a zither player and free improviser, born in 1981 in Thessaloniki, Macedonia, Greece and curently living in London. Dimitra is a member of Ap'strophe, and has recorded with Angharad Davies, Tisha Mukarji, Johnny Chang, Jamie Drouin, Dominic Lash, David Ryan, Chris Heenan, and is heard on the "Wandelweiser und so weiter" album.

-Squidco 9/18/2017

"Born Cambridge, England, in January 1980; played bass guitar since 1994; studied with Hugh Boyd and Pascha Milner and at Basstech (London) with Rob Burns, Terry Gregory and others. Played double bass since 2001; basically self taught, with grateful thanks to Simon H. Fell. First class BA in English Literature from Oxford University (2002). Received MA Composition from Oxford Brookes University in 2003, having studied with Paul Whitty, Ray Lee and others. Received PhD from Brunel University in 2010, having studied the work of Derek Bailey, Helmut Lachenmann and JH Prynne and been supervised by Richard Barrett and John Croft."

-Dominic Lash Website (http://dominiclash.blogspot.com/p/dominic-lash_5.html)
9/18/2017

"Jürg Frey was born in 1953 in Aarau, Switzerland. Following his musical education at the Concervatoire de Musique de Genève, he turned to a career as a clarinetist, but his activities as composer soon came to the foreground. Frey developed his own language as a composer and sound artist with the creation of wide, quiet sound spaces. His work is marked by an elementary non-extravagence of sound, a sensibilty for the qualities of the material, and precision of compositional approach. His compositions sometimes bypass instrumentation and duration altogether and touch on aspects of sound art. He has worked with compositional series, as well as with language and text. Some of these activities appear in small editions or as artist's books as individual items and small editions (Edition Howeg, Zurich; weiss kunstbewegung, Berlin; complice, Berlin). His music and recordings are published by Edition Wandelweiser. Frey has been invited to workshops as visiting composer and for composer portraits at the Universität der Künste Berlin, the Universität Dortmund and several times at Northwestern University and CalArts. Some of the other places his work has developed are the concerts at the Kunstraum Düsseldorf, the Wandelweiser-in-Residence-Veranstaltungen in Vienna, the Ny music concerts in Boras (Sweden), the cooperation with Cologne pianist John McAlpine, the Bozzini Quartet (Montréal), QO-2 (Bruxelles), Die Maulwerker, incidental music, as well as the regular stays in Berlin (where during the last years many of his compositions were premiered). Frey is a member of the Wandelweiser Komponisten Ensemble which has presented concerts for more than 15 years in Europe, North America and Japan. Frey also organizes the concert series moments musicaux aarau as a forum for contemporary music."

-Other Minds (http://www.otherminds.org/shtml/Frey.shtml)
9/18/2017

"Angharad Davies is a violinist, one at ease in both improvising and composition, with a wide discography as part of varied range of ensembles and groups. She's a specialist in the art of 'preparing' her violin, adding objects or materials to it to extend its sound making properties. Her sensitivity to the sonic possibilities of musical situations and attentiveness to their shape and direction make her one of contemporary music's most fascinating figures. 2015 has seen her being commissioned for a new work at the Counterflows Festival, Glasgow and premiering Eliane Radigue's new solo for violin, Occam XXI at the El Nicho Festival, Mexico.

She's performed at, the Queen Elizabeth Hall, BBC Proms, Music We'd Like to Hear's concert series, is an associate artist at Cafe Oto, is a member of Apartment House, Cranc and Common Objects, been artist in residence at Q-02, and played live with Tony Conrad in the Turbine Room at the Tate Modern. Other collaborations have featured the likes of John Butcher, Daniela Cascella, Rhodri Davies, Julia Eckhardt , Kazuko Hohki, Roberta Jean, Lina Lapelyte, Dominic Lash, Tisha Mukarji, Andrea Neumann, Rie Nakajima, Tim Parkinson, J.G.Thirlwell, Stefan Thut, Paul Whitty, Manfred Werder, Birgit Ulher, Taku Unami and she's released records on Absinth Records, Another Timbre, Potlatch and Confrontrecords."

-Angharad Davies Website (http://www.angharaddavies.com/biog.html)
9/18/2017

"Peter Evans is a trumpet player, and improvisor/composer based in New York City since 2003. Evans is part of a broad, hybridized scene of musical experimentation and his work cuts across a wide range of modern musical practices and traditions. Peter is committed to the simultaneously self-determining and collaborative nature of musical improvisation as a compositional tool, and works with an ever-expanding group of musicians and composers in the creation of new music. His primary groups as a leader are the Peter Evans Quintet and the Zebulon trio. In addition, Evans has been performing and recording solo trumpet music since 2002 and is widely recognized as a leading voice in the field, having released several recordings over the past decade. He is a member of the cooperative groups Pulverize the Sound (with Mike Pride and Tim Dahl) and Rocket Science (with Evan Parker, Craig Taborn and Sam Pluta) and is constantly experimenting and forming new configurations with like minded players. As a composer, he has been commissioned by the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), Yarn/Wire, the Donaueschingen Musiktage Festival, the Jerome Foundation's Emerging Artist Program, and the Doris Duke Foundation for the 2015 Newport Jazz Festival. Evans has presented and/or performed his works at major festivals worldwide and tours his own groups extensively. He has worked with some of the leading figures in new music: John Zorn, Kassa Overall, Jim Black, Weasel Walter, Levy Lorenzo, Nate Wooley, Steve Schick, Mary Halvorson, Joe McPhee, George Lewis, and performs with both ICE and the Wet Ink Ensemble. He has been releasing recordings on his own label, More is More, since 2011."

-Peter Evans Website (http://pevans.squarespace.com/about/)
9/18/2017

Other Releases With These Artists:
Rowe, Keith / Michael Pisaro
13 Thirteen [2 CDs]
(erstwhile)
Zorn, John
There Is No More Firmament
(Tzadik)
Thut, Stefan / Seth Cooke
Aussen Raum [CASSETTE]
(Notice Recordings)
Frey, Jurg
Ephemeral Constructions
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Pisaro, Michael
Sometimes
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Skogen / Magnus Granberg
'Ist gefallen in den Schnee' (2010) and 'Despairs had Governed Me Too Long' (2012) [double CD reissue]
(Another Timbre)
Akama, Ryoko
Places And Pages [2 CDs]
(Another Timbre)
Silence Ensemble led by Peter Urpeth
John Cage: Speech
(FMR)
Davies, Rhodri / David Sylvian / Mark Wastell
There Is No Love
(Confront)
Holy Quintet, The (Change / Drouin / Lash / Lazardiou / Ryan)
Borough
(Mikroton Recordings)
Chessex, Antoine / Apartment House / Jerome Noetinger
"Plastic Concrete" / "Accumulation"
(Bocian)
Anemone (John Butcher / Peter Evans / Frederic Blondy / Clayton Thomas / Paul Lovens)
A Wing Dissolved in Light [VINYL]
(NoBusiness)
Zorn, John
There Is No More Firmament
(Tzadik)
Pisaro, Michael (w/ Didier Aschour / Stephane Garin)
Resting in a Fold of the Fog
(Potlatch)
Farmer, Patrick
Wild Horses Think Of Nothing Else The Sea - Tape Readings [2 CASSETTES + TEXT]
(Winds Measure)
Boon, Dante / Jurg Frey
clarinet (and piano)
(Another Timbre)
Cage, John
Complete Song Books [VINYL 2 LPs]
(KARLRECORDS)
Nono, Luigi / Jurg Frey
Works For Violin Duos
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Cage, John
Cartridge Music
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Pisaro, Michael / Reinier van Houdt
The Earth And The Sky [3 CDs]
(erstwhile)
Cundy, Chris
Gustav Lost
(FMR)
Evans, Peter
Lifeblood [USB Drive]
(More Is More)
Farmer / Munthe
Angle Of Repose
(Bug Incision Records)
Illogical Harmonies (Chang / Majkowski)
Volume
(Another Timbre)
Malfatti, Radu
Radu Malfatti
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Cage, John
Branches
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Zimmerlin, Alfred
Dunki . Frey . Aeschbacher . Capt . Hefti . Moster
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Frey, Jurg
Beuger . Cage
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Cage . Pisaro . Frey . Beuger
Accordion Music
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Capece, Lucio
Awareness About
(Another Timbre)
Davies, Angharad / Rhodri Davies / Michael Duch / Lina Lapelyte / John Lely & John Tilbury
Goldsmiths
(Another Timbre)
Sealed Knot, The
Trembling Shade
(Confront)
Malfatti / Drumm / Capece
The Volume Surrounding The Task
(Potlatch)
10tet (Akiyama / Kamura / Malfatti / Kinoshita / Okura / Veliotis / Unami / Koike / Filip / Sugimoto)
10tet
(Confront)
Wolff, Christian / Michael Pisaro
Looking Around
(erstwhile)
Frey, Jurg
24 Worter
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Cage, John
Empty Words
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Frey . Beuger / Duo Contour
Duos
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Beuger, Antoine
Two . Too (For Erwin-Josef Speckmann)
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Pisaro, Michael
Hearing Metal 1
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Cage, John
Early Music
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Pisaro, Michael
Harmony Series 11 - 16
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Pisaro, Michael
Transparent City (Volumes 3 And 4)
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Pisaro, Michael
Transparent City (Volumes 1 And 2)
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Cage. Schlothauer
For Seven Players
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Frey, Jurg
String Quartets
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Cage, John
One9
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Pisaro, Kathryn Gleasman
Beuger.Cage
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Wolff, Christian / Wandelweiser Komponisten Ensemble
Stones
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Frey, Jurg
Circles and Landscapes - works for solo piano played by Philip Thomas
(Another Timbre)
Emde, Gabriele
Die Natur der Klange: Neue Musik fur Harfe
(Edition Rz)
Hankil, Ryu / Noid / Matija Schellander and others
Foreign Correspondents [2 CDs]
(Mikroton Recordings)
Wastell, Mark
Quartet
(Confront)
Frey, Jurg
Grizzana and other pieces 2009-2014 [2 CDs]
(Another Timbre)
Convergence Quartet (Taylor Ho Bynum / Alexander Hawkins / Dominic Lash / Harris Eisenstadt)
Owl Jacket [VINYL]
(NoBusiness)
Keune, Stefan / Dominic Lash / Steve Noble
Fractions [VINYL]
(NoBusiness)
Davies, Rhodri
Pedwar [BOX SET, 4 LPs + INSERTS]
(Alt.Vinyl)
Common Objects: Butcher / Davies / Davies / Patterson
Whitewashed with Lines [2 CDs]
(Another Timbre)
Lambkin, Graham / Michael Pisaro
Schwarze Riesenfalter
(erstwhile)
Pisaro, Michael
Melody, Silence (For Solo Guitar)
(Potlatch)
Teletopa (Collins / Evans / Aherns / Frampton)
Tokyo 1972 [VINYL 3 LPs]
(Splitrec)
Akama, Ryoko / Bruno Duplant / Dominic Lash
Next To Nothing
(Another Timbre)
Parker, Evan ElectroAcoustic Septet
Seven
(Les Disques Victo)
Mostly Other People Do The Killing
Blue
(Hot Cup Records)
Frey, Jurg / Radu Malfatti
II
(erstwhile)
Pisaro / Chabala
Black, White, Red, Green, Blue (Voyelles) [2 CDs COLOR EDITION]
(Winds Measure Recordings)
Pisaro / Chabala
Black, White, Red, Green, Blue (Voyelles) [2 CDs]
(Winds Measure Recordings)
PBB'S Lacus Amoenus with Peter Evans
The Sauna Session
(Long Song Records)
Amado, Rodrigo Motion Trio & Peter Evans
Live in Lisbon [VINYL]
(NoBusiness)
Wastell, Mark
Caressed On The Brow By Unseen Hands
(Confront)
Pisaro / Chabala
Black, White, Red, Green, Blue (Voyelles) [CASSETTE]
(Winds Measure Recordings)
Pisaro, Michael
Closed Categories in Cartesian Worlds
(Gravity Wave)
Glover, Richard
Logical Harmonies
(Another Timbre)
Chang / Davies / Drouin / Durrant / Patterson / Tilbury
Variable Formations
(Another Timbre)
Thomas / Lash / Sanders
Skip
(FMR)
Rocket Science
Evan Parker / Peter Evans / Craig Taborn / Sam Pluta
(More Is More)
Common Objects: John Butcher / Rhodri Davies / Lee Patterson
Live In Morden Tower
(Mikroton Recordings)
Dahl, Anders & Skogen
Rows
(Another Timbre)
Beuger, Antoine
Cantor Quartets [2 CDs]
(Another Timbre)
Trumpets and Drums (Wooley / Evans / Black / Lytton)
Live in Ljubljana
(Clean Feed)
Beuger, Antoine / Michael Pisaro
this place / is love
(erstwhile)
Ist (Davies / Fell / Wastell)
Berlin
(Confront)
Convergence Quartet, The
Slow and Steady
(NoBusiness)
Parker, Evan
Hasselt
(psi)
Pisaro, Michael
The Punishment of the Tribe by its Elders
(Gravity Wave)
Pisaro, Michael
The Middle of Life (Die ganze Zeit)
(Gravity Wave)
Davies, Angharad and Cremaster (Monteiro / Fages)
Pluie Fine
(Potlatch)
McPhee, Joe
The Loneliest Woman [CD EP]
(Corbett vs. Dempsey)
Mostly Other People Do the Killing
Slippery Rock
(Hot Cup Records)
Malfatti, Radu / Taku Unami

(erstwhile)
Beuger, Antoine performed by Chabala / Lash / Owen
s'approcher s'eloigner s'absenter
(erstwhile)
Davies / Mukarji / Lazaridou-Chatzigoga
Outwash
(Another Timbre)
Pisaro, Michael / Toshiya Tsunoda
Crosshatches [2 CDs]
(erstwhile)
Cage, John
Sonatas & Interludes (1946 - 1948)
(Hat[now]ART)
Pisaro, Michael
fields have ears (6)
(Gravity Wave)
Pisaro, Michael / Greg Stuart
Hearing Metal 3
(Gravity Wave)
Pisaro, Michael / Greg Stuart
July Mountain: three versions
(Gravity Wave)
Pisaro, Michael / Greg Stuart
ricefall (2)
(Gravity Wave)
Ward / Hill / Lash / Sanders
Predicate
(FMR)
Parker, Evan / Lee / Evans
The Bleeding Edge
(psi)
Farmer / Kilymis / Hughes / Cornford
No Islands
(Another Timbre)
Recommended & Related Releases:
Other Recommended Releases:
Thut, Stefan / Seth Cooke
Aussen Raum [CASSETTE]
(Notice Recordings)
Pisaro, Michael
Sometimes
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Akama, Ryoko
Places And Pages [2 CDs]
(Another Timbre)
Silence Ensemble led by Peter Urpeth
John Cage: Speech
(FMR)
Cage, John
Complete Song Books [VINYL 2 LPs]
(KARLRECORDS)
Pisaro, Michael / Reinier van Houdt
The Earth And The Sky [3 CDs]
(erstwhile)
Illogical Harmonies (Chang / Majkowski)
Volume
(Another Timbre)
Harrison, Bryn
Receiving the Approaching Memory
(Another Timbre)
Malfatti, Radu
Radu Malfatti
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Cage, John
Branches
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Zimmerlin, Alfred
Dunki . Frey . Aeschbacher . Capt . Hefti . Moster
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Frey, Jurg
Beuger . Cage
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Poliks, Marek
Hull Treader
(Another Timbre)
Frey, Jurg (performed by Cristian Alvear)
Guitarist, Alone
(Another Timbre)
Capece, Lucio
Awareness About
(Another Timbre)
Davies, Angharad / Rhodri Davies / Michael Duch / Lina Lapelyte / John Lely & John Tilbury
Goldsmiths
(Another Timbre)
10tet (Akiyama / Kamura / Malfatti / Kinoshita / Okura / Veliotis / Unami / Koike / Filip / Sugimoto)
10tet
(Confront)
Frey, Jurg
24 Worter
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Frey, Jurg
String Quartets
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Beuger, Antoine
Silent Harmonies In Discrete Continuity
(Edition Wandelweiser Records)
Kudirka, Joseph
'Beauty and Industry' - ensemble works played by Apartment House
(Another Timbre)
Frey, Jurg
Circles and Landscapes - works for solo piano played by Philip Thomas
(Another Timbre)
Denyer, Frank
Whispers
(Another Timbre)
Lambkin, Graham / Michael Pisaro
Schwarze Riesenfalter
(erstwhile)
Pisaro, Michael
Melody, Silence (For Solo Guitar)
(Potlatch)
Lely, John played by Anton Lukoszevieze
The Harmonics Of Real Strings
(Another Timbre)

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