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Parker, William

Centering. Unreleased Early Recordings 1976-1987 [6 CD BOX + BOOK]

Parker, William: Centering. Unreleased Early Recordings 1976-1987 [6 CD BOX + BOOK] (NoBusiness)

The music on these six discs comes from roughly the first decade of William Parker's career, one of the most intensely creative periods enjoyed by any musician of any era.
 

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UPC: 4771906003810

Label: NoBusiness
Catalog ID: NBCD 42-47
Squidco Product Code: 16403

Format: 6 CDs + Book
Condition: New
Released: 2012
Country: Lithuania
Packaging: 6 CD Box Set w/ Book
Mastered by Arūnas Zujus at MAMAstudios.


Personnel:

William Parker-bass

Daniel Carter-alto saxophone, tenor saxophone, cornet, trumpet

John Hagen-tenor saxophone

Arthur Williams-trumpet

David S. Ware-tenor saxophone

Denis Charles-drums

Charles Gayle-tenor saxophone

Centering Dance Music Ensemble-voices

Brenda Bakr-voice

Ellen Christi-voice

Ellen Christi-voice

Lisa Sokolov-voice

Rashid Bakr-drums

Jemeel Moondoc-alto saxophone

Roy Campbell, Jr.-trumpet

Jay Oliver-bass

Jemeel Moondoc-alto saxophone

Ricardo Strobert-alto saxophone, flute

Charles Tyler-baritone saxophone

Raphe Malik-trumpet

Alex Lodico-trombone

Masahiko Kono-trombone

Zen Matsuura-drums

Lisa Sokolov-voice

Ellen Christi-voice

Rozanne Levine-clarinet

Malik Baraka-trumpet

John Mingione-trumpet

Billy Bang-violin

Ramsey Ameen-violin

Ellen Christi-voice

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Artist Biographies:

"William Parker is a bassist, improviser, composer, writer, and educator from New York City, heralded by The Village Voice as, "the most consistently brilliant free jazz bassist of all time."

In addition to recording over 150 albums, he has published six books and taught and mentored hundreds of young musicians and artists.

Parker's current bands include the Little Huey Creative Music Orchestra, In Order to Survive, Raining on the Moon, Stan's Hat Flapping in the Wind, and the Cosmic Mountain Quartet with Hamid Drake, Kidd Jordan, and Cooper-Moore. Throughout his career he has performed with Cecil Taylor, Don Cherry, Milford Graves, and David S. Ware, among others."

-William Parker Website (http://www.williamparker.net/)
11/14/2018

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Daniel Carter (born December 28, 1945, in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania) is an American experimental saxophone, flute, clarinet, and trumpet player active mainly in New York City since the early 1970s.

Carter is a prolific performer and has recorded or performed with William Parker, Federico Ughi, DJ Logic, Thurston Moore, Yo La Tengo, Sun Ra, Cecil Taylor, Sonic Youth, scientist/musician Matthew Putman, Cooper-Moore, Sam Rivers, David S. Ware, Yoko Ono, Living Colour, Medensky Martin and Wood and Jaco Pastorius among others. He is a member of the cooperative free jazz groups TEST and Other Dimensions In Music."

-577 Records (http://www.577records.com/danielcarter/)
11/14/2018

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"David S. Ware was a major jazz saxophonist, conceptualist and bandleader. As major as they come. He began practicing meditation as a young man; going forward, his spiritual and musical development were inseparably intertwined.

David S. Ware was born in Plainfield, New Jersey, on November 7, 1949. His early love of music was nurtured by some dedicated teachers at the Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School. He began his saxophone career at age 9 on alto, and then switched to baritone, before finally settling on the tenor as his musical voice. "I had played in all the school bands, the whole way through junior high and high school : marching band, concert band, dance band and orchestras." As a teen David was an ardent admirer of Sonny Rollins and struck up a relationship with the elder tenor player after seeing him countless times in the mid-'60s at the Five Spot and the Village Vanguard. The two practiced together intermittently in the '70s in Rollins' Brooklyn apartment; it was Rollins who taught young Ware the art of circular breathing in 1966.

By the late-'60s, David was attending music school in Boston and playing on the local scene with Stanton Davis, Cedric Lawson, Art Lande, and Michael Brecker, who later recalled: "I remember how completely wowed I was when I heard David play - we were about 17 or 18 - here was a tremendously gifted artistic and creative presence - an inspiration to all of us." While in Boston, David met drummer Marc Edwards and pianist Cooper-Moore (né Gene Ashton), and together they formed a trio called Apogee.

By 1973, David had moved to New York and became part of a circle of musicians, including Sam Rivers, David Murray, Butch Morris, Arthur Blythe, Don Pullen, Rashied Ali, and Frank Lowe, who were creating and cultivating their own loft-and-studio performing circuit at that time. Word of David's potent voice on tenor spread quickly, resulting in a flurry of crucial work. He became a member of the Cecil Taylor Unit in a group that included Marc Edwards, trumpeter Raphe Malik and the great alto saxophonist Jimmy Lyons, and performed with Taylor's legendary Carnegie Hall large ensemble. "Ware's distinct sound and Holy Roller fervor were already evident when he was 25, performing in Cecil Taylor's unforgettable 1974 Carnegie Hall big band." (Gary Giddins, Village Voice, August 1/7, 2001). Ware toured with the Cecil Taylor Unit throughout Europe, the U.S. and Canada, and recorded an album with this group, Dark To Themselves. Subsequently, Beaver Harris replaced Edwards on drums, which led to Ware joining Harris' 360 Degree Music Experience ensemble. It was also in this time period that David joined master drummer Andrew Cyrille's group Maono, who he remained with through the decade.

Birth of a Being, David's first recoding under his own name (a 1977 Apogee trio session with Cooper-Moore and Marc Edwards), was released by the Swiss label hatHut in 1979. By 1981, David had toured Europe a half-dozen times: with Andrew Cyrille's Maono, the Cecil Taylor Unit, and even once with his own group (which included Beaver Harris, Cooper-Moore and bassist Brian Smith), and he had recorded four albums with Cyrille's Maono, including Metamusicians' Stomp and Special People for the Italian label Black Saint/Soul Note. In the early '80s, he collaborated with drummer Milford Graves. He toured Europe again in 1985 with his own group, a trio with bassist Peter Kowald and drummers either Louis Moholo or Thurman Barker. In 1987, David served briefly in trumpeter Ahmed Abdullah's band, the Solomonic Quintet, and recorded one self-titled album with them for the Swedish label Silkheart.

During the '80s, David's concerns as a saxophonist shifted away from the rush and fury of extended improvisations, and into the area of concentrated thematic development. David formed a trio in 1988 with Marc Edwards and the astonishing bassist William Parker (also well-known in astute quarters by this time for his stellar presence in various Cecil Taylor groups), and recorded Passage To Music that year for Silkheart. In 1989, Ware put out the word that he was looking for a pianist. William Parker and Reggie Workman both recommended Matthew Shipp: "David got in touch with me and we started playing together. I was a big fan of Ware's work. Playing with Ware is like being at home. My style of piano really fits his compositions. He gives me freedom to be me. He doesn't put any restrictions on me."

In 1989, the David S. Ware Quartet was born. From that moment forward, Parker & Shipp were elemental mainstays. The only personnel changes in the DSWQ were the drummers: Whit Dickey replaced Edwards in 1992, followed by Susie Ibarra in 1996, and finally Guillermo E. Brown in 1999. "I'm seeing more and more the value of keeping a group together," said Ware at the time. "Rather than freelance with 14 different bands, you make the group an institution. Looking at jazz over the decades, I feel this is how the music grows the most. Musicians get a chance to be thorough, to know the material and be involved instead of skimming over the surface." Rather than compromise his musical vision, Ware chose to be patient. "I drove a cab for 14 years. I stayed out of the scene until I was ready to do my thing." He also refused to do sideman gigs. "Working with other musicians doesn't work for me. Philosophically, I find it difficult to be under someone else's umbrella."

The '90s saw the full-on actualization of this group, and the increasing recognition of David S. Ware as a true saxophone colossus. A series of ground-breaking albums by the David S. Ware Quartet were released in steady succession including: Great Bliss Vols. 1 & 2 on Silkheart; Flight of i, Third Ear Recitation, and Godspelized on the Japanese label DIW; Cryptology, DAO, and Wisdom of Uncertainty on the American labels, Homestead and AUM Fidelity. The DSWQ were one of the greatest bands in jazz history and one of the most highly acclaimed musical groups of the decade. David's efforts were partially rewarded by being among the very few jazz musicians of the modern era whose work was appreciated by listeners both inside and far outside the typical jazz audience. In an unprecedented coup, the Cryptology album garnered the coveted Lead Review slot in Rolling Stone.

In late 1997, David was signed to the Columbia Jazz label by Branford Marsalis. "Branford caught my show [Vienne, France 1995] and he really dug what he heard. He was sincerely moved by the music, which he hadn't heard before. He really flipped." Two years later, when Marsalis was named the new creative director of Columbia Jazz, he called Ware up. David again: "Musicians worry that once they get a deal with a major label they'll have to water down their music. But Branford said 'don't change a thing, just keep playing like yourself.'" The first album for Columbia, Go See The World, was released in 1998, and it was indeed as unrelentingly powerful as any Quartet record that had come before. The second album for Columbia, Surrendered, was recorded in October 1999 and released in May 2000. It featured interpolations of Charles Lloyd's "Sweet Georgia Bright" and Beaver Harris' "African Drums," as well as four beautiful new compositions by David S. Ware. This gorgeous album more prominently showcased the lyricism that had always been a core foundation of the Ware Quartet's music. After making these two albums for Columbia, and in the wake of their Jazz department's dissolution, ways were parted in December 2000. Wasting no time, David and the Quartet went into the studio in February of 2001 to make a new album for AUM Fidelity. These sessions were the first showcase for David's interest in expanded sonic templates for the Quartet, and featured Matthew Shipp on keyboard synthesizer for the first time ever on record. It was also the first album David had made since forming the Quartet to principally feature compositions created in the studio, rather than a set of pieces rehearsed and performed prior. The epic Corridors & Parallels album was the result, released in September 2001.

Shortly thereafter, the SFJazz organization commissioned Ware to prepare a new arrangement of Sonny Rollins' "The Freedom Suite," especially for the DSWQ to perform at their 2002 Spring Season. A studio recording of this beautiful new arrangement was then recorded in July and released in October 2002. "This is a perfect opportunity to show the link between me and Sonny," explained Ware, "an opportune time to show how one generation is built upon another and how the relationships work in the whole stream of music that's called jazz."

David carried forth the DNA of the greatest that have shaped the art of jazz, with an original sound and advanced concept that continued the further development of the art form. His formidable artistic skills went beyond being an impeccable saxophonist, improviser and conceptualist. Matthew Shipp had for some time expressed a strong desire to produce a record for his label The Blue Series that would more explicitly showcase David's talent as a composer. This came to fruition with the recording of Threads in 2003. The resulting music, built on delicate, cinematic rhythms and melodic fragments, reveals a classical sensibility, and sounds like a new form of jazz chamber music. On some tracks, Ware's sax is nowhere to be heard; his artistry is fully presented through his distinct compositional approach. David explains. "I'm interested in using different techniques to get to a place of transcendence. The thing that makes music great is that it's an infinite thing, an endless thing. Personally, I'm interested in going down more than one path, as far as the form, the melody are concerned. I don't want to restrict myself as to what area or style of music I can deal with."

After more than 15 years of performing with his quartet across Europe and the U.S., garnering a tremendous amount of critical acclaim along the way, the David S. Ware Quartet had not yet released a live recording. Rectifying that, Live in the World, released in 2005, was a three-disc offering of three different concerts, each representing different phases and selections of material. On performing live and touching on the transcendental, Ware says, "This is one of the ultimate things in musical experience, to touch upon that universal, that cosmic reality, that makes us all related. That makes us, all human beings on this planet, truly brothers and sisters."

In September of 2005, on the occasion of Sonny Rollins' induction into the Nesuhi Ertegun Jazz Hall of Fame presented by Jazz at Lincoln Center, Mr. Rollins invited David and the Quartet to perform a section of "Freedom Suite" as part of the ceremony.

By the Spring of 2006, David had a new set of compositions prepared for the Quartet, and it was decided to record these new pieces live in concert as well. That exquisite concert was the main headlining event at Vision Festival XI (NYC) in June 2006. It was also the last time that the DSWQ performed in the U.S. The resulting album, Renunciation, was released in April 2007 and was met with yet another round of acclaim from critics and fans alike. The DSWQ embarked on one final tour of Europe in Spring 2007 before disbanding, and the awesome penultimate concert of that tour was recorded and later released as the vinyl-only Live in Vilnius by NoBusiness Records.

Even before Renunciation was released, David was conceptualizing other configurations and beginning to compose for same. In July 2007, a new group featuring guitarist Joe Morris made its debut at the Iridium Jazz Club in NYC. This group's membership was solidified with the addition of David's stalwart musical companion William Parker on bass, and fellow master musician Warren Smith on drums; they embarked on a European tour in November 2007, and continued working toward a studio recording which took place in May of 2008. The gorgeous resulting album, Shakti, was released in January 2009.

2009 was David S. Ware's 50th year of playing saxophone. He had planned to celebrate this momentous occasion by recording a special project in the Spring with the resulting album to be released in the Fall. However, his health reached a critical state in December 2008. David had been on peritoneal dialysis since being diagnosed with kidney failure in 1999 and though he had been profoundly productive since that diagnosis, the prospect of living on dialysis had finally reached its outer limits. An urgent message/search for a kidney donor was sent out to AUM Fidelity's email list on January 16, 2009. Among other blessed humans, Laura Mehr responded to this call and on May 12, 2009 one of her kidneys was successfully transplanted. Infinite blessings upon her.

Only five months later, on October 15, 2009, David S. Ware made his triumphant return to the stage in a solo performance at Abrons Arts Center (NYC). This luminous concert - displaying an undiminished playing ability rich with new invention - prompted features in The New York Times and on NBC Nightly News. It was also recorded (of course), and released in March 2010 as Saturnian (solo saxophones, volume 1).

In December 2009 Ware returned to the studio, fulfilling the original idea of marking his 50th year of singular saxophone artistry with a special recording date. The session featured David on three different saxophones (saxello & stritch in addition to his customary tenor), along with William Parker on bass and Warren Smith on drums and tympani. The session was not preceded by group rehearsals (unlike most of his albums from the past 20 years) as the intent was to let the forms of this new music express themselves; trusting in the collective skill of the assembled musical masters to manifest the majesty. This session was of the godhead and was released as Onecept in the Fall of 2010. This trio made their live debut at Vision Festival XV, NYC in June and performed a stellar pair of sets at the Blue Note, NYC to celebrate the album's release in October 2010.

It must be stated plain and clear: David S. Ware's capacity for awe-inspiring invention and elocution thereof was stunning anew in this last stage of his creative life. His presentation of solo concerts continued with dates in Brooklyn (March 2010) and Chicago (Umbrella Festival, November 2010). Both of these were captured in full glory and released in September 2011 as the second installment in his planned series of solo recordings. In November 2010, a monumental new group communion took place at Brooklyn's Systems Two Studio: David S. Ware, Cooper-Moore, William Parker, and Muhammad Ali performed together for the first time ever. Planetary Unknown was the name of this group and the album, the release of which was celebrated with their worldwide live debut at Vision Festival on June 10, 2011. David was invited to perform at Jazzfestival Saalfelden in August 2011. That stunning concert was his final public performance. The final year of David's life was especially fraught with a series of severely increasing health complications stemming from the required regimen of immunosuppresant medications and his body's reaction to same. He fought hard and focused on the day when he would be able to play music again, looking forward to picking up even more new instruments.

His body finally succumbing to an aggressive blood infection, David S. Ware passed away on the night of October 18, 2012 at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ.

The blessings of his musical legacy will radiate for a very, very long time to come."-Steven Joerg

-David S. Ware Website (http://www.davidsware.com/biography)
11/14/2018

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Rashid Bakr (born Charles Downs, October 3, 1943 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American free jazz drummer. During the 1970s he was active in the New York Loft Jazz scene, performing at venues such as Rashied Ali's "Ali's Alley" and Sam Rivers' "Studio Rivbea" as a member of Ensemble Muntu along with Jemeel Moondoc among others. He went on to perform with Cecil Taylor in the early 1980s, appearing on the albums "The Eighth" and"Winged Serpent (Sliding Quadrants)". Bakr is a member of Other Dimensions in Music, along with Roy Campbell, Daniel Carter and William Parker."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rashid_Bakr_(musician))
11/14/2018

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"It was Cecil Taylor who brought the young JEMEEL MOONDOC into modern jazz, and Jemeel has remained a devoted disciple ever since. Moondoc studied with Cecil Taylor and played in his Black Music Ensemble at Antioch College in 1970 - 1971, becoming a featured soloist. Moondoc's own early groups, the Ensemble Muntu, which included Arthur Williams, Mark Hennen, Roy Campbell Jr. William Parker, Rashid Bakr, et al, was very much in the Taylor mold, but Moondoc remained open to other influences as well; the recent release of a three-CD box set, The Muntu Recordings, (NoBusiness Records NBCD 7-8-9) chronicles the first recordings and performances of Jemeel Moondoc and Muntu during the New York loft jazz scene. (see http://www.pointofdeparture.org/PoD27/PoD27Muntu.html)

In the 1980's Moondoc made three recordings for Soul Note Records including Judy's Bounce with Ed Blackwell and Fred Hopkins. This recording in particular gave Moondoc recognition as an innovative improviser and composer; his playing style sits somewhere between Ornette's country wail and Jimmy Lyons street corner preaching. In 1983 Moondoc formed the Jus Grew Orchestra, a group of improvisers that included Roy Campbell Jr. Bern Nix, Zane Massey, Steve Swell, Codaryl Moffett, Nathan Breedlove, John Voigt and others. Moondoc composed extensively, understanding, as did Mingus and Ellington, that t he strength and power of composition lies with the individual and unique talents of the orchestra members, he also use a technique called 'conduction' which is an improvisational technique were the conductor can guide the entire group through unwritten passages. At one point for about a year and a half during 1983 and 1984 Jemeel Moondoc and Jus Grew Orchestra performed every Thursday night at the Neither-Nor bookstore on East 5th Street. The Orchestra also did stints at the Nuyorican Poets Café, and First on First, with intermittent performances at the Fez. The Jus Grew Orchestra made two live CD performances - Spirit House [Eremite, 2000], recorded at UMASS at its Magic Triangle Jazz Series, and Live at the Vision Festival [Ayler, 2002].

Between 1985 and 1996 Jemeel Moondoc could not secure a recording date. "There was a lack of interest in recording so-called free jazz at the time", recalls Moondoc. "I remember thinking that the whole music scene was going downhill, I was still playing, I just didn't record, it didn't really bother me because I knew I was going to get the opportunity to record again".

In 1995 Moondoc began a recording relationship with the now renowned Eremite Records label (eremite.com/eremite); between 1996 and 2002 he recorded several records on Eremite. The most acclaimed is Revolt of the Negro Lawn Jockeys 2001. This recording "shows a musician capable of drawing together the post-bop linage that includes Jackie McClean and Charles Mingus, and the free-jazz energy music tradition of Ornette Coleman and Cecil Taylor into one grand swinging synthesis", writes Ed Hazell in the liner notes. "Any quintet lineup featuring alto sax, vibes, bass and drums inevitably invites comparison with Eric Dolphy's Out To Lunch. Hard act to follow, but Jemeel Moondoc can hold his head up high. Those who take perverse pleasure in announcing the death of jazz in all its forms, should be strapped to a table and forced to listen to this 47-minute set until their ears bleed". - Dan Warburton, Paiisiantransatlantic.com . Jemeel Moondoc's "unorthodoxies are deeply rooted in the knowledge of and a profound feeling for his craft. His heavily vocalized sound on alto combines the sharp edge of Jackie McLean and a gentleness of tone reminiscent of Joe Henderson. He manipulates timbre as expressively as Albert Ayler. The vivid animation and emotionalism of his playing again recall Ayler , along with another of Black Musuc's great exponents, the South African musician Dudu Pukwana". But "Moondoc's rhythmic concept, delivery, and sense of space are completely unique; his phrases slip and wobble prankishly, forming impossible oblique shapes, while somehow holding to a melodic line". "Moondoc gives everything he does an old-world, future-world, other-word plurality. He is one of the most singular players in music, and one of the most eloquent and communicative storytellers", explains Michael Ehlers of Eremite Records.

Moondoc is currently associated with the newly formed Relative Pitch Records, his newly released CD, Two 2012, is an intriguing duo dialogue between Connie Crothers and Moondoc, "the program finds the two players engaging in an off-the-cuff improvisations - the takeaway from this intimate series of duets is that Crothers and Moondoc are kindred souls - not the sort who traffic in cheap musical melodrama - the emotional reach in their interactions is real." (Derek Taylor - Dusted Magazine). Moondoc's newest release The Zookeeper's House 2014, has started to gain some critical acclaim. "Alto saxophonist Jemeel Moondoc has been keeping the faith in a post-free-jazz mindset for many years, working with bassist William Parker and others on the adventuresome avant-jazz fringes. He continues his progression with The Zookeeper's House, The new five-track set, with different groupings and musical angles, captures a distinctly live vibrancy and in-the-moment vulnerability in the studio. On the opening track, Moondoc is joined by sensitive foil Matthew Shipp on piano, bassist Hilliard Green and drummer Newman Taylor Baker, laying out the rumbling ruminations for Moondoc's six note, Albert Ayler-esque theme, played with brittle fervor by the saxophonist. Structure yields to abandon, and Moondoc's toothy, sharp-toned burst, angular fragments and sense of space alight, with empathetic help from his allies. On "Little Blue Elvira," a kind of ambling, slap-happy horn trio-with trumpeter Roy Campbell Jr. (who died a few months after this session, and to whom the album is dedicated) and trombonist Steve Swell joining the leader in unison-conjures up a Mingus vibe. Loose essences of Coltrane (or the Coltranes) are worked into the album's fabric with Alice Coltrane's "Ptah The El Daoud," another chord-less setting with Swell and Campbell, and the aptly named "One For Monk & Trane." "For The Love Of Cindy," with only drums, bass and the saxophonist's poetically embracing space, ends the album on an airy note, with a bittersweet ambiance vaguely redolent of Ornette Coleman's "Lonely Woman," but less lonely. With The Zookeeper's House; Moondoc returns-and-continues-a bit deeper and wiser". Josef Woodard-Downbeat Magizine October 2014"

-Jemeel Moondoc Website (https://www.jemeelmoondoc.com/biography)
11/14/2018

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Roy Sinclair Campbell Jr. (September 29, 1952 - January 9, 2014) was an American trumpeter frequently linked to free jazz, although he also performed rhythm and blues and funk during his career.

Born in Los Angeles, California, in 1952, Campbell was raised in New York City. At the age of fifteen he began learning to play trumpet and soon studied at the Jazz Mobile program along with Kenny Dorham, Lee Morgan and Joe Newman. Throughout the 1960s, still unacquainted with the avant-garde movement, Campbell performed in the big bands of the Manhattan Community College. From the 1970s onwards he performed primarily within the context of free jazz, spending some of this period studying with Yusef Lateef.

In the early 1990s Campbell moved to the Netherlands and performed regularly with Klaas Hekman and Don Cherry. In addition to leading his own groups, he performed with Yo La Tengo, William Parker, Peter Brotzmann, Matthew Shipp, and other improvisors. Upon returning to the United States he began leading his group Other Dimensions In Music and also formed the Pyramid Trio, a pianoless trio formed with William Parker. He performed regularly as part of the Festival of New Trumpet Music, which is held annually in New York City.

He died in January 2014 of hypertensive atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease at the age of 61."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Campbell_Jr.)
11/14/2018

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"It was Cecil Taylor who brought the young JEMEEL MOONDOC into modern jazz, and Jemeel has remained a devoted disciple ever since. Moondoc studied with Cecil Taylor and played in his Black Music Ensemble at Antioch College in 1970 - 1971, becoming a featured soloist. Moondoc's own early groups, the Ensemble Muntu, which included Arthur Williams, Mark Hennen, Roy Campbell Jr. William Parker, Rashid Bakr, et al, was very much in the Taylor mold, but Moondoc remained open to other influences as well; the recent release of a three-CD box set, The Muntu Recordings, (NoBusiness Records NBCD 7-8-9) chronicles the first recordings and performances of Jemeel Moondoc and Muntu during the New York loft jazz scene. (see http://www.pointofdeparture.org/PoD27/PoD27Muntu.html)

In the 1980's Moondoc made three recordings for Soul Note Records including Judy's Bounce with Ed Blackwell and Fred Hopkins. This recording in particular gave Moondoc recognition as an innovative improviser and composer; his playing style sits somewhere between Ornette's country wail and Jimmy Lyons street corner preaching. In 1983 Moondoc formed the Jus Grew Orchestra, a group of improvisers that included Roy Campbell Jr. Bern Nix, Zane Massey, Steve Swell, Codaryl Moffett, Nathan Breedlove, John Voigt and others. Moondoc composed extensively, understanding, as did Mingus and Ellington, that t he strength and power of composition lies with the individual and unique talents of the orchestra members, he also use a technique called 'conduction' which is an improvisational technique were the conductor can guide the entire group through unwritten passages. At one point for about a year and a half during 1983 and 1984 Jemeel Moondoc and Jus Grew Orchestra performed every Thursday night at the Neither-Nor bookstore on East 5th Street. The Orchestra also did stints at the Nuyorican Poets Café, and First on First, with intermittent performances at the Fez. The Jus Grew Orchestra made two live CD performances - Spirit House [Eremite, 2000], recorded at UMASS at its Magic Triangle Jazz Series, and Live at the Vision Festival [Ayler, 2002].

Between 1985 and 1996 Jemeel Moondoc could not secure a recording date. "There was a lack of interest in recording so-called free jazz at the time", recalls Moondoc. "I remember thinking that the whole music scene was going downhill, I was still playing, I just didn't record, it didn't really bother me because I knew I was going to get the opportunity to record again".

In 1995 Moondoc began a recording relationship with the now renowned Eremite Records label (eremite.com/eremite); between 1996 and 2002 he recorded several records on Eremite. The most acclaimed is Revolt of the Negro Lawn Jockeys 2001. This recording "shows a musician capable of drawing together the post-bop linage that includes Jackie McClean and Charles Mingus, and the free-jazz energy music tradition of Ornette Coleman and Cecil Taylor into one grand swinging synthesis", writes Ed Hazell in the liner notes. "Any quintet lineup featuring alto sax, vibes, bass and drums inevitably invites comparison with Eric Dolphy's Out To Lunch. Hard act to follow, but Jemeel Moondoc can hold his head up high. Those who take perverse pleasure in announcing the death of jazz in all its forms, should be strapped to a table and forced to listen to this 47-minute set until their ears bleed". - Dan Warburton, Paiisiantransatlantic.com . Jemeel Moondoc's "unorthodoxies are deeply rooted in the knowledge of and a profound feeling for his craft. His heavily vocalized sound on alto combines the sharp edge of Jackie McLean and a gentleness of tone reminiscent of Joe Henderson. He manipulates timbre as expressively as Albert Ayler. The vivid animation and emotionalism of his playing again recall Ayler , along with another of Black Musuc's great exponents, the South African musician Dudu Pukwana". But "Moondoc's rhythmic concept, delivery, and sense of space are completely unique; his phrases slip and wobble prankishly, forming impossible oblique shapes, while somehow holding to a melodic line". "Moondoc gives everything he does an old-world, future-world, other-word plurality. He is one of the most singular players in music, and one of the most eloquent and communicative storytellers", explains Michael Ehlers of Eremite Records.

Moondoc is currently associated with the newly formed Relative Pitch Records, his newly released CD, Two 2012, is an intriguing duo dialogue between Connie Crothers and Moondoc, "the program finds the two players engaging in an off-the-cuff improvisations - the takeaway from this intimate series of duets is that Crothers and Moondoc are kindred souls - not the sort who traffic in cheap musical melodrama - the emotional reach in their interactions is real." (Derek Taylor - Dusted Magazine). Moondoc's newest release The Zookeeper's House 2014, has started to gain some critical acclaim. "Alto saxophonist Jemeel Moondoc has been keeping the faith in a post-free-jazz mindset for many years, working with bassist William Parker and others on the adventuresome avant-jazz fringes. He continues his progression with The Zookeeper's House, The new five-track set, with different groupings and musical angles, captures a distinctly live vibrancy and in-the-moment vulnerability in the studio. On the opening track, Moondoc is joined by sensitive foil Matthew Shipp on piano, bassist Hilliard Green and drummer Newman Taylor Baker, laying out the rumbling ruminations for Moondoc's six note, Albert Ayler-esque theme, played with brittle fervor by the saxophonist. Structure yields to abandon, and Moondoc's toothy, sharp-toned burst, angular fragments and sense of space alight, with empathetic help from his allies. On "Little Blue Elvira," a kind of ambling, slap-happy horn trio-with trumpeter Roy Campbell Jr. (who died a few months after this session, and to whom the album is dedicated) and trombonist Steve Swell joining the leader in unison-conjures up a Mingus vibe. Loose essences of Coltrane (or the Coltranes) are worked into the album's fabric with Alice Coltrane's "Ptah The El Daoud," another chord-less setting with Swell and Campbell, and the aptly named "One For Monk & Trane." "For The Love Of Cindy," with only drums, bass and the saxophonist's poetically embracing space, ends the album on an airy note, with a bittersweet ambiance vaguely redolent of Ornette Coleman's "Lonely Woman," but less lonely. With The Zookeeper's House; Moondoc returns-and-continues-a bit deeper and wiser". Josef Woodard-Downbeat Magizine October 2014"

-Jemeel Moondoc Website (https://www.jemeelmoondoc.com/biography)
11/14/2018

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Charles Lacy Tyler (July 20, 1941 - June 27, 1992) was an American jazz baritone saxophonist. He also played alto saxophone and clarinet.

Tyler was born in Cadiz, Kentucky, and spent his childhood years in Indianapolis. He played piano as a child and clarinet at 7, before switching to alto in his early teens, and finally baritone saxophone. During the summers, he visited Chicago, New York City and Cleveland, Ohio, where he met the young tenor saxophonist Albert Ayler at age 14. After sering in the army from 1957-1959, Tyler relocated to Cleveland in 1960 and began playing with Ayler, conmuting between New York and Cleveland. During that period played with Ornette Coleman and Sunny Murray.

In 1965 Tyler recorded Bells and Spirits Rejoice with Alyer's group. He recorded his first album as leader the following year for ESP-Disk. He returned to Indianapolis to study with David Baker at Indiana University between 1967 and 1968, recording a second album for ESP, Eastern Man Alone. In 1968, he transferred to the University of California, Berkeley to study and teach. In Los Angeles, he worked with Arthur Blythe, Bobby Bradford, and David Murray.

He moved back to New York in 1974, leading his own groups with Blythe, trumpeter Earl Cross, drummer Steve Reid and others, recording the album Voyage from Jericho on Tyler's own Akba label. In 1975, Tyler enrolled at Columbia University and made an extensive tour of Scandinavia, releasing his second Akba album Live in Europe. In 1976, he performed the piece "Saga of the Outlaws" at Sam Rivers's Studio Rivbea, released two years later on Nessa Records. During that period he played as a sideman or co-leader with Steve Reid, Cecil Taylor and Billy Bang.

In 1982, during a European tour with Sun Ra's Orchestra, he relocated to Denmark, and in 1985 he moved to France, recording with other expatriates like Khan Jamal in Copenhagen and Steve Lacy in Paris.

Tyler died in Toulon, France of heart failure in June 1992."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Tyler_(musician))
11/14/2018

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Masahiko Kono was born December 7, 1951, in Kawasaki, Kanagawa prefecture, Japan. He started playing flute in 1966, when he was in high school. In 1971, as a student at Wako University in Tokyo, his friend the late pianist Yoshito Osawa introduced Kono to trumpeter Toshinori Kondo. Soon thereafter Kono gave up the flute for the trumpet in order to study trumpet with Kondo. Preferring the sound of the trombone to that of the trumpet, however, Kono took up trombone in 1976. Among the trombonists he listened to a great deal at that time were Paul Rutherford, George Lewis and Roswell Rudd. Kono formed a free jazz/free improvisation group called Tree which, besides himself, consisted of two sax players and a guitarist. The group toured around Japan for about a year and then disbanded. Subsequently, Kono sometimes participated in the group EEU (Evolution Ensemble Unit), which was formed by Kondo, drummer Toshiyuki Tsuchitori, sax player Mototeru Takagi and bassist Motoharu Yoshizawa, and played with numerous other musicians, including violinist Takehisa Kosugi.

Kono made his first trip to New York City in the fall of 1980 and stayed there for three months. During this time he met and played at jazz clubs with American musicians such as percussionist Milford Graves, guitarist Elliot Sharp and bassist William Parker. After returning to Japan, he played/toured with Japanese musicians like Kondo, drummer Shoji Hano and pianist Katsuo Itabashi (with whom he made a duo album in 1983), and non-Japanese musicians like violinist Billy Bang, drummer Paul Lovens and guitarist Derek Bailey.

In the summer of '83, Kono returned to New York City, planning to go on to Mexico. At the time he had no intention of living in New York. While there, however, he frequented a club called Saint, where alto sax player John Zorn had a weekly gig. When Zorn and guitarist Fred Frith invited Kono to join them in a concert, he postponed his visit to Mexico, and eventually decided to settle in New York with his family. In 1984 he played at the Kool Jazz Festival as a member of bassist William Parker's big band. From 1985 to the early '90s, he often played with alto sax player Jemeel Moondoc's Jus Grew Orchestra. He appeared on FM station WKCR in 1987, performing with alto sax player Ken McIntyre and percussionist Warren Smith. In the fall of that year he gave a duo performance with George Lewis at the club The Kitchen, in a festival showcasing Japanese musicians that was produced by Zorn and guitarist Arto Lindsay. In 1989 Kono participated in a studio recording by drummer William Hooker, which was later released with the title The Firmament Fury. In the same year, Kono received his U.S. residency. He spent a month in Japan in December '91-January '92, during which he played with such musicians as Kosugi, Yoshizawa, Hano and guitarist Haruhiko Gotsu.

In fall of 1992, Kono spent two weeks in Oaxaca, Mexico, a place he had long wanted to visit. In addition to joining in various local bands, including a salsa and a folk dance band, he played alone on downtown streets and near the ruins of Monte Alban. Although his visit was brief, he feels he gained a great deal from his experiences in Mexico. (While there he made a solo recording using a portable cassette tape recorder, and this was later released as a tape entitled Mexico.)

In the '90s, Kono has played and recorded as a member of William Hooker's band and of the Ellen Christie and Fiorenzo Sordini Quintet. The former band's live recordings from November '92 and April '94 were later released as a CD called Radiation; and the latter band's 1991 studio recording was released the following year as the CD A Piece of the Rock. In '93 the Christie and Sordini Quintet, with Kono, toured in Italy, Austria and North America. Kono played often over a one-year period with cellist Boris Rayskin, and participated in William Parker and the Little Huey Creative Music Orchestra, whose live recording of 1994 was released as th CD Flowers Grow In My Room. For the past several years he has played with José Halac, and he participated in the 1994 Halac recording which became the CD Illegal Edge. Since 1995, Kono has played many times with pianist Cecil Taylor's big band. Currently, he also plays regularly with Japanese bassist Hideki Kato, another New York resident. Kono led a group consisting of himself, Zusaan Kali Fasteau, Halac and Kato in a performance at the Vision for the 21st Century Arts Festival in New York in June of 1996."

-Improvised Music from Japan (http://www.japanimprov.com/kono/profile.html)
11/14/2018

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Drummer Zen Matsuura, aka Takeshi Zen Matsuura, born in Kobe, Hyogo, Japan, performing in New York City starting in the 1980's. He died September 19th, 2015. He was a member of Billy Bang Sextet, Commitment, Roy Campbell Pyramid Trio, and performed with William Parker.

-Squidco 11/14/2018

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"Billy Bang (September 20, 1947 April 11, 2011), born William Vincent Walker, was an American free jazz violinist and composer.

Bang's family moved to New York City's Bronx neighborhood while he was still an infant, and as a child he attended a special school for musicians in nearby Harlem. At that school, students were assigned instruments based on their physical size. Bang was fairly small, so he received a violin instead of either of his first choices, the saxophone or the drums. It was around this time that he acquired the nickname of "Billy Bang", derived from a popular cartoon character.

Bang studied the violin until he earned a hardship scholarship to the Stockbridge School in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, at which point he abandoned the instrument because the school did not have a music program. He had difficulty adjusting to life at the school, where he encountered racism and developed confusion about his identity, which he later blamed for his onset of schizophrenia. Bang felt that he had little in common with the largely privileged children at the school, who included Jackie Robinson, Jr. (son of baseball star Jackie Robinson) and Arlo Guthrie, and he struggled to reconcile the disparity between the wealth of the school and the poverty of his home in New York. He left the school after two years and attended a school in the Bronx. He did not graduate, decided not to return to school after receiving his draft papers, and at the age of 18, he was drafted into the United States Army.

Bang spent six months in basic training and another two weeks learning jungle warfare, arriving in Vietnam just in time for the Tet Offensive. Starting out as an infantryman, he did one tour of combat duty, rising to the rank of sergeant before he mustered out.

After Bang returned from the war, his life lacked direction. The job he had held before the army had been filled in his absence. He pursued and then abandoned a law degree, before becoming politically active and falling in with an underground group of revolutionaries. The group recognized Bang's knowledge of weapons from his time in the Army, and they used him to procure firearms for the group during trips to Maryland and Virginia, buying from pawnshops and other small operators who did not conduct extensive background checks. During one of these trips, Bang spotted three violins hanging at the back of a pawnshop, and he impulsively purchased one.

He later joined Sun Ra's band. In 1977, Bang co-founded the String Trio of New York (with guitarist James Emery and double bassist John Lindberg). Billy Bang explored his experience in Vietnam in two albums: Vietnam: The Aftermath (2001) and Vietnam: Reflections (2005), recorded with a band which included several other veterans of that war. The latter album also features two Vietnamese musicians based in the United States (voice and n tranh zither).

Bang died on April 11, 2011. According to an associate, Bang had suffered from lung cancer. He had been scheduled to perform on the opening day of the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival on June 10, 2011. He is buried at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, New York."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Bang)
11/14/2018

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track listing:


DISC ONE
William Parker-Daniel Carter Duo

1. Thulin (28:33)
2. Time and Period (25:51)
Daniel Carter (alto sax, trumpet); William Parker (bass)
William Parker Ensemble

3. Commitment (21:38)
William Parker (bass); John Hagen (tenor sax); Arthur Williams (trumpet)


DISC TWO
Centering Dance Music Ensemble 1980

1. Facing the Sun, One is Never the Same (24:18)
2. One Day Understanding (Variation on a Theme by Albert Ayler) (22:28)
3. Bass Interlude (1:55)
4. Tapestry (16:28)
David S. Ware (tenor sax); William Parker (bass); Denis Charles (drums); with Patricia Nicholson (dance)



DISC THREE
Centering Dance Music Ensemble 1980 (continued)
1. Rainbow Light (26:56)
William Parker-Charles Gayle Duo
2. Crosses (Long Scarf Over Canal Street) (18:39)
3. Entrusted Spirit (Dedicated to Bilal Abdur Rahman) (19:08)
Charles Gayle (tenor sax); William Parker (bass)
Centering Dance Music Ensemble: Voices

4. Angel Dance (5:50)
5. Sincerity (6:39)
6. In the Thicket (1:22)
Brenda Bakr (voice on 4); Ellen Christi (voice on 5); Brenda Bakr, Ellen Christi, and Lisa Sokolov (voices on 6); William Parker (bass); Rashid Bakr (drums)


DISC FOUR
Big Moon Ensemble

1. Dedication to Kenneth Patchen (24:59)
2. Hiroshima, Part One (16:30)
3. Hiroshima, Part Two (28:44)
Jemeel Moondoc (alto sax), Daniel Carter (alto sax, tenor sax, trumpet, cornet); Arthur Williams, Roy Campbell, Jr. (trumpet); William Parker (bass, recitation); Jay Oliver (bass); Denis Charles, Rashid Bakr (drums)



DISC FIVE
Centering Big Band (Extending the Clues)

1. Ankti (Extending the Clues) (12:59)
2. Munyaovi (Cliff of the Porcupine) (14:46)
3. Palatala (Red Light of Sunrise) (4:35)
4. Lomahongva (Beautiful Clouds Arising) (29:10)
5. Tototo (Warrior Spirit Who Sings) (10:58)
Daniel Carter, Jemeel Moondoc (alto sax), Ricardo Strobert (alto sax, flute); David S. Ware (tenor sax); Charles Tyler (baritone sax); Raphe Malik, Roy Campbell, Jr. (trumpet); Alex Lodico, Masahiko Kono (trombone); William Parker (bass); Zen Matsuura (drums); Lisa Sokolov, Ellen Christi (voice)


DISC SIX
Centering Dance Music Ensemble 1976 (Dawn Voice)
1. Illuminese/Voice (34:07)
2. Falling Shadows (13:06)
3. Dawn/Face Still, Hands Folded (30:52)
Rozanne Levine (clarinet); Malik Baraka, John Mingione (trumpet); Billy Bang, Ramsey Ameen (violin); William Parker (bass, recitation); Ellen Christi (voice); with Patricia Nicholson
sample the album:








descriptions, reviews, &c.

The music on these six discs comes from roughly the first decade of William Parker's career, one of the most intensely creative periods enjoyed by any musician of any era. It's safe to say that much of the music will come as a revelation to even his most devoted listeners.

Related Categories of Interest:


Improvised Music
Jazz
NY Downtown & Jazz/Improv
Box Sets
Parker, William
Book
Staff Picks & Recommended Items
Top 25 for 2012
Instant Rewards


Other Releases With These Artists:
Ayler, Albert
Bells (White VINYL 180gm)
(ESP-Disk)
Zankel, Bobby & The Wonderful Sound 6
Celebrating William Parker at 65
(Not Two)
Parker, William
Voices Fall From The Sky [3 CD BOX SET]
(Aum Fidelity)
Gjerstad, Frode / Hamid Drake / William Parker
[4-CD BOX SET]
(Not Two)
Carter, Daniel / William Parker / Matthew Shipp
Seraphic Light (Live At Tufts University)
(Aum Fidelity)
Carter, Daniel / Demian Richardson / Matthew Putman / David Moss / Federico Ughi
The Gowanus Recordings [VINYL + DOWNLOAD]
(577)
Carter, Daniel / William Parker / Federico Ughi
The Dream [VINYL + DOWNLOAD]
(577)
Carter, Daniel / Patrick Holmes / Matthew Putman / Hilliard Greene / Federico Ughi
Telepathic Alliances [VINYL + DOWNLOAD]
(577)
Parker, William
Conversations II Dialogues & Monologues [CD & BOOK]
(RogueArt)
Perelman, Ivo / Matthew Shipp / William Parker / Bobby Kapp
Heptagon
(Leo)
Ware, David S. Trio
Live in New York, 2010 [2 CDs]
(Aum Fidelity)
Bang, Billy
Distinction Without a Difference
(Corbett vs. Dempsey)
Perelman, Ivo & Matthew Shipp (w/ William Parker / Whit Dickey)
The Art Of Perelman-Shipp Volume 5 Rhea
(Leo)
Perelman, Ivo & Matthew Shipp (w/ William Parker / Whit Dickey)
The Art Of Perelman-Shipp Volume 3 Pandora
(Leo)
Perelman, Ivo & Matthew Shipp (w/ William Parker)
The Art Of Perelman-Shipp Volume 1 Titan
(Leo)
Parker, William Quartets
Meditation / Resurrection [2 CDs]
(Aum Fidelity)
Ware, David S. Trio
Live in New York, 2010 [2 CDs]
(Aum Fidelity)
Perelman, Ivo / William Parker / Gerald Cleaver
The Art Of The Improv Trio Volume 4
(Leo)
Nu Band, The
The Final Concert [VINYL]
(NoBusiness)
Chadbourne, Eugene
Boogie With The Hook
(Leo)
Brotzmann, Peter / William Parker / Hamid Drake
Song Sentimentale [VINYL]
(Otoroku)
Williams, Arthur (w/ Peter Kuhn / Toshinori Kondo / William Parker / Denis Charles)
Forgiveness Suite [VINYL]
(NoBusiness)
Kuhn, Peter (w/ Toshinori Kondo / Arthur Williams / William Parker / Denis Charles)
No Coming, No Going. The Music of Peter Kuhn, 1978-1979 [2 CDs]
(NoBusiness)
Elisha, Ehran / Kindred Spirit
Kindred Spirts: Quintets [2 CDs]
(OutNow Recordings)
Moondoc, Jemeel / Hilliard Greene
Cosmic Nickelodeon
(Relative Pitch)
Hooker, William
Light (1975 - 1989) [4 CD Box Set]
(NoBusiness)
Parker, William / Raining on the Moon
Great Spirit
(Aum Fidelity)
Swell's, Steve Kende Dreams (Swell/ Brown / Crothers / Parker / Taylor)
Hommage A Bartok
(Silkheart)
The Turbine! (Bankhead / Duboc / Drake / Lopez + guests)
Entropy/Enthalpy [2 CDs]
(RogueArt)
Carter, Daniel / Federico Ughi
Extra Room [VINYL + DOWNLOAD]
(577)
Innanen, Mikko / William Parker / Andrew Cyrille
Song For A New Decade [2 CDs]
(Tum)
Malaby, Tony Tamarindo
Somos Agua
(Clean Feed)
Moondoc, Jemeel
The Zoopkeeper's House (Trio/Quartet/Quintet)
(Relative Pitch)
Bang, Billy
Da Bang!
(Tum)
Perelman, Ivo / Matthew Shipp / William Parker / Gerald Cleaver
Serendipity
(Leo)
Shipp, Matthew
Greatest Hits
(Thirsty Ear)
Moondoc, Jemeel / Connie Crothers
Two
(Relative Pitch)
Morris, Joe / William Parker / Gerald Cleaver
Altitude
(Aum Fidelity)
Element Choir, The & William Parker
At Christ Church Deer Park
(Barnyard)
Fasteau, Kali
Vivid
(Flying Note)
Malaby, Tony
Tamarindo Live
(Clean Feed)
Tyler, Charles
Eastern Man Alone
(ESP-Disk)
Parker, William - The Inside Songs of Curtis Mayfield
I Plan To Stay A Believer [2 CDs]
(Aum Fidelity)
Deep Tones for Peace
Kadima Triptych Series
(Kadima Triptych)
Parker, William
At Somewhere There
(Barnyard)
Tyler, Charles + Brus Trio
Autumn in Paris
(Silkheart)
Parker, William Quartet
Petit Oiseau
(Aum Fidelity)
Braxton, Anthony / Milford Graves / William Parker
Beyond Quantum
(Tzadik)
Shipp Trio, Matthew
The Multiplication Table (re-issue)
(Hatology)
Moondoc Tentet, Jemeel / Jus Grew Orchestra
Live at the Vision Festival 2001
(Ayler)
Drake, Hamid / Bindu
Blissful
(RogueArt)
Moshe Quartet, Ras
Transcendence
(KMB Jazz)
Brown Ensemble, Rob
Crown Trunk Root Funk
(Aum Fidelity)
Malaby, Tony
Tamarindo
(Clean Feed)
Norton's Metaphor Quartet, Kevin
Not Only In That Golden Tree...
(Clean Feed)
Parker, William & The Little Huey Creative Music Orchestra
For Percy Heath
(Les Disques Victo)
Dickey, Whit
Sacred Ground
(Clean Feed)
Taylor, Cecil Unit
The Eighth
(Hatology)
Jordan, "Kidd" Quartet
New Orleans Festival Suite
(Silkheart)
Cooper-Moore
Out Takes 1978
(Hopscotch Records)
Ribot, Marc
Spiritual Unity
(Pi Recordings)
Parker, Evan Trio & Peter Brotzmann Trio
The Bishop's Move
(Les Disques Victo)
Marcus Trio, Michael
Ithem
(Ayler Records)
Active Ingredients (Chad Taylor / Jemeel Moondoc / Tom Abbs / Steve Swell / Rob Mazurek / David Boykin / Avreeayl Ra)
Titration
(Delmark)
Dorgon, Mr. / Parker, William
9
(Jumbo)
Recommended & Related Releases:
Other Recommended Releases:
Bang, Billy
Distinction Without a Difference
(Corbett vs. Dempsey)
Ware, David S. Trio
Live in New York, 2010 [2 CDs]
(Aum Fidelity)
Nu Band, The
The Final Concert [VINYL]
(NoBusiness)
Riley, Howard
Constant Change 1976-2016 [5 CDs]
(NoBusiness)
Williams, Arthur (w/ Peter Kuhn / Toshinori Kondo / William Parker / Denis Charles)
Forgiveness Suite [VINYL]
(NoBusiness)
Hooker, William
Light (1975 - 1989) [4 CD Box Set]
(NoBusiness)
Bang, Billy / William Parker
Medicine Buddha
(NoBusiness)
Moondoc, Jemeel
The Zoopkeeper's House (Trio/Quartet/Quintet)
(Relative Pitch)
Bang, Billy
Da Bang!
(Tum)
Parker, Evan / Barry Guy / Paul Lytton
Live at Maya Recordings Festival
(NoBusiness)
Quat Quartet (Fred Van Hove, Els Vandeweyer, Paul Lovens, Martin Blume)
Live at Hasselt
(NoBusiness)
Group, The (Abdullah / Brown / Bang / Sirone / Hopkins / Cyrille)
Live
(NoBusiness)
Moondoc, Jemeel / Connie Crothers
Two
(Relative Pitch)
Element Choir, The & William Parker
At Christ Church Deer Park
(Barnyard)
Parker, William - The Inside Songs of Curtis Mayfield
I Plan To Stay A Believer [2 CDs]
(Aum Fidelity)
Parker, William
At Somewhere There
(Barnyard)
Gjerstad, Frode / Parker, William / Drake, Hamid
On Reade Street
(FMR)
Parker, William Quartet
Petit Oiseau
(Aum Fidelity)
Phillips, Barre / Joelle Leandre / William Parker / Tetsu Saitoh
After You Gone
(Les Disques Victo)
Kowald, Peter / William Parker
The Victoriaville Tape
(Les Disques Victo)



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