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Feldman, Morton: For Samuel Beckett <i>[Used Item]</i> (Hat [now] ART)


 

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product information:


UPC: 752156014225

Label: Hat [now] ART
Catalog ID: 142
Squidco Product Code: 28183

Format: CD
Condition: NM
Released: 2007
Country: Switzerland
Packaging: Cardstock foldover
Recorded May 24 & 25, 1991 at Sendesaal Hessischer Rundfunk. 2006 2nd edition

This is a USED (previously owned) item

Personnel:

Ensemble Modern-ensemble

Arturo Tamayo-conductor

Morton Feldman-compsoer

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Artist Biographies:

"Arturo Tamayo was born in Madrid and studied music at the Madrid Conservatory and conducting in Basel with Pierre Boulez and in Vienna with Witold Rowicki. He also studied composition at the Freiburg Musikhochschule with Klaus Huber and Wolfgang Fortner. Arturo Tamayo divides his activities as a conductor between the concert hall and the opera house, in a repertoire ranging from the Baroque to the contemporary. He has regularly conducted throughout Europe, America and Japan, and appeared at a number of major opera houses, including Covent Garden, the Deutsche Oper Berlin, the Vienna State Opera, Opéra de Paris, Teatro Real in Madrid, Rome Opera House, and many others. Tamayo has recorded for Deutsche Grammophon, Capriccio, Claves, BIS, Timpani, and several other labels."

-Naxos (https://www.naxos.com/person/Arturo_Tamayo/31490.htm)
10/1/2019

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.

"Morton Feldman was born in New York in 1926 and died there in 1987. Just like Cage, a close friend, he was an American composer - an American artist - an American in the true sense of the word.

He identified himself by differentiating his views on composition from those of his colleagues in Europe. He was proud to be an American because he was convinced that it enabled him the freedom, unparalleled in Europe, to work unfettered by tradition. And, he was an American also in what may have been a slight inferiority complex in the face of cultural traditions in Europe, something he proudly rejected and secretly admired.

Like any true artist, Feldman was endowed with a sensitivity for impressions of a wide variety of sources, literature and painting in particular. His affinity to Samuel Beckett has enriched music literature by a unique music theatre piece, Neither, and two ensemble works. His friendship with abstract impressionist painters gave birth to a range of masterpieces, Rothko Chapel in particular. But even the knotting of oriental rugs gave Feldman musical ideas (The Turfan Fragments).

To the question as to why he preferred soft dynamic levels, he replied:

"- Because when it's loud, you can't hear the sound. You hear its attack. Then you don't hear the sound, only in its decay. And I think that's essentially what impressed Boulez . That he heard a sound, not an attack, emerging and disappearing without attack and decay, almost like an electronic medium.

Also, you have to remember that loud and soft is an aspect of differentiation. And my music is more like a kind of monologue that does not need exclamation point, colon, it does not need..."

Feldman also had an intriguing reply up his sleeve when it came to answering the question why he composed in the first place:

"You know that marvellous remark of Disraeli's? Unfortunately, he was not a good writer, but if he was a great writer, it would have been a wonderful remark. They asked him whydid he begin to write novels. He said because there was nothing to read. (laughs). I felt very much like that in terms of contemporary music. I was not really happy with it. It became like a Rohrschach test".

More than twenty years since his death, Morton Feldman's music is as alive as ever."

-Universal Edition (http://www.universaledition.com/composers-and-works/Morton-Feldman/composer/220/biography)
10/1/2019

Have a better biography or biography source? Please Contact Us so that we can update this biography.
track listing:


1. Untitled 18:51

2. Untitled 24:45
descriptions, reviews, &c.
Previously played Squidco store copy, used for cataloging and samples, in excellent condition.

"For Samuel Beckett" is a late (1987) work, rich in detail and lush in sound (especially in relation to so many of his more austere pieces, early and late), but troubling, obsessed, claustrophobic in spite of its scope. Given their shared attraction to shadow (Feldman's music uses chiaroscuro in the way Beckett meticulously exploited darkness and light and the moods in between on the stage and on the page), it's perhaps surprising that Feldman's dedication didn't involve the starker textures of solo piano - an individual surrounded by ... nothing. In any case, this is not dazzling, but muted, orchestration; instrumental timbres and tonal colors emerge as if by chance and quickly disappear."-Art Lange

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Avant-Garde
Compositional Forms
March 2007
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