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Mitchell, Roscoe / Brus Trio: After Fallen Leaves (Silkheart)


 

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product information:


UPC: 89686600267

Label: Silkheart
Catalog ID: SHCD 126
Squidco Product Code: 5785

Format: CD
Condition: New
Country: Sweden
Packaging: Jewel Tray
Recorded in Studio 9, Swedish Radio, Stockhom, Sweden, October 30th & 31st, 1989, by Gert Palmcrantz


Personnel:

Roscoe Mitchell-flute, alto sax, tenor sax, soprano sax

Arne Forsen-piano

Ulf Åkerhielm-bass

Gilbert Matthews-drums, gongs, chines, percussion

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track listing:


1. Sing 15:22

2. A Lovely Day At The Point 4:40

3. The Reverend Frank Wright 7:04

4. And Then There Was Peace 4:50

5. The Two Faces Of Everett Sloane 3:29

6. After Fallen Leaves 7:59

7. Mr. Freddie 4:33

8. Come Gather Some Things 11:58

9. Play With The Whistler 7:26
Related Categories of Interest:

Silkheart
Jazz
February 2006
Chicago Jazz & Improvisation
Trio Recordings
Quartet Recordings
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descriptions, reviews, &c.

"In this one-shot session, Mitchell teams with a Swedish trio (which included South African native Gilbert Matthews on drums) for renditions of nine of his own compositions. They begin with "Sing," a delightful number originally recorded for his outstanding album on Nessa, Snerdy McGurdy and Her Dancin' Shoes. This performance, while less inspiredly funky than the first, has an interesting feel to it, with pianist Arne Forsen bringing in an approach reminiscent of Bobo Stenson's playing -- not your typical Roscoe Mitchell accompanist. Much of the rest of the disc sounds a bit too much like what, in fact, it is: Mitchell with a pickup trio. It's not that they're unsympathetic to his vision; they indeed seem to be big fans. But they contribute little special that you might have gotten with, say, a Muhal Richard Abrams/Malachi Favors/Steve McCall trio. Mitchell's playing itself is fine, and he elaborates on several of the musical ideas with which he was preoccupied in the late '80s:long swirls of circular breathing on the soprano, pointillistic attacks in sparse sonic structures, and delicate, shakuhachi-influenced sound poems. The more abstract pieces especially could have benefited from a more sensitive rhythm section. After Fallen Leaves isn't a bad album and it's always worth hearing Mitchell, but he has more than a dozen recordings under his name that should be heard first."-Brian Olewnick, All Music


Artist Biographies:

"Roscoe Mitchell (born August 3, 1940) is an American composer, jazz instrumentalist, and educator, known for being "a technically superb if idiosyncratic saxophonist." The Penguin Guide to Jazz described him as "one of the key figures" in avant-garde jazz; All About Jazz states that he has been "at the forefront of modern music" for the past 35 years. Critic Jon Pareles in The New York Times has mentioned that Mitchell "qualifies as an iconoclast." In addition to his own work as a bandleader, Mitchell is known for cofounding the Art Ensemble of Chicago and the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM).

Mitchell was born in Chicago, Illinois. He also grew up in the Chicago area, where he played saxophone and clarinet at around age twelve. His family was always involved in music with many different styles playing in the house when he was a child as well as having a secular music background. His brother, Norman, in particular was the one who introduced Mitchell to jazz. While attending Englewood High School in Chicago, he furthered his study of the clarinet. In the 1950s, he joined the United States Army, during which time he was stationed in Heidelberg, Germany and played in a band with fellow saxophonists Albert Ayler and Rubin Cooper, the latter of which Mitchell commented "took me under his wing and taught me a lot of stuff." He also studied under the first clarinetist of the Heidelberg Symphony while in Germany. Mitchell returned to the United States in the early 1960s, relocated to the Chicago area, and performed in a band with Wilson Junior College undergraduates Malachi Favors (bass), Joseph Jarman, Henry Threadgill, and Anthony Braxton (all saxophonists). Mitchell also studied with Muhal Richard Abrams and played in his band, the Muhal Richard Abrams' Experimental Band, starting in 1961.

In 1965, Mitchell was one of the first members of the non-profit organization Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM) along with Jodie Christian (piano), Steve McCall (drums), and Phil Cohran (composer). The following year Mitchell, Lester Bowie (trumpet), Kalaparusha Maurice McIntyre (tenor saxophone), Favors, Lester Lashley (trombone), and Alvin Fielder (drums), recorded their first studio album, Sound. The album was "a departure from the more extroverted work of the New York-based free jazz players" due in part to the band recording with "unorthodox devices" such as toys and bicycle horns.

From 1967 Mitchell, Bowie, Favors and, on occasion, Jarman performed as the Roscoe Mitchell Art Ensemble, then the Art Ensemble, and finally in 1969 were billed as the Art Ensemble of Chicago. The group included Phillip Wilson on drums for short span before he joined Paul Butterfield's band. The group lived and performed in Europe from 1969 to 1971, though they arrived without any percussionist after Wilson left. To fill the void, Mitchell commented that they "evolved into doing percussion ourselves." The band did eventually get a percussionist, Don Moye, who Mitchell had played with before and was living in Europe at that time. For performances, the band often wore brilliant African costumes and painted their faces. The Art Ensemble of Chicago have been described as becoming "possibly the most highly acclaimed jazz band" in the 1970s and 1980s.

Mitchell and the others returned to the States in 1971. After having been back in Chicago for three years, Mitchell then established the Creative Arts Collective (CAC) in 1974 that had a similar musical aesthetic to the AACM. The group was based in East Lansing, Michigan and frequently performed in auditoriums at Michigan State University. Mitchell also formed the Sound Ensemble in the early 1970s, an "outgrowth of the CAC" in his words, that consisted mainly of Mitchell, Hugh Ragin, Jaribu Shahid, Tani Tabbal, and Spencer Barefield.

In the 1990s, Mitchell started to experiment in classical music with such composers/artists such as Pauline Oliveros, Thomas Buckner, and Borah Bergman, the latter two of which formed a trio with Mitchell called Trio Space. Buckner was also part of another group with Mitchell and Gerald Oshita called Space in the late 1990s. He then conceived the Note Factory in 1992 with various old and new collaborators as another evolution of the Sound Ensemble.

He lived in the area of Madison, Wisconsin and performed with a re-assembled Art Ensemble of Chicago. In 1999, the band was hit hard with the death of Bowie, but Mitchell fought off the urge to recast his position in the group, stating simply "You can't do that" in an interview with Allaboutjazz.com editor-in-chief Fred Jung. The band continued on despite the loss.

Mitchell has made a point of working with younger musicians in various ensembles and combinations, many of whom were not yet born when the first Art Ensemble recordings were made. Mainly from Chicago, these players include trumpeter Corey Wilkes, bassist Karl E. H. Seigfried, and drummer Isaiah Spencer.

In 2007, Mitchell was named Darius Milhaud Chair of Composition at Mills College in Oakland, California, where he currently lives. Mitchell was chosen by Jeff Mangum of Neutral Milk Hotel to perform at the All Tomorrow's Parties festival in March 2012 in Minehead, England."

-Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roscoe_Mitchell)
11/21/2017

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

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